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Southern Oregon University


ANTH

 

New Courses

ANTH 214 — Language in the USA, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to linguistic anthropology through several examples of languages in the United States, which include indigenous (Native American) languages, colonial languages, languages introduced through recent immigration, and languages that newly developed in the United States. Topics include an overview to language usage patterns and norms; how language is linked to personal and group identity; an introduction to linguistic analysis; how languages differ, change and influence each other; and how language usage and ideologies both reflect and affect policy. Cross-listed with ENG 214.

ANTH 380 — Methods in Linguistic Anthropology, 4 credits
Advanced examination of language structure, use, and ideology, with a focus on research methods and disciplinary norms. Addresses formulating a research proposal, selecting and using suitable methodologies, analyzing and interpreting data, and assessing and addressing ethical concerns. Students will design and execute two original field research projects. May be applied to the International Studies major and minor. Prerequisite: ANTH 214 or ENG 214. Cross-listed with ENG 380.

ANTH 452 — Global Environmental Movements, 4 credits
Explores the diversity of contemporary environmental movements through ethnographic case studies from different parts of the world. In each case, we will consider how environmental conflicts and movements are shaped by cultural contexts and relations of power. Topics will include conservation, environmental justice, land rights, social movements, political ecology, and theories on nature, culture, and social change. The goal of the course is to expand students’ awareness of how people view nature cross-culturally, how understandings of environment shape social movements, and how local and global processes shape people, places, and environmental struggles. Prerequisites: ANTH 213 or ES 103 or graduate level standing.

ANTH 505 — Reading and Conference, 1-4 credits
Credits to be arranged in special consultation with professor.

ANTH 507 — Seminar, 1-4 credits
Credits to be arranged. Maximum 16 credits.

ANTH 509 — Practicum, 1-4 credits
Credits to be arranged. Maximum 16 credits

ANTH 552 — Global Environmental Movements, 4 credits
Explores the diversity of contemporary environmental movements through ethnographic case studies from different parts of the world. In each case, we will consider how environmental conflicts and movements are shaped by cultural contexts and relations of power. Topics will include conservation, environmental justice, land rights, social movements, political ecology, and theories on nature, culture, and social change. The goal of the course is to expand students’ awareness of how people view nature cross-culturally, how understandings of environment shape social movements, and how local and global processes shape people, places, and environmental struggles. Prerequisites: ANTH 213, ES 103, or graduate level standing.

Modified Courses

ANTH 299 — Special Studies– this course is repeatable.

ANTH 301 — Practicing Anthropologychange prerequisites to “USEM 103; ANTH 211, 213, or 214; anthropology majors or certificates only.”

ANTH 340 — Gender Issues– Rename Anthropology of Gender; modify course description; add GSWS 201 as alternative prerequisite.

ANTH 360 — Ethnnographic Research Methods– Minor description change.


ART

 

New Courses

ART 101 — The Studio: Art Foundations, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to a variety of art practices focusing on theoretical, conceptual and critical experiences. This three-quarter sequence immerses students in art production and ideation through investigations of themes such as Space, Being and Systems. Coursework engages and energizes students within an interdisciplinary environment fostering collaborative as well as personal, sustained investigations of non-media specific issues in contemporary art. The Studio is the core of the BA, BS and BFA degrees in studio art.

ART 102 — The Studio: Art Foundations, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to a variety of art practices focusing on theoretical, conceptual and critical experiences. This three-quarter sequence immerses students in art production and ideation through investigations of themes such as Space, Being and Systems. Coursework engages and energizes students within an interdisciplinary environment fostering collaborative as well as personal, sustained investigations of non-media specific issues in contemporary art. The Studio is the core of the BA, BS and BFA degrees in studio art.

ART 103 — The Studio: Art Foundations, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to a variety of art practices focusing on theoretical, conceptual and critical experiences. This three-quarter sequence immerses students in art production and ideation through investigations of themes such as Space, Being and Systems. Coursework engages and energizes students within an interdisciplinary environment fostering collaborative as well as personal, sustained investigations of non-media specific issues in contemporary art. The Studio is the core of the BA, BS and BFA degrees in studio art.

ART 205 — Programming for Artists, 2 credits
Students learn fundamental concepts of computer programming and electronics within the context of contemporary arts practice. Through lectures and hands-on projects, students learn to build algorithmic and interactive works utilizing images, video, sound, and robotics. Students develop projects using Max (a visual programming language for interactive art, music, and multimedia) and Arduino (a text-based programming language for robotics). No previous programming or electronics experience necessary. Corequisite: ART 205R. Cross-listed with EMDA 205. Approved for University Studies Explorations – Strand G.

ART 205R — Programming for Artists-Recitation, 2 credits
Students learn fundamental concepts of computer programming and electronics within the context of contemporary arts practice. Through lectures and hands-on projects, students learn to build algorithmic and interactive works utilizing images, video, sound, and robotics. Students develop projects using Max (a visual programming language for interactive art, music, and multimedia) and Arduino (a text-based programming language for robotics). No previous programming or electronics experience necessary. Corequisite: ART 205. Cross-listed with EMDA 205R.

ART 331 — The Art of Data – Visualizing Our World, 4 credits
Data is an ever present aspect of contemporary life. Students explore the uses of data in art as well as the application of artistic principles on data representing a range of local, social, political, scientific, environmental, and global issues. Through a series of hands-on computer programming based projects, students develop skills to represent and interpret complex datasets in a variety of ways including static and dynamic visualizations, sonification, and alternative modalities. Lecture topics include relevant visual theory, design theory, database aesthetics, and art and science collaboration. Cross-list with EMDA 331. Approved for University Studies Integration-Strand H (Science, Technology, and Society).

ART 345 — Motion Graphics I, , 4 credits
Students explore novice-to-intermediate digital motion graphics techniques with a heavy emphasis on animating typography, vector graphics, and 3D graphics for small-large scale professional video productions. Additional focus is placed on industry best practices and the cycle of critique and revision. Prerquisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, 205 or ART 205. Cross-listed as EMDA 342.

ART 363 — Digital Performance, 4 credits
Students research and create interdisciplinary performances using contemporary technologies. Topics include live cinema, electronic music, dance and technology, intermedia theater, and digitally-mediated performance art. Students develop projects independently and collaboratively that explore emerging practices resulting in end-of-term performances. Students from diverse arts backgrounds (art, film, music, theater, dance, etc.) are encouraged to enroll. Cross-list with EMDA 363.

ART 364 — Robotic Art: Interactive and Kinetic Systems, 4 credits
Students learn to incorporate hardware and software technologies into a wide variety of contemporary arts practice, resulting in original works of kinetic art, interactive installation, and robotic performance. Contextualized through readings and analysis of contemporary practices, students explore electrical and mechanical systems, microcontroller programming, sensors and actuators. Prerequisites: EMDA 203 or ART/EMDA 205. Cross-list with EMDA 364.

ART 365 — Sound Art and Experimental Music, 4 credits
Focuses on the theory, history, and practice of sound in the arts. Lectures, readings, and listening assignments on the history of sound art and experimental music. Advanced instruction in tools and techniques of audio recording, processing, and editing. Students compose projects utilizing a wide range of software and hardware techniques. Prerequisites: EMDA 203, ART 205, or EMDA 205. Cross-list with EMDA 365 and MUS 355.

Modified Courses

ART 133 — Introduction to Drawing– Modify description.

ART 290 — Introduction to Painting– Modify description.

ART 304 — Typography, Color, Design, and Drawing for Digital Media– Rename Typography, Color, Design. Modify description. Add ART 244 as prerequisite alternative.

ART 332 — Intermediate Drawing– Rename Representational Drawing Workshop; expand description. Add ART 102 as prerequisite alternative.

ART 333 — Drawing and Mixed Media– Rename Drawing II; modify description and change prerequisites to ART 133 or ART 102.

ART 344 — Graphic Design– Modify description. Change prerequisites to EMDA 201 and 201R, or ART 244.

ART 350 — Digital Print Studio– Add prerequisites of EMDA 201 and 201R.

ART 389 — Oil Painting Media– Rename Painting; modify description. Remove ART 133 prerequisite.

ART 390 — Intermediate Drawing and Painting Studio– Rename Drawing/Painting Explorations; modify description. Change prerequisites to 12 credits chosen from ART 327, 332, 333, or 389.

ART 444 — Graphic Design II– Modify description.

ART 490 — Advanced Studio in Painting and Drawing– Rename Drawing/Painting/Mixed Media Studio. Repeatable to maximum of 16 credits. Modify description; change prerequisites to ART 390 or permission of the instructor.


ARTH

 

New Courses

ARTH 342 — History of Collaborative Art and Social Practice, 4 credits
Examines the ethical, social, political, and aesthetic debates regarding collaboration in contemporary artistic practice. Students learn about the history of collaboration in modern and contemporary art and address the relationship between artists and their audience and participants in terms of power, ethics, economics, and aesthetics. Approved for University Studies Integration – Strand I.

ARTH 343 — Globalization and Contemporary Art, 4 credits
Introduces students to recent theories and practices of contemporary art in a global context. Examines the changing relationship of Western artists to the rest of the world, questions of nationalism, internationalism, and post-nationalism as categories of art historical inquiry, issues of ethnic and cultural difference, and theories of display and exhibition in a variety of local and international contexts. Students examine topics such as: art’s relationship to the global market, the role of national, ethnic, or racial identity in artistic production, and the impact of digital media on cultural globalization. Students identify some of the primary institutions and mechanisms of the “global art world” and focus on several key geographical regions in which contemporary artists engage with globalizing processes. Students gain knowledge of significant artists and texts and critically evaluate the challenges such artists pose to founding assumptions about artistic and art historical practice. Approved for University Studies Integration – Strand J.

Modified Courses

ARTH 204 — History of Art: Prehistory through Medieval– Modify description.

ARTH 205 — History of Art: Renaissance through Baroque– Rename History of Art: Early Modern; modify description

ARTH 206 — History of Art: Eighteenth Century to Contemporary– Rename History of Art: Nineteenth Century to Contemporary; modify description.


ARTM

 

New Courses

ARTM 399 — Special Studies, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.

ARTM 401/501 — Research, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.

ARTM 403/503 — Thesis, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.

ARTM 405/505 — Reading and Conference, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.

ARTM 407/507 — Seminar, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.

ARTM 409/509 — Practicum, 1-8 credits
Repeatable for up to 12 cr.


BA

 

New Courses

BA 402 — Practicum , credits TBA
Provides an opportunity to apply academic concepts in real-world work settings, including for-profit, nonprofit, and government organizations (arranged through the School of Business Internship Coordinator). Internships are usually conducted during senior year and must be approved prior to start of work experience. Students must have a GPA of at least 2.5 in BA courses and have completed all appropriate coursework in the major. Advisor approval is required if course is taken for elective credit. Graduate-level internships are arranged through the student’s graduate advisor. (For BA 402, 4 credits represents 120 hours in the workplace.) For Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) majors only.

