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Southern Oregon University


Angers Classroom 2The Summer Language Institute/MA in French Language Teaching has a unique curriculum designed by teachers to maximize your potential as a language teacher. Through courses on language acquisition and pedagogy as well as language and culture courses, you will improve both your language proficiency and cultural understanding while becoming a better teacher. The curriculum has three types of courses:

  • Core required courses in areas such as second language acquisition theory, assessment, and teaching for proficiency
  • Language and culture electives
  • Pedagogy courses which accompany each language or culture elective and focus on practical application of various pedagogical practices.

The descriptions below give you more details on each of these types of courses.

Overview

The Summer Language Institute for French Teachers offers you the opportunity to earn a Master of Arts in French Language Teaching (a total of 45 credits) over three summers. You may earn up to 18 credits each summer.

  • FL 511, Second Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice
  • FL 514, Action Research
  • FL 512 Teaching for Proficiency: Methods and Strategies
  • FL 513 Foreign Language Assessment: Principles and Strategies
  • FL 515 Teaching with Technology

These elective courses vary each summer, providing students with a variety of options. They are designed to build students' linguistic and cultural knowledge and enhance their pedagogical skills. Each of these courses is accompanied by a pedagogy course (2 credits) The following are examples of courses taught in the past. The schedule of courses for summer 2015 will be published soon.

  • Communicative Grammar (3 credits) with Teaching Grammar in Context (2 credits)
  • French Heritage Cinema (3 credits) with Teaching Language with Film (2 credits)
  • La France et ses immigrés (3 credits) with Teaching Culture (2 credits)
  • Le Théâtre du 20è (3 credits) with Teaching Language through Theater (2 credits)
  • Expression écrite (3 credits) with Teaching Writing (2 credits)
  • Contes et nouvelles (3 credits) with Teaching Language through Literature (2 credits)
  • Peinture du 19ème siècle (3 credits) with Teaching Language through Art (2 credits)
  • La Phonétique française (3 credits) with Teaching Pronunciation (2 credits)
  • Les Régions de France à travers le cinéma (3 credits) with Individual Differences (2 credits)

During the school year prior to your final year in the program, if you are a masters candidate, you will conduct an action research project with your own students/at your own school. You will write a 30-40 page paper (plus bibliography and appendices) documenting the project. The action research project, presentation and paper take the place of a thesis project, and are graded based on the AR project rubric and the AR presentation rubric.

 

Core Courses

Summer Session 1

Provides students with an overview of the most current theories of second language acquisition and the teaching methodologies that result from these approaches. Students will detail differences between and similarities among the various models of second language acquisition as they learn how to identify and integrate them into the foreign language classroom.

(3 credits)

 

Introduces students to research methodologies that pursue action (change) and research (understanding) concurrently. Students will learn how to do a systematic inquiry into the teaching/learning environment of a classroom with the goal of developing reflective teaching practices. This course is intended as preparation for an action research project that students will conduct over the course of the following year.  The grades for the project and presentations are determined by detailed rubrics (see above). 

 Summer Session II

Explores how proficiency standards can be applied in the classroom in conjunction with state and local standards based on the national standards for foreign language education as established by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students learn how to integrate the five Cs of foreign language education: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities, with clearly defined proficiency standards for foreign language performance.

(3 credits) 

 

Explores the many ways to assess foreign language proficiency. Compares traditional testing measures with more recent performance-based assessment methods and portfolio assessment models. Students study various assessment instruments and resources, as well as learning how to integrate assessment practices with foreign language standards.

(3 credits) 

 Winter Online Course

 

Transforms knowledge into practice about Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and pedagogy, while focusing on the use of technology in the foreign language classroom. Fosters professional development as students formulate critical skills for creating, integrating, and assessing technology into the classroom. Topics may include interactive and non-interactive hypermedia technologies, Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), language testing and technology, distance learning, online discussions, and software selection.

(3 credits) 

 

 

During the school year prior to your final year in the program, if you are a masters candidate, you will conduct an action research project with your own students/at your own school. You will write a 30-40 page paper (plus bibliography and appendices) documenting the project. The action research project, presentation and paper take the place of a thesis project, and are graded based on the AR project rubric and the AR presentation rubric.

 

Summer Session 1

Provides students with an overview of the most current theories of second language acquisition and the teaching methodologies that result from these approaches. Students will detail differences between and similarities among the various models of second language acquisition as they learn how to identify and integrate them into the foreign language classroom.

(3 credits) - Dr. Heather Willis Allen - Syllabus

Introduces students to research methodologies that pursue action (change) and research (understanding) concurrently. Students will learn how to do a systematic inquiry into the teaching/learning environment of a classroom with the goal of developing reflective teaching practices. This course is intended as preparation for an action research project that students will conduct over the course of the following year.

 (3 credits) - TBD  - Syllabus

 

Presentation of Action Research projects. This course is open to students presenting their final Action Research project. The course should be taken during the session when students present their project.

