Skip Navigation

Southern Oregon University


ANTHROPOLOGY

New Courses
ANTH 336 — Topics in Global/Local Interconnections, 4 credits (CIP 45.0299)
Explores one contemporary issue or topic using a holistic approach. Students trace local-global connections and the structural effects of personal choices through community-based research and case studies. Relationships among socio-economic institutions, individual behaviors, and cultural values and assumptions are critically examined. Emphasis is on global awareness, social action, sustainable resource use, and social justice. Repeat credit is allowed for different topics. Approved for University Studies (Integration).

Modified Courses
ANTH 409 — Practicum: Field Study – modify description.
ANTH 450 — Culture Change – modify description.
ANTH 451 — Ecology of Small Scale Societies – rename Cultural Ecology [approved in 07-08]; in prereqs, substitute ES 103 for ES social science sequence.
ANTH 460 — Applied Anthropology – modify description.

Changes to major
Anthropology Core courses: In Areas and Topics section, add ANTH 336 to course choices.

Changes to certificate
Certificate in Applied Cultural Anthropology – minor rewording. In Skills, update course number for GEOG 389 to GEOG 451. In Policy-Related Topics, omit GEOG 417 from list of courses. In Specialized Focus, update course titles for ANTH 409, 414. Certificate in Cultural Resource Management – in Knowledge and Skills, Geomorphology listed as ES/G 481; in Policy Perspectives, replace BI 383 with ES 421 and ES351.


APPLIED MULTIMEDIA

Changes to minor
Remove ART 250 (deleted course) from course choices.


ART & ART HISTORY

New Courses
ARTH 496 — Capstone, 4 credits (CIP 50.0703)
Senior project for BA art majors with an art history option, taken with the instructor in the student's concentration in art history. The capstone integrates the knowledge and skills of the discipline with a career-oriented project. Examples include: researching a topic and presenting a public lecture; organizing an exhibition for one of the university galleries; writing critical reviews. A final capstone report is submitted to, and kept in the Department office, accessible to students and faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

DMF 202 — Digital Media Foundations II, 2 credits (CIP 09.0702)
Lectures focus on the development and applications of time based media, including digital video and audio production. DMF 202 serves as a prerequisite or recommended course for several upper division classes in art, applied multimedia, computer science, photojournalism, and video production. Corequisite: DMF 202L.

DMF 202L — Digital Media Foundations II Lab, 2 credits (CIP 09.0702)
Students complete a series of projects exploring techniques in digital video, audio production and digital storytelling. Co-requisite: DMF 202.

Modified Courses
ART 255 — Introduction to Ceramics – omit throwing from description.
ART 332 — Intermediate Drawing – modify description.
ART 424/524 — Art Process and Education Theory – rename Art Process, Theory and Practicum in Art Education; reword description.
ART 429/529 — Issues in Art Education – reword description.
ART 455/555 — Advanced Ceramics – omit kiln references in description.
ART 496 — Capstone – does not count for art history concentration.
ARTH 431 — Italian Renaissance Art and Culture – approved for University Studies (Integration)

Note: omit ART 250 as prerequisite or recommended course, and replace with DMF 201/201L for the following courses: ART 304, 344, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 444.

Deleted Courses
ART 250 — Introduction to Digital Media

Changes to Major

  • Capstone: art history majors will complete ARTH 496.
  • Studio Art Option: in Lower Division (BA/BS and BFA), in Foundation/Introduction to Studio Practices, omit ART 250, replace with DMF 201, DMF 201L.
  • Art History Option: in Upper Division, change Capstone course to ARTH 496.

Changes to Minors
Add Applied Multimedia to list of minors.


ARTS & SCIENCES

New Courses
CAS 522 — Research and Assessment in Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, 3 credits
Develops the foundations built in CAS 521. First, it explores the nature of research and assessment questions and hypotheses in an interdisciplinary context. Second, it explores in-depth the practices used in quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research and assessment modalities. The course is available spring term only.

Modified Courses
CAS 520 — Introduction to Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies – change credits from 3 credits to 2 credits; modify description.
CAS 521 — Applying Interdisciplinary Theory – rename Applications in Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies; increase to 3 credits; modify description.


BIOLOGY

New Courses
BI 361 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I, 4 credits (CIP 51.1199)
Covers nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. Laboratory sections include identification of anatomical structures and analysis of physiological measures. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 211, 212, 213.

BI 362 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II, 4 credits (CIP 51.1199)
Covers cardiovascular function and cellular metabolism. Laboratory sections include identification of anatomical structures and analysis of physiological measures. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisite BI 361.