BA 409 — Practicum , credits TBA
Provides an opportunity to apply academic concepts in real-world work settings, including for-profit, nonprofit, and government organizations (arranged through the School of Business Internship Coordinator). Internships are usually conducted during senior year and must be approved prior to start of work experience. Students must have a GPA of at least 2.5 in BA courses and have completed all appropriate coursework in the major. Advisor approval is required if course is taken for elective credit. Graduate-level internships are arranged through the student’s graduate advisor. (For BA 409, 4 credits represents 120 hours in the workplace.) For Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) majors only.

Modified Courses

BA 211 — Accounting Information I– Rename Financial Accounting; remove BA 131 prerequisite.

BA 213 — Accounting Information II– Rename Managerial Accounting.

BA 226 — Business Law– Modify description.

BA 314 — Hospitality Accounting and Financial Management– Rename Hospitality Financial Management; remove prerequisites.

BA 409 — Practicum– Rename “Practicum (for BA/BS Majors)”; restricted to BA/BS business majors.

BA 465A — CPA Review: Financial and Auditing– Rename CPA Review I; change description to cover one part of the CPA exam.

BA 465B — CPA Review: Business and Regulation– Rename CPA Review II; change description to cover one part of the CPA exam. Remove prerequisites of BA 226, 451, 453, and 454; add BA 455 prerequisite.

BA 468 — Principles of Marketing, Public Relations, and Fundraising– Rename Principles of Fundraising, Public Relations, and Marketing. Minor description change.

BA 478 — Corporate Law– Remove BA 226 prerequisite.

BA 483 — Sustainable Organizational Leadership– Rename Sustainability Leadership.

BA 551 — Cost and Management Accounting– Add BA 213 as prerequisite.

BA 555 — Auditing I– Add BA 454 or 554 as prerequisite.

BA 565A — CPA Review: Financial and Auditing– Rename CPA Review I; change description to cover one part of the CPA exam. Add prerequisites of BA 351, 352, and 455.

BA 565B — CPA Review: Business and Regulation– Rename CPA Review II; change description to cover one part of CPA exam. Add prerequisites of BA 351, 352, and BA 455.

BA 568 — Principles of Marketing, Public Relations, and Fundraising– Rename Principles of Fundraising, Public Relations, and Marketing. Minor description change.

BA 584 — Business Information Systems Design– Add BA 382 as prerequisite.

BA 597 — Advanced Management Information Systems– Add BA 382 as prerequisite.

Deleted Courses

BA 200 — Management of Aging Services Overview (Suspended)

BA 209 — Hospitality Practicum (Suspended)

BA 400/500 — Organizational Leadership in Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 406/506 — Senior Housing Operations Management (Suspended)

BA 410/510 — Special Topics (Suspended)

BA 412 — Hospitality Law and Management (Suspended)

BA 416/516 — Healthcare Delivery for Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 417/517 — Technology Advances in Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 420/520 — Business Trends and Research in Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 422/522 — Financial Management of Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 424/524 — Marketing of Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 426/526 — Development and Construction of Aging Services (Suspended)

BA 482/582 — Labor Relations (Suspended)

BA 498/598 — Women’s Issues in Management (Suspended)


BI

 

Modified Courses

BI 383 — Our Microbial World– Renumber BI 387 [change made Fall 2012]

BI 446 — Evolution– Renumber as BI 348. Change co-requisite to BI 348R.

BI 446R — Evolution Recitation– Renumber to BI 348R. Change co-requisite to BI 348.

Deleted Courses

BI 343 — Developmental Biology (Suspended)


CCJ

 

New Courses

CCJ 382 — The Making of a Criminal, 4 credits
Examines criminal behavior from a developmental perspective, tracing aggression across the life course. Covers a wide array of material relevant to the development of antisocial behavior, such as: childhood, adolescence, adulthood, gender and physiological differences, and other biosocial factors. CCJ 230 and 231 strongly recommended.

CCJ 383 — Women and Crime, 4 credits
A study of the nature and extent of women's crimes, theories of female criminality, processing of women offenders through the criminal justice system, the response of police and court officials to women as victims of crime, and opportunities for women as employees in criminal justice agencies. Prerequisites: CCJ 230 and 231.

Modified Courses

CCJ 230 — American Criminal Justice System– Minor description change.

CCJ 241 — Introduction to Law Enforcement– Minor description change.

CCJ 251 — Introduction to Criminal Law– Modify description.

CCJ 298 — Orientation to Criminology and Criminal Justice at SOU– Graded P/NP.

CCJ 300 — Essentials of Criminal Justice Research and Writing– Modify description; change prerequisites to: CCJ pre-major, major or minor; CCJ 230, 231, 251, and 298.

CCJ 309 — Research Methods in Criminology/Criminal Justice– Modify description; change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 298, and 300.

CCJ 321 — Criminal Investigation– List prerequisites as CCJ 241 or CCJ 251.

CCJ 331 — Theories of Criminal Behavior– Minor description change; list prerequisites as CCJ 230, 231, 298, and 300.

CCJ 341 — Correctional Institutions– Renumber CCJ 371. Minor description change.

CCJ 361 — Juvenile Delinquency– Minor description change

CCJ 381 — Serial Killers– Rewrite description.

CCJ 384 — Violence and Victimology– Rename Criminal Violence; modify description.

CCJ 400 — Capstone: Research– Rewrite and expand description.

CCJ 407 — Seminar: Special Topics– Course is repeatable. Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 409L — Capstone: Practicum/Internship– Add course description. Restricted to CCJ majors.

CCJ 411 — Criminal Law– Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 412 — Law of Criminal Evidence– Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 413 — Law of Criminal Procedures– Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 241, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 414 — Contemporary Issues in Corrections– Rename Constitutional Issues in Corrections. Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 251, 271, 298, 300.

CCJ 417 — Police Problems and Issues– Rename Contemporary Issues in Policing; minor description change; change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 241, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 430 — Crime Control Theories and Policies– Minor description change. Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 241, 251, 271, 298, 300.

CCJ 451 — Criminal Justice Leadership– Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 298, 300.

CCJ 460 — Comparative Criminal Justice– Modify description; change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 241, 251, 271, 298, 300.

CCJ 461 — Terrorism– Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 462 — Criminal Forensic Investigations– Significantly shorten description. Change prerequisites to CCJ 230, 231, 241, 251, 298, 300.

CCJ 511 — Criminal Law– Change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.

CCJ 512 — Law of Criminal Evidence– Change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.

CCJ 513 — Law of Criminal Procedures– Change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.

CCJ 530 — Crime Control Theories and Policies– Minor description change; change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.

CCJ 551 — Criminal Justice Leadership– Change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.

CCJ 561 — Terrorism– Change prerequisites to Instructor Consent.


CH

 

New Courses

CH 325 — The Chemistry of Drugs, 4 credits
Covers introductory chemical principles as a launching point of studying drugs. Through the lens of chemistry, origins of drugs are studied and the pharmacology of various prescription and recreational drugs are examined. Societal issues surrounding drug use are also explored. Does not fulfill Chemistry major or minor requirements. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.


CM

 

New Courses

CM 330 — Introduction to Cybernetics & Cyberculture, 4 credits
Students learn how cybernetic technologies have developed and become incorporated into everyday life and culture. This course interrogates emerging common wisdom about these new technologies, and discusses the significance of cultural issues such as post-humanism and cyborgs in popular culture. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with EMDA 330.

CM 341 — Remix Culture, 4 credits
Examines acts of creative repurposing – the mashing, meme-ing, sampling, hacking and sharing of pre-existing content toward modified ends. Students will explore and participate in different remix practices, including visual essays, found footage videos and audio mashups, while interrogating the legal, artistic and cultural implications of these practices in the process. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with EMDA 341.

CM 362 — Transmedia Storytelling, 4 credits
Introduces students to transmedia storytelling by looking at its place in today’s media landscape, exploring its diverse functions and forms, and introduces the production techniques that are used to develop, produce, and distribute transmedia content across a variety of platforms. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with EMDA 362.

CM 411 — Online Cultures, 4 credits
Examines how online platforms and networks foster new kinds of communities, identities, and social movements. Students will consider key accounts of social media, debate its effects, and examine best practices for using it. Students will also use online platforms to create their own communities, conduct research, and interact with each other using virtual spaces. Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with EMDA 411.

Modified Courses

CM 363 — Documentary Film Theory and Criticism– Rename Documentary Film: Theory and Criticism. Modify description; remove prerequisites.


COMM

 

Modified Courses

COMM 300 — Research Strategies– Change prerequisites to COMM 200 or COMM 201 or FLM 290.

COMM 301 — Communication Theory– Renumber COMM 302 and rename Communication and Media Theory; modify description. Change prerequisites to COMM 200 or COMM 201.

Deleted Courses

COMM 301 — Communication Theory

COMM 370 — Mass Media Theory


COUN

 

New Courses

COUN 507 — Seminar: Special Topics, 1-4 credits
Offers focused study in counseling or related fields relevant to counseling. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


CS

 

New Courses

CS 256 — Computer Science I, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming, computer architecture, and software development. Intended for computer science majors.

Modified Courses

CS 200 — Computer Science I– Rename Introduction to Computer Science – change course description to “Introduces computer science, including the foundational skills of programming. Intended for non-majors.”

CS 258 — Computer Science III– The prerequisite of CS 257 must be completed with a B or better.

CS 275 — Machine Structures and Assembly Language– Renumber CS 314; rename Computer Organization. The prerequisite of CS 257 must be completed with a B or better.

CS 367 — C and UNIX– The prerequisite of CS 257 must be completed with a B or better.

CS 380 — Net Development– Renumber CS 280.

CS 415 — Foundations of Emerging Computing Applications– Omit prerequisites of “MTH 112 or an appropriate SOU placement level.”

CS 469 — Systems Analysis– In description, replace the words “object-oriented design alternatives” with the word “testing.” Change prerequisites to CS 360, CS 411, and senior standing.

CS 470 — Capstone Project I– Rename Capstone Project. Omit final sentence of description, “Project I involves project selection and completion of the design phase.”

CS 515 — Foundations of Emerging Computing Applications– Omit prerequisites of “MTH 112 or an appropriate SOU placement level.”

CS 569 — Systems Analysis– In description, replace the words “object-oriented design alternatives” with the word “testing.” Change prerequisites to CS 360, CS 411, and graduate standing.