(1 credit) Dr. Béatrice Dupuy

 

Summer Session 2

 

Explores how proficiency standards can be applied in the classroom in conjunction with state and local standards based on the national standards for foreign language education as established by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students learn how to integrate the five Cs of foreign language education: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities, with clearly defined proficiency standards for foreign language performance.

(3 credits) - Lauren Schaffer - Syllabus

 

 

Explores the many ways to assess foreign language proficiency. Compares traditional testing measures with more recent performance-based assessment methods and portfolio assessment models. Students study various assessment instruments and resources, as well as learning how to integrate assessment practices with foreign language standards.

(3 credits) - Dr. Bonnie Adair-Hauck -Syllabus

Presentation of Action Research projects. This course is open to students presenting their final Action Research project. The course should be taken during the session when students present their project.

(1 credit) Dr. Béatrice Dupuy

2015 Electives

Students must choose both "a" and "b" of one course-grouping.

Summer Session 1

 

Depuis des années 1980, on a vu un renouveau cinématographique en France du film en costumes connu dans le monde anglophone sous le nom de « Heritage Film. » Ce genre, nommé en France « fiction patrimoniale » ou « films de patrimoine » reflète une nostalgie du passé ou une volonté de le reconstituer, une inquiétude de l’identité changeante de la France, et un désir de célébrer la grandeur littéraire française. Dans ce cours, nous analyserons des films de patrimoine pour en explorer les dimensions culturelles et identitaires dans le contexte de la France de l’époque, et dans le contexte du débat actuel sur l’identité nationale en France.

(3 credits) - Dr. Daniel R. Morris - Syllabus

This course will examine a number of learner characteristics (e.g., anxiety, learning strategies, learning styles,motivation) and how they impact students’ language-learning success. In addition, we will explore various classroom practices intended to address individual differences and improve student learning. Course requirements include designing a project that addresses specific learner characteristics to be implemented in the participant’s classroom.

(2 credits) - Dr. Heather Willis Allen

 

France has its share of cultural icons but beyond these facades, institutions, and symbols, how do French people live on a daily basis? This course offers a few itineraries that will be like windows on French culture. We will examine the relationships French people maintain with their cultural icons and with the important issues at stake in their daily lives. Through various texts (films, articles, news) as well as guided exploration of the city of Angers (France), we will explore French culture and reflect on American culture in order to establish a relation and a dialogue between them and to formulate hypotheses on similarities and differences that we observe.

(3 credits) - Dr. Sébastien Dubreil - Syllabus

Designed as a complement to FR 581 (La phonétique et la pronunciation du français), this course will address theoretical and practical aspects related to teaching French pronunciation. First, we will identify what to teach (e.g., native vs. approximate pronunciation, isolated vs. contextualized forms, problem areas for English speakers, varieties of spoken French), then we will explore how to teach pronunciation to engage students in different learning processes using a variety of pedagogical tools (e.g., music, film, idiomatic expressions, tongue twisters). Coursework will include analysis and creation of pedagogical materials to teach pronunciation.

(2 credits) Dr. Sébastien Dubreil - Syllabus

Summer Session 2

This course examines the situation of North African immigrants and their children in contemporary France: their daily lives and difficulties they experience due to conflicts between their traditions at home and at school or in society in general. Texts, films and documentaries will serve as topics of discussion and compositions.

(3 credits) - Dr. Marianne Golding  - Syllabus

Designed as a companion to La France et ses immigrés, this course will explore the theoretical foundations and practical implementations of effective culture teaching in the language classroom at all levels of the curriculum. We will envision the teaching of culture as a process of inquiry that presupposes engaging one’s own culture as well as formulating and testing hypotheses about the foreign culture. We will also explore issues related to the assessment of culture learning.

(2 credits) - Lauren Schaffer  - Syllabus

An intensive review of French grammar, focusing on common problem areas and more advanced concepts students must master to achieve higher level language proficiency. 

(3 credits) - CIDEF Faculty  - Syllabus

This course will share instructional strategies with the goal of assisting students to attain survival-level language (Intermediate-Low/Mid) in French.  Explores techniques for contextualized vocabulary development.  Examines the research on explicit/implicit approaches to grammar instruction and error correction.  Explores the PACE Model which is a dialogic approach to the teaching of grammar using authentic documents to focus on form. Also includes collaborative activities as well as extension activities which move the learners to independent practice.

(2 credits) - Dr. Bonnie Adair-Hauck

Optional Courses

 

This course focuses on typical grammatical difficulties of English speakers of French. The course will review complex French sentence structures and grammar that are commonly incorrectly used by English speakers. Focus is on building oral competency in using these structures correctly.

(1 credit) -  CIDEF Faculty

Designed to improve French conversational skills by focusing on linguistic functions appropriate to student levels. Students will narrate and describe, state and support opinions, and hypothesize using current events and topics from contemporary French culture as the content of discussion. This course may be taken for repeat credit. Up to 3 credits may be applied to degree requirements.

(1 credit) - CIDEF Faculty