BI 363 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology III , 4 credits (CIP 51.1199)
Covers homeostatic regulation of body fluids, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Laboratory sections include identification of anatomical structures and analysis of physiological measures. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisite BI 362.

Modified Courses
BI 213 — Principles of Biology: Function and Ecology of Organisms – approved for University Studies (Explorations).
BI 231 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I – change lab to one hour of pre-lab and one 2-hour laboratory.
BI 232 — Human Anatomy and Physiology II – change lab to one hour of pre-lab and one 2-hour laboratory.
BI 233 — Human Anatomy and Physiology III – change lab to one hour of pre-lab and one 2-hour laboratory.
BI 340 — Introductory Ecology – change ES prerequisite option to ES 101, 102, 103. Cross-list with ES 340.
BI 383 — Science and Advocacy in Environmental Policy Debates – change to ES prefix and move to Environmental Studies.
BI 384 — Ethnobotany and Cross-Cultural Communication – change to ES prefix and move to Environmental Studies.
BI 385 — Women in Science – approved for University Studies (Integration).
BI 430/530 — Biological Illustration – approved for University Studies (Integration).
BI 444/544 — Vascular Plant Identification and Field Botany – minor description change.

Changes to major
Requirements for Major:

  • #3 omit "major field test in biology" from biology exit exam.
  • #4 decrease biology core credits to 36-38 credits; omit BI 343 from core requirements.
  • #5 Omit information about seeking biology degree without option area; include statement about completing requirements for one of the option areas. Bi 330, 380-389, 401-405, 409, 489, 490, 491, 492 cannot be used as upper division biology electives. Omit note about u.d. biology electives for biomedical science option.
  • Omit #6, #7, #8, #9
  • Capstone: omit specific reference to research; add option of internship.

Revised and new options
Biological Sciences Option:

  • requirements are the same as for the previous biology (without option) degree, and with the changes to the core listed above; require BI 343 (Developmental Biology).

Biomedical Science Option:

  • Biology: in #1, add BI 343 to requirements; add BI 361 or 414 as course choices. Complete 5 courses from approved u.d. biology course list.

Cell/Molecular Option:

  • In #1, require BI 343, and add BI 361 or 414 as course choices. In #2, complete 3 courses from list of approved biology courses.
  • Chemistry component (formerly in core) moved to cell/molecular requirements
  • Mathematics requirement (formerly in core) moved to cell/molecular requirements
  • Physical Science requirement (formerly in core) moved to cell/molecular requirements

Field Biology Option (new option):
Biology:

  • Requirements include (in addition to requirements for Core and Capstone)
  • BI 438
  • 1 course from BI 327, 318, 433, or 444
  • 1 course from BI 386, 388
  • 5 courses from a list of 19 courses

Chemistry: complete CH 201/204, 202/205, 203/206
Mathematics: complete MTH 112 (or SOU MTH 112 placement level), 243, 244
Physical Science: complete G 101, 102, 103 plus labs; or PH 201, 202, 203 plus labs
Geography: Complete ES 349, and 1 course from ES 451, 453, 457.

Omit Zoology option
Omit Botany option

Graduate Studies
Change MA/MS in Science to Master of Interdisciplinary Studies.


CHEMISTRY

Modified Courses
CH 202 — General Chemistry – for prereq of CH 201, complete with C- or better.
CH 203 — General Chemistry – for prereq of CH 202, complete with C- or better.
CH 205 — General Chemistry Laboratory – for prereq of CH 204, complete with C- or better.
CH 206 — General Chemistry Laboratory – for prereq of CH 205, complete with C- or better.
CH 300 — Forensic Investigation – change to 4 credits.
CH 314 — Chemical Research Communication I – add CH 332 as alternative prerequisite.
CH 331 — Principles of Organic Chemistry – delete CH 202 prereq, change prereq to complete with C- or better in CH 203, or instructor permission.
CH 332 — Principles of Organic Chemistry – for prereq of CH 331, complete with C- or better.
CH 334 — Organic Chemistry – Delete CH 202 prereq; change to C- or better in CH 203, or instructor permission.
CH 335 — Organic Chemistry – for prereq of CH 334, complete with C- or better.
CH 336 — Organic Chemistry – for prereq of CH 335, complete with C- or better.
CH 337 — Organic Chemistry – for prereq of CH 206, complete with C- or better or instructor permission.
CH 338 — Principles of Organic Chemistry – for prereq of CH 337, complete with C- or better.
CH 340 — Organic Spectroscopy – for prereq of CH 337, complete with C- or better.
CH 341 — Organic Chemistry Laboratory – for prereqs of CH 337 and 340, complete with C- or better.

Changes to degree
Omit BS in Environmental Studies with a Chemistry option.


