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Southern Oregon University

Rhetoric and Reason Minor

Course Details 

 

Download the Rhetoric and Reason Minor Advising Checklist.

 

Required Courses

WR 230 Introduction to Rhetoric

Course Description: This is an introductory course which focuses on Classical rhetorical theory and practice and how this Classical theory and    practice may be useful in addressing contemporary issues and problems, along with a brief introduction to poetics and its relation to rhetoric.  The course reclaims the theories of knowledge and argumentative strategies built into ancient rhetorics, and argues for the communal nature of communication and the situational art of rhetoric as it responds to the human desire to affect the course of events. 4-credits.

Textbook: Crowley, Sharon and Debra Hawhee.  Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one course in college-level writing.

Advising: This course would normally be offered in the fall.

This course is in the process of being approved as a University Studies Explorations course. 

 

PHL 301 History of Philosophy

Course Description:  Explores Western philosophy, beginning with ancient Greece and continuing to the present. Courses do not have to be taken in sequence, but it is strongly recommended that students take PHL 302 before PHL 303. 4-credits.

Textbook: Varies

Prerequisite:  None.  Strongly recommended: PHL 302

Advising: This course is usually taught in the fall.

 

COMM 343 Argumentation, Debate, and Critical Thinking

Course Description: In this course, students will learn to construct effective extended arguments using rhetorical theories; critique arguments, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses; and communicate arguments  to audiences through writing and speaking.  Students will write both pro and con cases on controversial topics and engage in oral debates. 4-credits.

Textbook: Critical Thinking and Communication: The Use of Reason in Argument by Inch, Warnick, and Endres

Prerequisite: COMM 210 Public Speaking.  If you have sufficient previous  public speaking training and experience, you can seek to be waived out of  the prerequisite by contacting Alena.Ruggerio@sou.edu.

Advising:

This course is approved to complete the University Studies goals  of Integrations Strand I Citizenship and Social Responsibility.

This course also counts toward a minor in Human Communication. 

This course is usually taught in the winter. 

 

Select 12 credits from the following options

 

PHL 201 Introduction to Philosophy

Course Description:  Introduces philosophy's basic questions, including the nature of reality, personal identity, religion, art, the world we live in, right and wrong, mind and body, and knowledge. Approved for University Studies (Explorations). 4-credits.

Textbook:  Varies 

Prerequisite:
  None

 

PHL 203 Elementary Logic

Course Description: Addresses how to recognize and think about arguments, reasonings, and proofs. One-third of the course focuses on informal logic (thinking about actual arguments made in English), while the remaining two-thirds is devoted to formal logic (using symbols to analyze valid and invalid arguments). 4-credits.

Textbook: Varies

Prerequisite:
 None

 

PHL 330 Science, Democracy, and Citizenship

Course Description:  Explores the place of values in science and how it cuts across numerous debates in the philosophy, history, and social studies of science. Studies the place of values in science and how the practical implications are as deep as its philosophical implications. Considers the fundamental ideals of modern societies, such as rationality and progress, and how they are grounded in certain conceptions of science. Students are equipped to navigate through the complex issues of fact and value. Surveys various issues in the debate about the place of values and its ramifications. Prerequisite: Completion of Explorations courses or sophomore standing. 4-credits.

Textbook: Varies

Prerequisite:
 Completion of Explorations courses or sophomore standing.

 

COMM 342 Persuasion

Course Description: In this course, students will learn to create effective persuasive messages; practice critical consumption of persuasive  messages; and apply persuasion theories from rhetorical studies and  social science.  Students will complete a persuasion campaign term  project, constructing artifacts for a target audience to meet a persuasion need. 4-credits.

Textbook: Persuasion, Social Influence, and Compliance Gaining by Gass and Seiter

Prerequisite: COMM 210 Public Speaking.  If you have sufficient previous public speaking training and experience, you can seek to be waived out of  the prerequisite by contacting Alena.Ruggerio@sou.edu.

Advising: 
This course also counts toward a minor in Human Communication. 
This course also counts toward a communication emphasis in Business.

This course is usually taught in the fall and spring. 