Deleted Courses

CS 471 — Capstone Project II (Suspended)

CS 570 — Capstone Project I (Suspended)

CS 571 — Capstone Project II (Suspended)


D

 

New Courses

D 182 — Introduction to Modern Dance, 2 credits
Explores technique, improvisation and compositional components of modern dance for beginning and experienced dancers. Also covers techniques to strengthen and stretch your body and creativity. Students will learn basic modern dance technique and form, explore partnering skills, and play with improvisational structures both individually and in groups. Students will be given a prompt by the instructor and guided through the development of a movement phrase for the final exam. Dancers will present their phrase for the final exam. Cross-listed with TA 182 and PE 182.

D 183 — Dance Improvisation, 2 credits
Utilizing the elements of dance, this class investigates movement through structured explorations for the creative development of personal movement repertoire, spontaneous group interaction, and observation skills. The course emphasizes the exploration of movement through spur-of-the-moment problem solving and creative risk-taking. This course is designed to evoke the student’s creative movement individuality and sense of ensemble. It may also include weight-sharing and contact improvisation. Cross-listed with TA 183 and PE 183.


ED

 

New Courses

ED 431 — Teaching English Language Learners, 3 credits
Introduces future educators to the knowledge, skills, attitudes, insights and resources necessary to meet the needs of English language learners (ELL)S) in mainstream elementary classroom. In addition to an overview of current theories and issues in the teaching of ELLs, the course focuses on active, hands-on methods for engaging and instructing ELLs. Participants will learn how to create a culturally responsive classroom, apply appropriate differentiated teaching techniques for children and their stage of language acquisition, and plan lessons with rich content and context to facilitate comprehension. Future educators will recognize the value of families' native languages and cultures as the foundation for developing language proficiency. Restricted to elementary education majors.

ED 435 — Math/Science Methods
Familiarizes licensure students with the skills, instructional strategies, curricular designs, and materials associated with successful teaching of math content, problem solving, science content and inquiry at the developmental levels designated in the TSPC licensure framework. Emphasizes effective strategies for standards-based education and the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, Oregon Science Standards, and the Next Generation Science Standards.  The course will illuminate how engaging, creative instructional strategies can enhance and inspire student learning, with a strong focus on issues related to the inclusion of students with diverse backgrounds, learning styles, skills, strengths and special needs.

ED 461 — Health/PE Methods
Examines principles of children’s health, safety, and ways in which classroom teachers can help students develop movement skills and an active, healthy lifestyle. Addresses planning, implementation, and evaluation of health and physical education instruction. Topics include mental, emotional, and personal wellness for children in grades K-8. The course provides opportunities for active participation in the Great Body Shop Curriculum.

ED 532 — Teaching English Language Learners, 3 credits
Introduces future educators to the knowledge, skills, attitudes, insights and resources necessary to meet the needs of English language learners (ELL)S) in mainstream elementary classroom. In addition to an overview of current theories and issues in the teaching of ELLs, the course focuses on active, hands-on methods for engaging and instructing ELLs. Participants will learn how to create a culturally responsive classroom, apply appropriate differentiated teaching techniques for children and their stage of language acquisition, and plan lessons with rich content and context to facilitate comprehension. Future educators will recognize the value of families' native languages and cultures as the foundation for developing language proficiency.

Modified Courses

ED 457B — Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment– Modify description.

ED 458 — Social Science Methods– Modify description.

ED 463A — Reading and Language Arts Methods A– Change to 3 credits; modify description.

ED 464 — Science Methods– Renumber ED 435 and rename Math/Science Methods; modify description.

ED 467 — Health Education Methods– Renumber ED 461 and rename Health/PE Methods, modify description.

ED 471 — Inclusion Strategies– Modify description.

ED 493 — Observation and Evaluation of Teaching– Modify description.

ED 512 — Educational Research– Rename Research Investigations

ED 534 — Educational Technology– Change to 3 credits.

ED 566 — Human Relations– Change to 3 credits.

ED 567 — Contemporary Issues, Leadership, and Collaboration– Change to 3 credits.

ED 592 — Humanizing Instruction– Rename Humanizing the Workplace

ED 597 — Creativity in the Classroom– Rename Creativity in the Workplace

Deleted Courses

ED 464 — Science Methods

ED 465 — Math Methods

ED 467 — Health Education Methods

ED 468 — Physical Education Methods


EMDA

 

New Courses

EMDA 199 — Special Studies, 1-15 credits

EMDA 204 — Digital Audio Foundations, 2 credits
Focuses on the development and applications of digital audio production, including recording, editing, and sound processing. Introduces topics including history of electronic music and sound art, scientific and cultural theories of sound, and interdisciplinary uses of digital audio. Serves as a prerequisite or recommended course for several upper division courses in art, music, and video production. Corequisite: EMDA 204R.

EMDA 204R — Digital Audio Foundations – Recitation, 2 credits
Focuses on the development and applications of digital audio production, including recording, editing, and sound processing. Introduces topics including history of electronic music and sound art, scientific and cultural theories of sound, and interdisciplinary uses of digital audio. Serves as a prerequisite or recommended course for several upper division courses in art, music, and video production. Corequisite: EMDA 204.

EMDA 205 — Programming for Artists, 2 credits
Students learn fundamental concepts of computer programming and electronics within the context of contemporary arts practice. Through lectures and hands-on projects, students learn to build algorithmic and interactive works utilizing images, video, sound, and robotics. Students develop projects using Max (a visual programming language for interactive art, music, and multimedia) and Arduino (a text-based programming language for robotics). No previous programming or electronics experience necessary. Corerequisite: EMDA 205R. Cross-listed with ART 205.

EMDA 205R — Programming for Artists: Recitation, 2 credits
Students learn fundamental concepts of computer programming and electronics within the context of contemporary arts practice. Through lectures and hands-on projects, students learn to build algorithmic and interactive works utilizing images, video, sound, and robotics. Students develop projects using Max (a visual programming language for interactive art, music, and multimedia) and Arduino (a text-based programming language for robotics). No previous programming or electronics experience necessary. Corerequisite: EMDA 205. Cross-listed with ART 205R.

EMDA 209 — Practicum, 1-15 credits

EMDA 299 — Special Studies, 1-15 credits

EMDA 320 — Writing Nonlinear, 4 credits
Students practice and engage in a study of the theoretical discourse around the evolution of nonlinear, interactive texts and develop independent and/or collaborative critical studies on selected sub-topics, creating digital-media presentations on their findings for the campus and/or online communities. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205.

EMDA 321 — Theory & Practice in Emerging Media & Digital Arts, 4 credits
Introduces students to a broad range of contemporary creators (both artistic and commercial) using digital and other emerging technology. Also introduces students to key theories about emerging technology. These two components are related: students apply the theories to the contemporary examples as a way of testing out their explanatory power. In this way the class aims to broaden students’ sense of what is possible with emerging technology, and to deepen their ability to think about it. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205.

EMDA 330 — Introduction to Cybernetics & Cyberculture, 4 credits
Students learn how cybernetic technologies have developed and become incorporated into everyday life and culture. This course interrogates emerging common wisdom about these new technologies, and discusses the significance of cultural issues such as post-humanism and cyborgs in popular culture. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with CM 330.

EMDA 331 — The Art of Data , 4 credits
Data is an ever present aspect of contemporary life. Students explore the uses of data in art as well as the application of artistic principles on data representing a range of local, social, political, scientific, environmental, and global issues. Through a series of hands-on computer programming based projects, students develop skills to represent and interpret complex datasets in a variety of ways including static and dynamic visualizations, sonification, and alternative modalities. Lecture topics include relevant visual theory, design theory, database aesthetics, and art and science collaboration. Cross-list with ART 331. Approved for University Studies Integration-Strand H (Science, Technology, and Society).

EMDA 340 — Building the Web: Sites to Content Management Systems, 4 credits
Provides a hands-on foundation in online literacy for students interested in building websites, creating digital media for online consumption and utilizing one or more of the many open-source content management systems available. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205.

EMDA 341 — Remix Culture, 4 credits
Examines acts of creative repurposing – the mashing, meme-ing, sampling, hacking and sharing of pre-existing content toward modified ends. Students will explore and participate in different remix practices, including visual essays, found footage videos and audio mashups, while interrogating the legal, artistic and cultural implications of these practices in the process. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with CM 341.

EMDA 342 — Motion Graphics I, 4 credits
Students explore novice-to-intermediate digital motion graphics techniques with a heavy emphasis on animating typography, vector graphics, and 3D graphics for small-large scale professional video productions. Additional focus is placed on industry best practices and the cycle of critique and revision. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with ART 345.

EMDA 362 — Transmedia Storytelling, 4 credits
Introduces students to transmedia storytelling by looking at its place in today’s media landscape, exploring its diverse functions and forms, and introduces the production techniques that are used to develop, produce, and distribute transmedia content across a variety of platforms. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Cross-list with CM 362.

EMDA 363 — Digital Performance, 4 credits
Students research and create interdisciplinary performances using contemporary technologies. Topics include live cinema, electronic music, dance and technology, intermedia theater, and digitally-mediated performance art. Students develop projects (independently and collaboratively) that explore emerging practices resulting in end-of-term performances. Students from diverse arts backgrounds (art, film, music, theater, dance, etc.) are encouraged to enroll. Prerequisites: EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205. Restricted to students with junior standing or above. Cross-listed with ART 363.

EMDA 364 — Robotic Art: Interactive and Kinetic Systems, , 4 credits
Students learn to incorporate hardware and software technologies into a wide variety of contemporary arts practice, resulting in original works of kinetic art, interactive installation, and robotic performance. Contextualized through readings and analysis of contemporary practices, students explore electrical and mechanical systems, microcontroller programming, sensors and actuators. Prerequisites: EMDA 203 or EMDA/ART 205. Cross-list with ART 364.

EMDA 365 — Sound Art and Experimental Music, 4 credits
Focuses on the theory, history, and practice of sound in the arts. Lectures, readings, and listening assignments on the history of sound art and experimental music. Advanced instruction in tools and techniques of audio recording, processing, and editing. Students compose projects utilizing a wide range of software and hardware techniques. Prerequisites: EMDA 203, ART 205, or EMDA 205. Cross-list with ART 365 and MUS 355.

EMDA 403 — Thesis, 1-15 credits

EMDA 410 — Cultures of Video Gaming: The Serious Business of Play, 4 credits
This course takes for granted the aesthetic and commercial significance of video and computer games. It explores their popularity, but more importantly, their potential for aesthetic expression, cultural meaning, and collective action. In the course of our investigations, we will run the gamut from individual neurology to widespread social and economic networks, from the history of games to efforts to “gamify” everyday activities to enhance people’s productivity and satisfaction, from the importance of play in our evolutionary history to theories about what makes for good game play in your favorite games. Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321.