COMMUNICATION

New Courses
CM 322 — Online Journalism: New Media Practice and Theory, 4 credits (CIP 09.0499)
Explores the role of the Internet in reshaping journalistic practices including, newsgathering, reporting, editing, visual journalism, and content design. Students will learn to use the Internet as a reporting tool, develop an understanding of the technological components of computer-assisted reporting and web design, and explore how multimediality or how different media formats can best tell a story. Prerequisites: DMF 201, JRN 251, 261.

CM 363 — Documentary Film and Photography: History and Theory, 4 credits (CIP 09.0499)
Introduces students to the history and theory of documentary cinema and social documentary still photography. We will review and analyze – through extensive readings and viewings – the evolution of the documentary film and photography genres as well as the varieties of approaches adopted in covering diverse political, economic, cultural, social, and historical subjects. Prerequisites: DMF 201, JRN 321, VP 115 or DMF 202, COMM 300.

DMF 202 — Digital Media Foundations II, 2 credits
Lectures focus on the development and applications of time based media, including digital video and audio production. DMF 202 serves as a prerequisite or recommended course for several upper division classes in art, applied multimedia, computer science, photojournalism, and video production. Corequisite: DMF 202L.

DMF 202L — Digital Media Foundations II Lab, 2 credits
Students complete a series of projects exploring techniques in digital video, audio production and digital storytelling. Co-requisite: DMF 202.

Suspended Courses
JRN 322 — Picture Editing, Layout, and Design
JRN 341 — Copyediting
VP 115 — Video Production Aesthetics
VP 363 — Contemporary Production Theory

Changes to major
Eliminate degree options in Journalism and Media Arts; replace with new degree option in Convergent Media.

Requirements for major:
In #6, add VP 410 to capstone experience options. In #7, increase journalism internship credits from 3 credits to 4 credits.

Journalism Option:

  • Former Journalism Option will be absorbed in new Convergent Media option.
  • News-Editorial emphasis: omit JRN 341; replace with CM 322 (Online Journalism: New Media Practice and Theory)
  • Photojournalism emphasis: in requirements, omit JRN 241, 322, and 323; add DMF 202/202L, CM 322, 363. Increase credits for JRN 377 to 2 credits; increase credits for JRN 409 and 410 to 4 credits each. In electives, omit JRN 341 and VP 115.

Media Arts option: Eliminate this option. Eliminate Film Studies emphasis. Move Video Production emphasis to new Convergent Media option.

Video Production emphasis: third emphasis in Convergent Media option.

  • Omit VP 115, 363 from requirements; replace with DMF 201/201L, 202/202L, and CM 363. For FLM 295, 296, 297, students choose two of these three courses.
  • In electives, omit DMF 201, JRN 241.

Changes to minors
Film Studies minor: in electives, omit VP 363 and replace with CM 363; update PS 260 to PS 360.
Journalism minor: in electives, omit JRN 241, 341.
Video production minor: replace VP 115 with DMF 201/201L, 202/202L.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

New Courses
CS 415/515 — Foundations of Emerging Computer Applications, 4 credits (CIP 11.0101)
Covers the background needed for students to make contributions in an emerging application area. Topics may include digital signal processing, data mining, and security. Focuses specifically on those foundational concepts that students need in order to be able to create or enhance digital solutions. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisites: CS 257, MTH 112 or an appropriate SOU placement level, and MTH 243. Some topics may require additional prerequisites.

Course removed from suspension
CS 458/558 — Security III (4 credits)
Studies the threats to computer systems connected to the Internet. Examines how crackers find a system and its vulnerabilities, then use those vulnerabilities to compromise the system, including the use of viruses. Looks at various tools used to attack and defend systems as well as resources to detect and analyze intrusions. Addresses both wired and wireless systems security. Prerequisite: CS 457.


CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

New Courses
CCJ 298 — Orientation to Criminology and Criminal Justice Online Courses, 1 credit (CIP 43.0104)
Promotes and surveys student online readiness. Introduces students to all aspects of online learning, including SOU's online teaching platform (Blackboard), online research strategies, online class etiquette, threaded discussion, submitting assignments online, peer review, and how to create and maintain a supportive online learning community. Introduces criminology and criminal justice faculty and their expectations of online students; introduces administrative and support staff and their role in promoting online student success. Describes major requirements, capstone and internship requirements, major advising and scheduling. Graded P/NP.

CCJ 309 — Research Methods in Criminology/Criminal Justice, 4 credits (CIP 43.0104)
Examines social science research methods including survey research, methods of evaluation research, sampling, and contrasts quantitative and qualitative research. Prerequisites: CCJ 230, or 231.