 

COMM 412 Evaluation of Public Communication

Course Description: In this course, students will learn a range of rhetorical criticism methods used as frameworks for more effectively evaluating public communication messages from books, songs, websites, television shows, works of art, architecture, films, stories, and more. Students will choose an artifact of public communication and write an analysis of it using one of the methods of rhetorical criticism. 4-credits.

Textbook: Rhetorical Criticism by Foss

Prerequisite: COMM 300 Research Writing, or equivalent

Advising:  This course is not taught every academic year.

This course also counts toward a minor in Human Communication. 

 

COMM 460A Women Transforming Language

Course Description: In this course, students will learn different perspectives on the function of language for both oppression and liberation; understand a variety of different rhetorical options for gendered communication; and apply feminist rhetorical theories to personal experiences and outside texts.  Students will choose their own feminist rhetorical theorists and analyze their contribution to the transformation of language. 4-credits.

Textbook: Feminist Rhetorical Theories by Foss, Foss, and Griffin

Prerequisite: COMM 300 Research Writing, or equivalent

Advising: This course is approved to complete the University Studies goals of Integrations strand J Diversity and Global Awareness. This course also counts toward a minor in Women's Studies.
 This course also counts toward a minor in Human Communication.
  This course is usually taught in the fall. 

 

WR 493 Topics in Rhetoric

Course Description: Explores a range of rhetorical theories and practices.    Topics may include Western rhetorical history and traditions, discourse analysis, twentieth-century rhetorical theory, rhetoric and the body, women  in rhetoric, rhetoric and cultural studies, and rhetoric and technology. Repeat credit is allowed for different topics.
Textbook: Varies according to topic. Past texts have included: Sturken, Marita and Lisa Cartwright.  Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture; Hedges, Chris.  War Is A Force Which Gives Us Meaning. Several online sites specific to topic, but would include http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/Silva.htm. 4-credits.

Prerequisite: ENG 300
; Instructor permission.

Advising: Past topics have included Rhetoric of the Body, Rhetoric of Visual Culture, Rhetoric of War, and Figures and Tropes. 

 

SOC 461 Sociology of Religion

Course Description: Religion is fundamental to society.  Throughout history, religion has given people a sense of themselves and their cosmos.  It has held societies together and at times torn them apart.  It is at once a source of meaning and a source of confusion, for individuals and for groups. This is not a course about any particular religious belief or practice.  Rather we will examine the structure, function, and meaning of religion in general, with an emphasis on religious life in the U.S., the Pacific Northwest in particular. Through readings, lectures, films, and independent research projects, we will explore the character of contemporary religious life, recent changes, and the significance of those changes for society at large.  In the process, you will become acquainted with religious perspectives other than your own, you will learn to see the    effects of social organization on religious life, and you will come to understand the role religion plays in society at large. 4-credits.

Textbook: McGuire, Meredith B.  Religion: The Social Context.  Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 2008 (2002).

Prerequisite: SOC 204 and SOC 370

 

BI 382 Biology and Society

Course Description: Examines timely biological issues and their implications for human society. Students participate in and lead discussions on controversial topics such as genetic engineering, the biological basis of sexual orientation and race, biodiversity and threatened habitats, and biological warfare. Two 75-minute meetings per week and a community-based learning component. 3-credits.

Textbook:Varies

Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division University Studies requirements. 
Advising: Does not fulfill biology major or minor requirements. Approved for University Studies Integration and General Education Synthesis. 

 

BI 385 Women in Science

Course Description: Explores the past and current factors influencing women's scientific career choices and the success of women in various scientific disciplines.  Examines the lives and contributions of notable and contemporary women in science from a diversity of backgrounds and disciplines. The culture of science will be addressed and the role of gender in scientific inquiry. Course format includes small group discussions focused on assigned readings, and guest-speaker presentations from women scientists in academe, government and industry. Two, 75-minute meetings. 3-credits.

Textbook: Feeling for the Organism, The Dark Lady of DNA, plus article readings

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all lower division general education requirements.
 

Advising:

This course also counts toward a minor in Women's Studies.

This course is approved to complete a Synthesis and Application requirement for General Education in Science.
 This course is approved to complete the University Studies goals of Integrations strand H Science, Technology, and Society.
  This course is usually taught every two years.

Does not fulfill biology major or minor requirements. 
  
 
 

9/29/09