EMDA 411 — Online Cultures, 4 credits
Examines how online platforms and networks foster new kinds of communities, identities, and social movements. Students will consider key accounts of social media, debate its effects, and examine best practices for using it. Students will also use online platforms to create their own communities, conduct research, and interact with each other using virtual spaces. Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with CM 411

EMDA 420 — Science Fiction Film, 4 credits
Explores Fredric Jameson’s assertion that Science Fiction is “the social realism of our time” because it dramatizes the dilemmas and opportunities of living in a highly mediated world, one saturated with imagery, much of it commercial, where the boundaries between the real and the virtual are uncertain. In addition to studying the history of science fiction film and discussing theories of virtual reality, the course will examine the specific technologies used to produce special effects in Science Fiction (and increasingly most) film. Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with FLM 420.

EMDA 421 — Animation & Anime, 4 credits
Considers what makes animation distinctive as an art form, the technologies used to produce it, and its relation to broader cultural issues such as Disney’s historic influence on childhood experience. The class also examines the way that Anime crosses boundaries: bridging different national markets and cultures, spilling into other genres such as comics (manga) and video games, and blurring lines between consumers and producers (Otaku or fan culture). Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with FLM 421.

EMDA 450 — Capstone, 4 credits
Students compile a portfolio of their best work, and form near- and long-term plans for their working lives after graduation. They also create Personal Learning Networks so they can stay abreast of their field, begin to cultivate online ties to help them after graduation, and create or refine an online presence to showcase their work. Prerequisites: EMDA 350. Restricted to EMDA majors with senior standing.

EMDA 499 — Special Studies, 1-15 credits

Modified Courses

EMDA 201 — Emerging Media and Digital Arts I– Rename Digital Image Foundations.

EMDA 201R — Emerging Media and Digital Arts I-Recitation– Rename Digital Image Foundations – Recitation.

EMDA 202 — Emerging Media and Digital Arts II– Rename Digital Video Foundations. Cross-list with VP 202.

EMDA 202R — Emerging Media and Digital Arts II - Recitation– Rename Digital Video Foundations-Recitation. Cross-list with VP 202R.

EMDA 203 — Emerging Media and Digital Arts III– Rename Digital Interactive Foundations.

EMDA 203R — Emerging Media and Digital Arts III-Recitation– Rename Digital Interactive Foundations-Recitation.

EMDA 350 — Projects in Digital Media– Change credits from 4 credits to 1-4 credits; change prerequisites to “8 credits from EMDA 201, 202, 203, 204, or 205.”

EMDA 409 — Practicum in Digital Media– Change variable credit to 1-15 credits, repeatable to a maximum of 15 credits.


ENG

 

New Courses

ENG 214 — Language in the USA, 4 credits
Provides an introduction to linguistic anthropology through several examples of languages in the United States, which include indigenous (Native American) languages, colonial languages, languages introduced through recent immigration, and languages that newly developed in the United States. Topics include an overview to language usage patterns and norms; how language is linked to personal and group identity; an introduction to linguistic analysis; how languages differ, change and influence each other; and how language usage and ideologies both reflect and affect policy. Cross-listed with ANTH 214.

ENG 245 — Ethnic American Literature in the U.S., 4 credits
Students will be introduced to a sampling of texts in various U.S. ethnic literary traditions that demonstrate the dynamic nature of each particular tradition. Given that many of these texts are an act of resistance to dominant society’s forms of categorization, we will be exploring some of the histories that have engendered these texts. Relevant topics that may be addressed: migrations, racism, sexism, marginalization, nationalism, colonization, resilience and celebration. Approved for University Studies Explorations – Strand E.

ENG 380 — Methods in Linguistic Anthropology, 4 credits
Advanced examination of language structure, use, and ideology, with a focus on research methods and disciplinary norms. Addresses formulating a research proposal, selecting and using suitable methodologies, analyzing and interpreting data, and assessing and addressing ethical concerns. Students will design and execute two original field research projects. May be applied to the International Studies major and minor. Prerequisite: ANTH 214 or ENG 214. Cross-listed with ANTH 380.

ENG 443 — Chicana/o Literature, 4 credits
Introduces students to Chicana/o literature and its historical and political contexts. Aside from focus on the genesis of the Chicana/o literary canon, this course will also look at the representations of Chicana/o identities. Prerequisite: ENG 300. Restricted to students with junior standing or above. Approved for University Studies Integration – Strand J

Modified Courses

ENG 454 — American Multicultural Literature– Rename Multicultural Literature of the U.S.; modify description.

ENG 482 — The Novel in the U.S.: 1900 and Beyond– Modify description.


ENGR

 

Modified Courses

ENGR 101 — Engineering Orientation I: Careers, Skills, and Computer Tools– Rename Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation I; modify description; cross-list with PH 101.

ENGR 102 — Engineering Orientation II: Careers, Skills, and Computer Tools– Rename Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation II; modify description; cross-list with PH 102.

ENGR 103 — Engineering Orientation III: Careers, Skills, and Computer Tools– Rename Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation III; modify description; cross-list with PH 103.

ENGR 211 — Statics– Remove PH 201 prerequisite.

ENGR 322 — Analog Electronics– Increase to 5 credits.

ENGR 323 — Digital Electronics– Increase to 5 credits.

ENGR 336 — Optics Laboratory– Increase to 2 credits.

ENGR 374 — Introduction to Materials Science– Increase to 4 credits.

ENGR 375 — Thermodynamics of Materials– Increase to 4 credits.

ENGR 474 — Kinetics in Materials– Increase to 4 credits.

ENGR 475 — Nanoparticles and Nanoparticle Technology– Rename Nanophysics and Nanotechnology


ES

 

New Courses

ES 405/505 — Reading and Conference , 1-16 credits
16 credit maximum

ES 408/508 — Workshop , 1-16 credits
16 credit maximum

Modified Courses

ES 495 — Environmental Studies Honors Capstone I– Rename Environmental Studies Individual Capstone I; minor description revision.

ES 496 — Environmental Studies Honors Capstone II– Rename Environmental Studies Individual Capstone II.

ES 497 — Environmental Studies Honors Capstone III– Rename Environmental Studies Individual Capstone III.


FLM

 

New Courses

FLM 290 — Introduction to Film, 4 credits
Introduces students to film form and structure; gives students skills to understand, write about and produce films. Focuses on film aesthetics, (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and sound); film genres; narrative and non-narrative structures; and the dynamics of the viewing experience.

FLM 420 — Science Fiction Film, 4 credits
Explores Fredric Jameson’s assertion that Science Fiction is “the social realism of our time” because it dramatizes the dilemmas and opportunities of living in a highly mediated world, one saturated with imagery, much of it commercial, where the boundaries between the real and the virtual are uncertain. In addition to studying the history of science fiction film and discussing theories of virtual reality, the course will examine the specific technologies used to produce special effects in Science Fiction (and increasingly most) film. Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with EMDA 420.

FLM 421 — Animation & Anime, 4 credits
Considers what makes animation distinctive as an art form, the technologies used to produce it, and its relation to broader cultural issues such as Disney’s historic influence on childhood experience. The class also examines the way that Anime crosses boundaries: bridging different national markets and cultures, spilling into other genres such as comics (manga) and video games, and blurring lines between consumers and producers (Otaku or fan culture). Prerequisites: EMDA 320 or 321. Cross-list with EMDA 421.

Deleted Courses

FLM 295 — Masterpieces of Film


FR

 

Modified Courses

FR 516 — Topics in French Language Pedagogy– Change to 2 credits [approved by Graduate council 6/8/12]


GSWS

 

New Courses

GSWS 409 — Practicum, 1-16 credits
Practicum must be approved by the Program coordinator and/or Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Council.

Modified Courses

GSWS 401 — Research– Minor description change.

GSWS 410 — Feminist Theory in Action– Rename Feminist and Queer Theory in Action; modify description; GSWS 201 is a prerequisite.


HE

 

Modified Courses

HE 309 — Practicum– Remove statement about repeatability for 12 credits.


HO

 

Modified Courses

HO 250 — Logic and Line of Argumentation– Change prefix to HON 250.

HO 251 — Fallacies in Arguments– Change prefix to HON 251.

HO 252 — Varieties of Reasoning– Change prefix to HON 252.


HON

 

New Courses

HON 101 — Honors Foundations, 4 credits
The student will demonstrate proficiency in critical reading, analysis, and discussion; being able to identify a subject, purpose, thesis, supporting points, evidence, assumptions, and conclusions in a text; and being able to craft a thesis claim. In addition, the student will demonstrate that he or she can tailor an essay to fit one’s audience and intent, overcome writer’s block through exercises like free-writing and clustering ideas, and write paragraphs that have unity, development, and coherence. Finally, the student will show attentiveness to sentence-level choices, so that writing has vigor, precision, economy, and flair, and design effective beginnings and endings.

HON 102 — Honors Foundations, 4 credits
The student will demonstrate an ability to choose a general subject, compile a working bibliography, limit areas of research, formulate a tentative thesis and restate it. Students will also have mastered careful reading and taking notes, the arts of summary, paraphrase, and quotation, and the craft of preparing an outline and writing a first draft. Finally, each student will show that he or she can identify logical fallacies, document sources, and revise and write a final draft. Prerequisite: HON 101.

HON 103 — Honors Foundations, 4 credits
The student will demonstrate continued practice of critical thinking skills covered in Fall and Winter through a continued discussion about class readings. The student will also show evidence of information literacy through library research and show a sharpening judgment of legitimate sources. The student will show that he or she is addressing poor writing habits identified in the previous quarters and practicing strategies of sharpening a thesis and developing a coherent an essay. The student will demonstrate habits of revision and time management. Finally, the student will have performed collaboration through small group work, public speaking through small classroom presentations, and creativity by adapting a project from one medium to another. Prerequisite: HON 102.

HON 243 — Probability and Statistics, 4 credits
Integrates basic concepts of probability and statistics. Topics from probability include Venn diagrams, independence, mutually exclusive, conditional probability, and counting techniques such as permutations, combinations, and sampling with or without replacement. Covers techniques for describing data both graphically and numerically. Introduces inferential statistical concepts such as the Normal distribution, regression, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and p-values. Students may receive credit for MTH 243 or HON 243, but not both. Approved for University Studies (Strand D). Prerequisite: MTH 95 or an appropriate SOU placement level; enrollment in Honors College.

HON 301 — Biography: Historical and Contemporary Figures, 4 credits
Students will read and critically evaluate at least one authoritative biography, critically review the figure’s contribution to their field(s), and research the ramifications and applications of their contributions (such as social, political, or religious). Restricted to Honors College students with sophomore standing or above.

HON 315 — Art and Value: Aesthetics Old and New, 4 credits
Examines historical approaches to aesthetics – the philosophy and theory of “beauty” and “art.” We discuss the origins of aesthetic philosophy in the eighteenth century and explore select philosophers, artists, and historians of the nineteenth through twenty-first centuries whose ideas have been central to the ways in which we look and talk about art and life. Incorporates a multi-disciplinary approach to the theory, meaning, and production of art.

HON 317 — Politics, Institutions, and Society, 4 credits
Explores the normative complexities involved in the interplay between individuals, institutions, and public policy issues in modern democracy. Examines this using some of the weightiest challenges we face today, such as climate change, dilemmas of stem cell research, and hunger and health. Ethical, social, and political implications for citizens in the context of a civil society are addressed. Class limited to Honors College students.

HON 319 — Science, Sustainability and Nature, 4 credits
Examines critical issues facing society that relate to science, nature, or sustainability. Issues are explored from scientific, historical, cultural, economic, and social perspectives. Analyzes nature, origins, and ethical concerns of selected problems or conflicts. Class limited to Honors College students.


HSE

 

New Courses

HSE 101 — University Foundations, 4 credits
Introduces students to writing, speaking, critical thinking, and research at the college level. Students read challenging texts; discuss and present various positions on complex issues; write organized persuasive and argumentative essays with focused claim and well-developed support; evaluate, integrate, and document outside sources; learn rhetorical strategies for various audiences; and demonstrate control of standard academic English. This course is the first of year 1 of the House Experience, which provides a distinctive, multi-year cohort experience with an interdisciplinary, theme-based curriculum centered on connected ideas and collaborative learning interactions. Approved for University Studies (Communication-Strand A; Thinking Goals-Strand B; Information Literacy-Strand C).

HSE 102 — University Foundations, 4 credits
Continues the sequenced 3-term academic course in writing, speaking, critical thinking, and research. Students choose appropriate topics and issues to research related to the theme of the House; use various research strategies to find, evaluate, and integrate authoritative information and data, including academic databases; write and revise extended researched and argumentative essays; hone citation and documentation skills (MLA, APA, or Chicago); design and deliver a formal presentation of research; extend rhetorical knowledge of context, purpose, and audience; demonstrate control of standard academic English. This course is the second of year 1 of the House Experience, which provides a distinctive, multi-year cohort experience with an interdisciplinary, theme-based curriculum centered on connected ideas and collaborative learning interactions. Approved for University Studies (Communication-Strand A; Thinking Goals-Strand B; Information Literacy-Strand C). Prerequisite(s): Completion of HSE 101 with a C- or better.

HSE 103 — University Foundations, 4 credits
Completes the sequenced 3-term academic course in writing, speaking, critical thinking, and research. Students demonstrate and apply knowledge of topic/content area through speaking opportunities and formal writing; use appropriate rhetorical strategies to support an argumentative or position-based thesis; extend analytical and reasoned argumentation to ethical, social, cultural, and/or global issues; demonstrate capabilities of extensive writing and revision strategies; demonstrate control of standard academic English with added fluency and style. This course is the third of year 1 of the House Experience, which provides a distinctive, multi-year cohort experience with an interdisciplinary, theme-based curriculum centered on connected ideas and collaborative learning interactions. Approved for University Studies (Communication-Strand A; Thinking Goals-Strand B; Information Literacy-Strand C). Prerequisite(s): Completion of HSE 102 with a C- or better.


HST

 

New Courses

HST 338 — Travelers and Voyages, 4 credits
Explores the mutual discovery of peoples formerly separated by great distances and difficult passages, engaging encounters like those between Muslim and Christian pilgrims, Asian and European Merchants, and New World and Old World subjects of European Empires. Readings for this course include the extant letters, journals, and atlases of pilgrims, merchants, and explorers, where possible pairing the accounts of travelers from different cultures (e. g. Ibn-Battuta and Marco Polo). Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 339 — World Renaissance and Reformation, 4 credits
Explores the remarkable development in European arts, architecture, scholarship and technology known as the Renaissance as a much broader global encounter between peoples and ideas. Examines the battles over religion in Europe known as the Reformation in a much wider context including the colonial world. Reveals how the Renaissance and Reformation were much more than European phenomena each unfolding in a time of commerce and intellectual exchange that linked educated European elites both to Mediterranean antiquity and to a wider world of merchants, writers, and rulers from other literate civilizations. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 345 — Atlantic World I: Spain, Portugal, Africa and the Caribbean, 700-1500, 4 credits
The first of a three course sequence exploring the historical interactions among Europe, Africa, and the Americas, this one focuses on the relationships between religions and ethnicities in Iberia as a formative influence on Spanish and Portuguese exploration and settlement in the Canaries, Azores, West Africa and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 346 — Atlantic World II: Colonial Latin America 1500-1750, 4 credits
Addresses Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the American mainland, the expansion and transformation of Christianity, and the development of a colonial economy within new global trade networks. Explores the relationship between the Christian re-conquest of Iberia and the European conquest of the Americas, as well as the complex question of how peoples of the eastern and western hemispheres viewed each other across the increasingly permeable boundary of the Atlantic. Special attention will be paid formation of governments, religious practices, and diplomatic systems that combined African, Indian, and European traditions. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 347 — Atlantic World III: Republicanism, Independence and Abolition, 1750-1900, 4 credits
Examines the end of colonial governance, revolutionary movements, the formation of new republican states, the social transformations that accompanied the abolition of slavery and the end of Indian governments throughout Latin America all as they unfold in the shadow of U.S. independence, the French revolution, and the Napoleonic occupation of Iberia. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 348 — Marx and Jesus in Latin America, 4 credits
Explores the alternately antagonistic and supportive roles of the two principle ideological forces shaping Latin America: Christianity and Marxism. Critically examines their capacity to inspire selfless moral acts and excuse atrocities. Begins by examining Christian ideas about property and ethics in the colonial period, then turns to the origins of modern, secular, liberal economies in the nineteenth century and the consequent debates among Marxists and Christians over property, the stages of history, the legitimacy of state authority, and the standards of just war. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 409 — Practicum, 1-15 credits
(repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits)

HST 466 — Indigenous Elites of the Americas, 15th-19th Century, 4 credits
Examines the indigenous political and intellectual leaders of the early modern history of the Americas during the centuries of conquest and colonization who made a place for themselves within a new colonial society. Indian intellectuals wrote in Latin, Nahuatl, Spanish and Quechua. Indian leaders argued cases before the courts, petitioned the political authority of Europe and led armies of conquest to bring new lands under the Spanish Empire. Addresses Spanish, Portuguese, French, and English subjects and client states with a special emphasis on the urban Indian elites of Peru and Mexico. Prerequisites: HST 110, 111.

HST 509 — Practicum, 1-15 credits
(repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits)

Modified Courses

HST 352 — History of Latin America– Rename Modern Latin America; rewrite description to change in focus. New description: Examines the political and cultural life of modern Latin America, including political economy, literature, visual arts, religion, and the conditions of daily life in the region. Explores attempts to enhance economic growth as well as efforts to redress historic inequality in a region that vacillated between republican and authoritarian forms of government while operating under the shadow of European colonial power and the United States.

HST 464 — Colonial Mexico– Omit prerequisites; modify description: Examines the great Mesoamerican civilizations, the period of Spanish conquest, and the colonial society that emerged from these European and indigenous-American cultures. Emphasizes the history of the colony state, the Church, class, caste, and modern memory of the colonial age. Readings include primary sources such as Spanish and indigenous conquest narratives, missionary chronicles, and inquisition records; as well as secondary histories, scholarly monographs, and journal articles.

HST 590 — Topics in World History– Change credits to 1-8 credits (repeatable with varying topics).

Deleted Courses

HST 350 — History of Latin America (Suspended)

HST 351 — History of Latin America (Suspended)

HST 465 — Modern Mexico (Suspended)


MBA

 

Modified Courses

MBA 590 — Capstone– Modify description; remove prerequisites.


MM

 

Modified Courses

MM 509 — Practicum– No more than 6 credits may be taken for credit [not a new requirement, but not displaying correctly in catalog].

MM 583 — Sustainable Organizational Leadership– Rename Sustainability Leadership.

Deleted Courses

MM 522 — Orientation to Capstone Experience (Suspended)


MS

 

New Courses

MS 180 — Army Physical Readiness, 1 credit
Instruction is designed to build and maintain cardiovascular fitness and core body strength of students. Students will develop personal leadership while working in a team environment. Open enrollment.

MS 192 — Freshman Leadership Laboratory Lab I, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 122.

MS 193 — Freshman Leadership Laboratory Lab II, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Open enrollment. Corerequisite: MS 123.

MS 291 — Sophomore Leadership Laboratory Lab I, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students with some military experience or completion of MS I classes. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 221.

MS 292 — Sophomore Leadership Laboratory Lab II, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students with some military experience or completion of MS I classes. Open enrollment. Corerequisite: MS 222.

MS 293 — Sophomore Leadership Laboratory Lab III, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students with some military experience or completion of MS I classes. Open enrollment. Corerequisite: MS 223.

MS 391 — Junior Leadership Laboratory Lab I, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to attend Leader Development and Assessment Course, LDAC. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students who have completed Army Basic Training, Leaders Training Course, or all MS I and MS II courses. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 321.

MS 392 — Junior Leadership Laboratory Lab II, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to attend Leader Development and Assessment Course, LDAC. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students who have completed Army Basic Training, Leaders Training Course, or all MS I and MS II courses. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 322.

MS 393 — Junior Leadership Laboratory Lab III, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to attend Leader Development and Assessment Course, LDAC. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for students who have completed Army Basic Training, Leaders Training Course, or all MS I and MS II courses. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 323.

MS 491 — Senior Leadership Laboratory Lab I, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to receive commissions as U.S. Army lieutenants. MS IV cadets develop training plans and implement the Army staff processes in teaching scenarios to junior cadets. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills in themselves and other cadets. Students teach various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for senior students who have completed the Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 421.

MS 492 — Senior Leadership Laboratory Lab II, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to receive commissions as U.S. Army lieutenants. MS IV cadets develop training plans and implement the Army staff processes in teaching scenarios to junior cadets. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills in themselves and other cadets. Students teach various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for senior students who have completed the Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 422.

MS 493 — Senior Leadership Laboratory Lab III, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in contracted students preparing to receive commissions as U.S. Army lieutenants. MS IV cadets develop training plans and implement the Army staff processes in teaching scenarios to junior cadets. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students participate in leadership responsibilities to assess and develop skills in themselves and other cadets. Students teach various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Covers practical knowledge in first aid, water survival, and land navigation. Primarily conducted in an outdoor setting. Designed for senior students who have completed the Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Open enrollment. Corequisite: MS 423.


MTH

 

New Courses

MTH 461E — Analysis of Variance, 4 credits
Introduces various statistical models and planning approaches used in the design of experimental and observational studies. Topics will be chosen from One Factor and Multi-Factor Models, Analysis of Covariance, Random and Mixed Effect Models, and Repeated Measure Models. Prerequisite: MTH 361.

MTH 561E — Analysis of Variance, 4 credits
Introduces various statistical models and planning approaches used in the design of experimental and observational studies. Topics will be chosen from One Factor and Multi-Factor Models, Analysis of Covariance, Random and Mixed Effect Models, and Repeated Measure Models. Prerequisite: MTH 361.

Modified Courses

MTH 251 — Calculus I– Add “related rates” to applications included in description.

MTH 361 — Probability– Add to description “MTH 281 recommended.”

MTH 421B — Optimization– Remove CS 200 and 257 as recommended courses; replace with “MTH 271 or CS 257 is recommended.”

MTH 461A — Multivariate Statistical Analysis– MTH 261 strongly recommended.

MTH 461 — Topics in Probability and StatisticsMTH 461C — Financial Mathematics

MTH 461C — Financial Mathematics– Change prerequisites to MTH 281 and MTH 361; MTH 321 is recommended.

MTH 461D — Actuarial Mathematics– Change prerequisites to MTH 281 and MTH 361.

MTH 521B — Optimization– Remove CS 200 and 257 as recommended courses; replace with “MTH 271 or CS 257 is recommended.”

MTH 561A — Multivariate Statistical Analysis– MTH 261 strongly recommended.

MTH 561 — Topics in Probability and StatisticsMTH 561C — Financial Mathematics

MTH 561C — Financial Mathematics– Change prerequisites to MTH 281 and MTH 361; MTH 321 is recommended.

MTH 561D — Actuarial Mathematics– Change prerequisites to MTH 281 and MTH 361.

Deleted Courses

MTH 158 — Elementary Linear Mathematics with Applications (Suspended)


MUS

 

New Courses

MUS 386 — Cascade Clarinet Consort, 1 credit
The Cascade Clarinet Consort (CCC) is a collaborative learning environment for students, faculty, and staff at Southern Oregon University. Students will perform, arrange, compose and commission music of all styles and musical periods. The course is open to students who play clarinet.

MUS 387 — Siskiyou Saxophone Orchestra, 1 credit
The Siskiyou Saxophone Orchestra (SSO) is a collaborative learning environment for students, faculty, and staff at Southern Oregon University. Students will perform, arrange, compose and commission music of all styles and musical periods. The course is open to students who play saxophone.

MUS 388 — SOU Percussion Ensemble, 1 credit
The SOU Percussion Ensemble is dedicated to the performance of contemporary percussion repertoire and providing the ensemble members with a variety of percussive experiences.  Repertoire ranges from contemporary classical to world traditions to jazz and rock inspired compositions. The ensemble gives three full concerts at the university each year as well as many performances throughout the university, the Southern Oregon community, and the Pacific Northwest.  The ensemble also reads and performs works by student composers as a resource to the composition program at SOU.

MUS 504 — Comprehensive Exam Preparation, 2 credits
Students must pass a comprehensive exam upon completion of all core courses. The exam should be taken during the same term in which the solo recital is given (at the end of the second year for full time students). The content and requirements of the comprehensive exam are defined by the student’s area of focus. Prerequisite: instructor permission. Co-requisite: MUS 551.

MUS 510 — Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music, 3 credits
Students will engage in a comprehensive review of research materials available for advanced studies in music performance and conducting. Topics include music dictionaries and encyclopedias (generalized and specialized); indices for journals, theses, dissertations, and research abstracts; collected works and historical anthologies; electronic resources; library resources; and writing style and format. Prerequisite: enrollment in the master of music program, or instructor permission.

MUS 511 — Special topics in Pedagogy, 3 credits
Students will engage in a comprehensive review of instructional techniques, materials, and performance techniques for teaching private studio lessons. Areas of study may include clarinet, French horn, percussion, piano, saxophone, trumpet, and voice. Prerequisite for Music: admission into the Master of Music program.

MUS 512 — Special Topics in Literature, 3 credits
Students will conduct a comprehensive examination of musical literature for their major instrument or voice, from the instrument’s inception to the present. The course is designed to enhance knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of a wide variety of composers and styles. Prerequisite for Music: admission into the Master of Music program.

MUS 586 — Cascade Clarinet Consort, 1 credit
The Cascade Clarinet Consort (CCC) is a collaborative learning environment for students, faculty, and staff at Southern Oregon University. Students will perform, arrange, compose and commission music of all styles and musical periods. The course is open to students who play clarinet.

MUS 587 — Siskiyou Saxophone Orchestra, 1 credit
The Siskiyou Saxophone Orchestra (SSO) is a collaborative learning environment for students, faculty, and staff at Southern Oregon University. Students will perform, arrange, compose and commission music of all styles and musical periods. The course is open to students who play saxophone.

MUS 588 — SOU Percussion Ensemble, 1 credit
The SOU Percussion Ensemble is dedicated to the performance of contemporary percussion repertoire and providing the ensemble members with a variety of percussive experiences.  Repertoire ranges from contemporary classical to world traditions to jazz and rock inspired compositions. The ensemble gives three full concerts at the university each year as well as many performances throughout the university, the Southern Oregon community, and the Pacific Northwest.  The ensemble also reads and performs works by student composers as a resource to the composition program at SOU.

Modified Courses

MUS 195 — Symphonic Band– Rename Wind Ensemble.

MUS 355 — Electronic and Computer Music– Add cross-listings with ART 365 and EMDA 365.

MUS 395 — Symphonic Band– Rename Wind Ensemble.

MUS 595 — Symphonic Band– Rename Wind Ensemble.


NAS

 

New Courses

NAS 399 — Special Studies, 1-6 credits
credits to be arranged

NAS 405 — Reading and Conference, 1-6 credits
credits to be arranged

NAS 440 — American Indian Identities, 4 credits
Provides a multidisciplinary perspective on American Indian identities today, including the question of who or what even counts as "Indian," and why. Topics include historical and contemporary perspectives from political, ethnic, cultural, and legal standpoints, both from within indigenous communities and in wider society. Upper division standing required. Approved for University Studies Integration (Strand J).

NAS 505 — Reading and Conference, 1-8 credits
Credits to be arranged.

NAS 540 — American Indian Identities, 4 credits
Provides a multidisciplinary perspective on American Indian identities today, including the question of who or what even counts as "Indian," and why. Topics include historical and contemporary perspectives from political, ethnic, cultural, and legal standpoints, both from within indigenous communities and in wider society. Graduate standing required.


OAL

 

New Courses

OAL 170 — Bike Maintenance, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in bicycle maintenance and repair, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 171 — Boat Maintenance, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills required to maintain and repair equipment used in the facilitation of whitewater trips, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 172 — Fly Fishing I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in fly fishing, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 173 — Fly Fishing II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in fly fishing, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 172.

OAL 174 — Hiking, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in hiking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 175 — Mountaineering I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in mountaineering, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 176 — Mountain Biking, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in mountain biking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 177 — Rock Climbing I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills and fitness in rock climbing, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 178 — Sea Kayaking I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in sea kayaking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 179 — Skiing/Snowboarding, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in skiing or snowboarding (student’s choice), in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 180 — Ski and Snowboard Maintenance, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in ski and snowboard maintenance and repair, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 181 — Whitewater Activities I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in whitewater rafting and inflatable kayaking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 182 — Whitewater Kayaking I, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in whitewater kayaking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics.

OAL 203 — Mountaineering II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which builds on the technical skills developed in Mountaineering I and provides the opportunity of facilitation, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 175.

OAL 204 — Rock Climbing II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which builds on the technical skills and fitness developed in Rock Climbing I and provides the opportunity of facilitation, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 177.

OAL 205 — Rock Climbing III, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills and facilitation techniques for leading group rock climbing and education. This course also focuses on risk management, teaching techniques, as well as environmental and social ethics. Prerequisites: OAL 177 and OAl 204.

OAL 206 — Sea Kayaking II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in sea kayaking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 178.

OAL 207 — Whitewater Activities II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which builds on the technical skills developed in Whitewater I and provides the opportunity of facilitation, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 181.

OAL 208 — Whitewater Kayaking II, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in whitewater kayaking, in conjunction with risk management and environmental and social ethics. Prerequisite: OAL 182.

OAL 234 — Scuba Diving, 3 credits
Covers technical skills using scuba gear in the swimming pool and explores theory practice regarding physics, physiology, and safe diving practices. Students provide their own masks, snorkels, and fins. Asthma and other serious health conditions require a medical release. Students will have the opportunity to pursue an open water certification after successful completion of this course. Prerequisite(s): Adequate swimming ability as determined by the instructor.

OAL 236 — Advanced Scuba, 2 credits
Refines basic diving skills and introduces rescue techniques such as self-rescue, diver stress, emergency management, and search and recovery. Promotes diving as a safe and fulfilling lifetime activity. Prerequisite: OAL 234.

OAL 480 — Swiftwater Rescue Technician Level I, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a swiftwater and flood environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions.

OAL 481 — Technical Rope Rescue, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a high and low angle environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions.

OAL 482 — Swiftwater Rescue Technician Advanced, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a swiftwater and flood environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions. Prerequisites: OAL 480 and OAL 481.

OAL 495 — Outdoor Pursuits Field Experience, 6 credits
Offers students practical experience with planning and facilitating outdoor adventure field trips. Students learn the history, principles, and practical application of outdoor pursuit theory and gain experience in activities such as rock climbing, rappelling, backpacking, whitewater activities and scuba diving.

OAL 580 — Swiftwater Rescue Technician Level I, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a swiftwater and flood environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions.

OAL 581 — Technical Rope Rescue, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a high and low angle environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions.

OAL 582 — Swiftwater Rescue Technician Advanced, 2 credits
Designed for students and professionals who will be required to carry out rescues in a swiftwater and flood environment, including emergency services personnel, search and rescue teams, river guides, and others. The course is based on the philosophy of self-protection and application of low to high risk solutions. Prerequisites: OAL 580 and OAL 581.

OAL 595 — Outdoor Pursuits Field Experience, 6 credits
Offers students practical experience with planning and facilitating outdoor adventure field trips. Students learn the history, principles, and practical application of outdoor pursuit theory and gain experience in activities such as rock climbing, rappelling, backpacking, whitewater activities and scuba diving.

Modified Courses

OAL 275 — Adventure-Based Facilitation– Remove OAL co-requisite.


PE

 

New Courses

PE 170 — Open Lap Swim, 1 credit
This is an activity-based class, which develops technical skills in lap swimming.

PE 171 — Cardio Swim Fitness, 1 credit
Provides students with instruction and technique for using swimming for exercise.

PE 172 — Water Polo, 1 credit
Provides students instruction and play time for the sport of water polo.

PE 182 — Introduction to Modern Dance, 2 credits
Explores technique, improvisation and compositional components of modern dance for beginning and experienced dancers. Also covers techniques to strengthen and stretch your body and creativity. Students will learn basic modern dance technique and form, explore partnering skills, and play with improvisational structures both individually and in groups. Students will be given a prompt by the instructor and guided through the development of a movement phrase for the final exam. Dancers will present their phrase for the final exam. Cross-listed with TA 182 and D 182.

PE 183 — Dance Improvisation, 2 credits
Utilizing the elements of dance, this class investigates movement through structured explorations for the creative development of personal movement repertoire, spontaneous group interaction, and observation skills. The course emphasizes the exploration of movement through spur-of-the-moment problem solving and creative risk-taking. This course is designed to evoke the student’s creative movement individuality and sense of ensemble. It may also include weight-sharing and contact improvisation. Cross-listed with TA 183 and D 183.

PE 479 — Nutrition for Training and Performance, 3 credits
Focuses on nutrition and training strategies for athletic performance with an emphasis on pre-training/race and recovery foods, substrate utilization, nutrient supplementation for the immune system, supplements to enhance strength training and endurance activities, fluid replacement, training zones, periodization, overtraining syndrome, rest and recovery, race preparation, and preparation for competition at different environmental conditions including altitude and heat. The course also addresses specific nutrient needs for endurance and power athletes, as well as nutrition and training strategies for young and older athletes.

PE 579 — Nutrition for Training and Performance, 3 credits
Focuses on nutrition and training strategies for athletic performance with an emphasis on pre-training/race and recovery foods, substrate utilization, nutrient supplementation for the immune system, supplements to enhance strength training and endurance activities, fluid replacement, training zones, periodization, overtraining syndrome, rest and recovery, race preparation, and preparation for competition at different environmental conditions including altitude and heat. The course also addresses specific nutrient needs for endurance and power athletes, as well as nutrition and training strategies for young and older athletes.

Modified Courses

PE 298 — Lifeguard Training– Remove prerequisite of PE 297.

PE 309 — Practicum– Remove repeatability.

PE 361 — Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries I– Remove prerequisite of BI 231.

PE 362 — Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries II– Remove prerequisite of BI 231.

PE 372 — Kinesiology– Remove prerequisite of BI 231.

PE 476 — Exercise Prescription and Graded Exercise Testing– Remove prerequisite of BI 231.

Deleted Courses

PE 180 — Physical Education

PE 195 — Holistic Fitness I, II, III

PE 196 — Team Participation

PE 197 — T’ai Chi Chuan

PE 198 — Meditation I

PE 234 — Scuba Diving

PE 236 — Advanced Scuba

PE 365 — Coaching and Officiating Football

PE 366 — Coaching and Officiating Basketball

PE 370 — Coaching and Officiating Volleyball


PEA

 

New Courses

PEA 180 — Physical Education, 1 credit
Students learn and improve recreational skills for maintaining an optimum level of physical fitness. For a list of activities currently being offered, consult the online class schedule.

[these PEA courses were created from PE-prefix courses. See also Health and Physical Education.]

PEA 195 — Holistic Fitness I, II, III , 1 credit
Incorporates physical exercises for the body and energy exercises for the mind to create a peaceful, productive, and creative brain. Explores the basic principles of brain respiration, which teaches how to effectively release physical blockages, emotional stress, and negative, limiting thoughts. Prerequisite(s): Must take in sequence.

[converted from PE 195]

PEA 196 — Team Participation , 1 credit
Team Participation.

[converted from PE 196]

PEA 197 — T’ai Chi Chuan , 1 credit
Introduces the ancient Chinese system of self-defense, primarily practiced today for its benefits in terms of exercise, flexibility, and inner calm. Focuses on a dance-like series of slow movements that build balance, strength, and coordination.

[converted from PE 197]

PEA 198 — Meditation I , 1 credit
Introduces students to meditation, which is used throughout the world to promote spiritual growth and assist with mental clarity. Designed to benefit the student both physically and mentally. Teaches basic yoga postures and energizing techniques to help students develop their own daily practice routine.

[converted from PE 198]

PEA 365 — Coaching and Officiating Football , 3 credits
Involves a demonstration and discussion of the fundamentals, team play, and rules of football. Emphasizes the development, organization, and conduct of a football program.

[converted from PE 365]

PEA 366 — Coaching and Officiating Basketball , 3 credits
Demonstrates and discusses the fundamentals, individual skills, and methods of instruction.

[converted from PE 366]

PEA 370 — Coaching and Officiating Volleyball , 3 credits
Covers the techniques and theory of coaching competitive volleyball.

[converted from PE 370]


PH

 

New Courses

PH 102 — Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation II, 2 credits
Examines communication, problem-solving, and computer literacy skills in physical sciences and engineering. This series is required for all areas of Physics. Cross-listed with ENGR 102.

PH 103 — Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation III, 2 credits
Focuses on problem solving and computer programming skills in physical sciences and engineering. Cross-listed with ENGR 103.

Modified Courses

PH 336 — Optics Laboratory– Increase to 2 credits.

PH 341 — Modern Physics– Rename Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Physics.

PH 361 — Digital Electronics– Increase to 5 credits.

PH 362 — Analog Electronics– Increase to 5 credits.

PH 475 — Nanoparticles and Nanoparticle Technology– Rename Nanophysics and Nanotechnology.


PHL

 

New Courses

PHL 101 — Physical Sciences and Engineering Orientation I, 2 credits
Introduces physical sciences and engineering curricula, career paths, ethics, problem solving, communication, and computer programming. This series is required for all areas of Physics. Cross-listed with ENGR 101.

PHL 207 — Philosophy of Sport, 4 credits
Examines sport at the conceptual level, using an engaging, topics-based, introduction to philosophy and sports. Considers questions concerning the nature of sport, contemporary issues surrounding sports and values, such as fairness – both in competition and in athlete training (steroids, genetic treatments, etc), the use of sport and athletes for profit, and ethical issues concerning the place of sports in the American academy. Considers the politics of sports and the athlete, discussing race, sex, and gender in sports. Approved for University Studies Explorations – Strand E


PSY

 

New Courses

PSY 318 — Personal Development: Individual Exploration, 1 credit
Experiential course focused on personal growth and self-discovery. The course consists of an organizational meeting of all participants during the first week of the term and final exam week; an initial interview to mutually determine suitability for the course and to establish goals; weekly, one-hour consultation sessions with a counselor-in-training during the term; and keeping a journal that captures learning experiences and insights across the term . Counselors-in-training are first-year graduate students in the Mental Health Counseling Program; they receive supervision throughout the term. Suggested for students wishing to ensure personal success at SOU and for those planning to enter the helping professions. May be taken twice.

PSY 319 — Personal Development: Group Exploration, 1 credit
Experiential course focusing on interpersonal growth and self-discovery in the context of a group of peers. The course consists of an organizational meeting of all participants during the first week of the term and final exam week; an initial interview to mutually determine suitability for the course and to establish goals; eight, weekly, two-hour group sessions facilitated by counselors-in-training during the term; and keeping a journal that captures learning experiences and insights across the term . Counselors-in-training are first-year graduate students in the Mental Health Counseling Program; they receive supervision throughout the term. Suggested for students wishing to ensure personal success at SOU and for those planning to enter the helping professions. May be taken twice

PSY 406 — Teaching Assistantship , 1-6 credits
[formerly PSY 416] Students explore the process of teaching psychology by working closely with an instructor. May involve any aspect of teaching, including literature research, laboratory demonstrations, tutoring, lecture presentations, leading discussion groups, paper-grading, and grade-recording. Repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent.

Modified Courses

PSY 228 — Methods, Statistics, and Applications I– Modify description. Prerequisite will be MTH 243.

PSY 229 — Methods, Statistics, and Applications II– Modify description.

PSY 334 — Social Psychology– Remove recommended courses.

PSY 370 — Lifespan Development– Add PSY 201 as alternative prerequisite.

PSY 416 — Teaching Assistantship– Renumber PSY 406.

PSY 437 — Creative Thinking– Add prerequisite of PSY 202.

PSY 439 — Group Facilitation and Assessment– Rename Group Facilitation; change PSY 438/538 from prerequisite to “prerequisite or corequisite”.

PSY 445 — Organizational Psychology– Remove SOC 204 as recommended course; add PSY 202 as prerequisite.

Deleted Courses

PSY 416 — Teaching Assistantship


READ

 

New Courses

READ 535 — Language and Literacy in the Content Areas
[formerly READ 533]

Modified Courses

READ 533 — Language and Literacy in the Content Areas 3-12– Renumber READ 535.

Deleted Courses

READ 533 — Language and Literacy in the Content Areas


SOC

 

Deleted Courses

SOC 241 — Elementary Statistics for the Social Sciences

SOC 338 — Contemporary Issues in Native North America


SSPC

 

New Courses

SSPC 440 — Social Activism: History, Method, Practice, 4 credits
Explores the meaning of social activism through analysis of models and case studies of social action and the history of social activism and social change movements. Examines organizational and interpretive methodologies related to social activism in different sociocultural and historical contexts. Discusses construction of vision, goals, and criteria for assessing success in social justice and change movements. Includes aspects of social, cultural, political economy and political ecology theory related to social movements. Guides students in examining their own experiences with social activism and social change movements. Includes limited community-based research, and practice in conceptualizing and constructing a social action campaign. Community-based learning course.

Modified Courses

SSPC 199, 399, 401 405, 407, 501, 505, 507. — SSPC 409 and 509

SSPC 409 and 509 — Will be 1-4 credits and repeatable, with this note: No more than 4 credits per term, repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.

will be 1-4 credits and repeatable, with this note: No more than 4 credits per term, repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.TA 130 — Technical Theatre Fundamentals

Deleted Courses

SSPC 241 — Elementary Statistics for the Social Sciences


TA

 

New Courses

TA 182 — Introduction to Modern Dance, 2 credits
Explores technique, improvisation and compositional components of modern dance for beginning and experienced dancers. Also covers techniques to strengthen and stretch your body and creativity. Students will learn basic modern dance technique and form, explore partnering skills, and play with improvisational structures both individually and in groups. Students will be given a prompt by the instructor and guided through the development of a movement phrase for the final exam. Dancers will present their phrase for the final exam. Cross-listed with D 182 and PE 182.

TA 183 — Dance Improvisation, 2 credits
Utilizing the elements of dance, this class investigates movement through structured explorations for the creative development of personal movement repertoire, spontaneous group interaction, and observation skills. The course emphasizes the exploration of movement through spur-of-the-moment problem solving and creative risk-taking. This course is designed to evoke the student’s creative movement individuality and sense of ensemble. It may also include weight-sharing and contact improvisation. Cross-listed with D 183 and PE 183.

TA 240 — Stagecraft, 3 credits
Further examines the principles of stage scenery construction, including theatre terminology, tools, materials, woodworking, shop practices and related areas. Mixed lecture and hands-on instruction. Prerequisite: TA 130.

TA 249 — Costume Fundamentals
[formerly TA 146] Continuation of the basic principles of theatrical costuming. Explores both construction and design through lecture and lab. Students will complete a construction/sewing project and produce a set of costume sketches as final projects. Prerequisites: TA 131 or TA 132. Restricted to majors.

TA 484 — Computer Aided Design for Theatre, 3 credits
Continues to develop skills established in TA 344 Drafting for Theatre with much greater emphasis in computer generated 3d models and rendering techniques primarily using Vectorworks, a leading CAD software in the entertainment industry. The class will also explore Photoshop, SketchUp and other widely used programs in order to create powerful communication tools for artists, designers and technicians in the arts. Prerequisite: TA 344.

Modified Courses

TA 130 — Technical Theatre Fundamentals– Stagecraft/Stage Lighting – remove requirement of registration for a lab section; restricted to theatre arts majors.

TA 131 — Technical Theatre Fundamentals– Costumes/Scene Painting – restricted to theatre majors.

TA 132 — Technical Theatre Fundamentals– Costumes/Theatre Sound – restricted to theatre majors.

TA 144 — Stagecraft– Renumber TA 240; modify description; prerequisite TA 130; remove TA 144L corequisite.

TA 146 — Costume Fundamentals– Renumber TA 249; slight description modification; no corequisite.

TA 147 — Introduction to the Theatre: Drama in Production– Restricted to Theatre Arts majors.

TA 166 — Theatre Foundations– Not required for pre-majors.

TA 167 — Script Analysis– Not required for premajors.

TA 169 — Elements of Design– Not required for premajors.

TA 221 — Voice and Movement I– Remove TA 281 corequisite.

TA 222 — Movement for the Actor II– Remove TA 227 and TA 228 corequisites.

TA 223 — Movement for the Actor III– Remove the TA 228 and TA 283 corequisites.

TA 227 — Voice and Speech for the Stage II– Remove the TA 223 and TA 283 corerequisites.

TA 228 — Voice and Speech for the Stage III– Remove the TA 223 and TA 283 corequisites.

TA 243 — Scene Design II, Techniques– Change prerequisites to TA 130, TA 131 or TA 132, TA 167.

TA 244 — Stage Properties– Remove TA 144 prerequisite and substitute TA 130.

TA 246 — Introduction to Acting– Open to non-theatre majors; remove pre-majors.

TA 252 — Stage Makeup– Change prerequisites to TA 131 or TA 132.

TA 262 — Costume Design– Change prerequisites to TA 131 or TA 132 or TA 146 or TA 249.

TA 263 — Costume Design– Change prerequisite to TA 262.

TA 264 — Costume Design– Change prerequisite to TA 263.

TA 266 — Costume Construction– Change prerequisites to TA 131 or TA 132 or TA 146 or TA 249.

TA 267 — Costume Construction– Change prerequisite to TA 266.

TA 268 — Costume Construction– Change prerequisite to TA 267.

TA 281 — Acting I: Beginning Acting– Remove corequisite of TA 221.

TA 282 — Acting II: Classical Drama– Remove corequisites of TA 222 and 227.

TA 283 — Acting III: Modern Drama– Remove corequisites of TA 223 and 228; correct typo in title.

TA 321 — Acting Shakespeare I– Remove corequisite of TA 382.

TA 322 — Acting Shakespeare II– Remove corequisite of TA 383.

TA 327 — Voice and speech for the Stage IV– Remove corequisite of TA 381.

TA 346 — Costume Crafts– Change prerequisites to TA 131 or TA 132.

TA 366 — Advanced Costume Construction– Remove TA 266 and 267 prerequisites.

TA 381 — Acting IV: American Drama– Remove corequisite of TA 327.

TA 382 — Acting V: Contemporary Drama– Remove TA 321 corerequisite.

TA 383 — Acting VI: 21st Century Performance– Remove TA 322 corequisite.

TA 444 — Advanced Stagecraft– Change prerequisite to TA 244.

TA 462 — Advanced Costume Design– Remove prerequisites TA 262 and 263.

TA 463 — Advanced Costume Design– Remove prerequisites TA 262, 263, 264; change prerequisite to TA 462.

Deleted Courses

TA 144 — Stagecraft

TA 144L — Stagecraft Lab

TA 146 — Costume Fundamentals

TA 146L — Costume Fundamentals Lab


VP

 

New Courses

VP 215R — Digital Media Foundations - Recitation, 2 credits
Students complete projects applying techniques in video production. Co-requisite VP 215. Cross-list with EMDA 202R.

VP 272 — Intermediate Video Production, 4 credits
Students will learn intermediate level skills and techniques in film and television production. Through lectures, readings, and short video projects, students will gain knowledge of standard production workflows. During the course of the term, students will practice strategies in producing and directing in studio and remote environments, developing, scripting, prepping, shooting and editing group video projects. Prerequisites: VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 172.

VP 372E — Advanced Production: Broadcast Journalism, 4 credits
Students will focus on producing and directing live and taped multicamera studio programming for cable casting on Digital Media Center channels and streaming on the internet. Students will work with Journalism students to develop, shoot, edit and cablecast SOU newscasts. Students will practice strategies in producing and directing in studio and remote environments, and they will become adept in sophisticated camera and lighting techniques. Co-taught with Journalism faculty; students will work under the supervision of faculty and guest professionals. Prerequisites: VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R. Cross-listed with JRN 372.

Modified Courses

VP 172 — Studio Techniques for Video Production– Modify description.

VP 215 — Introduction to Field Production– Rename Digital Media Foundations and reduce to 2 credits; remove prerequisites; Co-requisite VP 215R. Cross-list with EMDA 202.

VP 312 — Scriptwriting– Change prerequisites to VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 315 — Advanced Field Production– Modify description. Add prerequisites VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 372A — Advanced Production Activities: Documentaries– Rename Advanced Production: Documentary. Change prerequisites to VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 372B — Advanced Production Activities: Mockumentaries– Rename Advanced Production: Mock-documentary. Change prerequisites to VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 372 — Advanced Production ActivitiesVP 372C — Advanced Production Activities: Informational and Promotional Video Production

VP 372C — Advanced Production Activities: Informational and Promotional Video Production– Rename Advanced Production: Informational and Promotional Video. Change prerequisites to VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 372D — Advanced Production Activities: Fictional Film– Rename Advanced Production: Fictional Film. Change prerequisites to VP 172, or VP 215 and VP 215R, or EMDA 202 and EMDA 202R, or VP 272.

VP 410 — Capstone for Video Production– Remove prerequisites of video production major or minor.


WR

 

New Courses

WR 220 — Imaginative Writing: Working (and Playing) with Words, 4 credits
Students explore creative writing strategies that reflect the language of today’s world, from advertising and tweets to blogs and songs. The text for the class is all around us: on walls and phones and computers and television, even in the ways we talk to each other. Students produce portfolios and professional resumes of work (and play). Approved for University Studies (Explorations Strand E – Humanities)

WR 280 — Public Reasoning: Introductory Topics in Rhetoric , 4 credits
[formerly WR 230]

WR 281 — Introductory Fiction Writing , 4 credits
[formerly WR 241]

WR 282 — Introductory Poetry Writing , 4 credits
[formerly WR 242]

WR 320 — Contemporary Literary Culture, 4 credits
Students read and respond to a selection of contemporary print and digital literary journals, explore past and present models of small press publication and literary community, and accelerate their own engagement in writing-based networks on the local level and beyond. Prerequisites: WR 280, 281, 282.

WR 380 — Intermediate Topics in Rhetoric, 4 credits
Introduces students to a range of contemporary critical methods in rhetoric, focusing on both theory and application. Of particular focus will be rhetorical theories about the nature of language and truth, especially as they relate to narrative and poetics. Repeatable for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: WR 280, 281, 282, and ENG 298.

WR 381 — Intermediate Fiction Writing
[formerly WR 330]

WR 382 — Intermediate Poetry Writing
[formerly WR 341]

WR 480 — Advanced Topics in Rhetoric, 4 credits
Focuses on rhetorical invention in relation to emerging media. Students will explore the communicative value of emerging media and learn to communicate with rhetorical purpose in mind, critically analyze, interpret and invent with multiple modes and methods of rhetoric and to learn to invent and express themselves through multivocal rhetorical inventions. Repeatable for credit with different topics. Prererquisites: WR 320, WR 380.

WR 481 — Advanced Fiction Writing
[formerly WR 430]

WR 482 — Advanced Poetry Writing
[formerly WR 441]

WR 580 — Advanced Topics in Rhetoric, 4 credits
Focuses on rhetorical invention in relation to emerging media. Students will explore the communicative value of emerging media and learn to communicate with rhetorical purpose in mind, critically analyze, interpret and invent with multiple modes and methods of rhetoric and to learn to invent and express themselves through multivocal rhetorical inventions. Repeatable for credit with different topics. Prerequisites: WR 320, WR 380.

Modified Courses

WR 230 — Introduction to Rhetoric– Renumber WR 280; and rename Public Reasoning: Introductory Topics in Rhetoric; modify description; no longer an Explorations Strand E course.

WR 241 — Introduction to Fiction Writing– Renumber WR 281; and rename Introductory Fiction Writing. No longer an Explorations Strand E course.

WR 242 — Introduction to Poetry Writing– Renumber WR 282; and rename Introductory Poetry Writing. No longer an Explorations Strand E course.

WR 330 — Fiction Writing– Renumber WR 381; rename Intermediate Fiction Writing. Modify description to include a grade of B- or higher in the prerequisite courses of WR 280, 281, and 282. New prerequisites are ENG 298, WR 280, 281, and 282.

WR 341 — Poetry Writing– Renumber WR 382; rename Intermediate Poetry Writing. Modify description; grade of B- or higher in all three lower-division courses WR 280, 281, and 282 required for admission. New prerequisites are ENG 298, WR 280, 281, 282.

WR 430 — Advanced Fiction Writing: Short Story– Renumber WR 481; rename Advanced Fiction Writing. Modify description. New prerequisites are ENG 298; WR 320 and 381.

WR 441 — Advanced Poetry Writing– Renumber WR 482; modify description. New prerequisites are ENG 298; WR 320, 382.

Deleted Courses

WR 230 — Introduction to Rhetoric

WR 241 — Introduction to Fiction Writing

WR 242 — Introduction to Poetry Writing

WR 330 — Fiction Writing

WR 341 — Poetry Writing

WR 350 — Topics in Nonfiction Essay

WR 420 — Beyond the Workshop

WR 430 — Advanced Fiction Writing: Short Story

WR 441 — Advanced Poetry Writing

WR 460 — Advanced Topics in Creative Nonfiction