CCJ 406 — CCJ Teaching Assistant, 1-8 credits (CIP 43.0104)
Explores the process of teaching by working closely with an instructor. May involve any aspect of teaching including research, content presentation, tutoring, paper–grading, and grade-recording. Prerequisite: instructor consent. Graded P/NP or A-F.

Modified Courses
CCJ 351 — Criminal Law – renumber CCJ 411/511; add CCJ 300 prerequisite.
CCJ 409A — Capstone Research – only offered for a letter grade (not P/NP).
CCJ 412 — Law of Criminal Evidence – create CCJ 512 component (CCJ 412/512); add CCJ 300 prerequisite.
CCJ 413 — Law of Criminal Procedures – create CCJ 513 component (CCJ 413/513); add CCJ 300 prerequisite.
CCJ 461 — Terrorism – create CCJ 561 component (CCJ 461/561); add CCJ 300 prerequisite.

Changes to Major

  • Requirements for the major: in #3, increase to 68 credits, 60 of which must be CCJ.
  • add #4 requirement – students in online degree completion program or registered in online CCJ courses must complete CCJ 298. Ashland campus based students may take CCJ 298 as an elective to support online work.
  • Required Courses for CCJ majors: upper division changes to 40-41 credits; add CCJ 298, renumber CCJ 351 to CCJ 411. In electives, add PS 435 (Administrative Law) to choices.
  • BA/BS in CCJ with Emphasis in Forensics – upper division changes to 40-41 credits; add CCJ 298; renumber CCJ 351 to CCJ 411.

Changes to Minor

  • Increase upper division credits to 16-17 credits; add CCJ 298; renumber CCJ 351 to CCJ 411.

ECONOMICS

New Courses
EC 345 — Healthcare Economics, 4 credits (CIP 45.0602)
This course uses economic tools to understand and evaluate how healthcare is financed and delivered, and then poses complex policy questions for consideration. The first half of the course is devoted to exploring the determinants of demand for healthcare services, including the important role of health insurance, and then the determinants of supply of healthcare services. In the second half of the course attention shifts to the role of government, in financing and provision of healthcare. This leads to policy explorations and options, including a review of healthcare systems in other countries. Prerequisite: EC 201.

Changes to major
In Applied Economics and Public Policy Option, add EC 345 as elective.


ENGINEERING

New Course
ENGR 306 — Sustainability: Materials Technology and Design, 3 credits (CIP 14.1201)
Introduction to basic properties of building materials (e.g., strength, heat transport), concepts of design (e.g., day-lighting, passive solar) and technologies (e.g., photovoltaics, LED lighting). Critical analysis of life cycle, performance characteristics, environmental impact and sustainability of conventional and new approaches. Prerequisites: upper division standing and completion of all lower division University Studies requirements. Cross-listed with PH 306. Approved for University Studies (Integration).


ENGLISH AND WRITING

New Courses
WR 225 — University Seminar for Transfers: "Worlds and Writing" [formerly USEM 225]

WR 230 — Introduction to Rhetoric, 4 credits (CIP 36.0118)
Focuses on the ways in which Classical rhetorical theories have relevance for contemporary students and contemporary issues and problems. Emphasis will be placed on theories of knowledge and identity, how these theories contribute to understanding communication, and the ethics of rhetorical theory. Prerequisites: University Seminar or the equivalent.

WR 401 — Capstone II, 2 credits (CIP 36.0118)
Senior project for Creative Writing and Professional Writing students. English Education and Special Studies students may also choose this emphasis. Each individually-designed project integrates knowledge and skills in the discipline. Prerequisite: WR 400.

WR 455/555 — The History of Publishing: From Alphabet to E-book, 4 credits (CIP 23.1101)
Explores the history of the book in the West from the invention of writing to electronic publication. Topics considered include authorship, publication, manufacture, distribution, reception, competition, and the survival of books. Introduces students to various writing professions through visits from professional writers. Recommended course: ENG 300.

WR 460/560 — Advanced Topics in Creative Nonfiction, 4 credits (CIP 36.0118)
Designed for advanced students who are serious about pursuing the nonfiction essay genre, with an eye towards publication or to round out a portfolio of sample work for employment. Prerequisites: Portfolio and WR 350. (See main office for portfolio expectations.)

Modified Courses
ENG 201, 202 — Shakespeare – cross-list as TA 201, 202.
ENG 400 — Capstone – rename Capstone I; modify description to specify preparation of bibliography and written portion of project; add senior standing to prerequisites.
ENG 401/501 — Research – delete ENG 501 component; rename Capstone II. Change credits to 2 credits; add course description (nearly same as old ENG 400 description. Prerequisite: ENG 400.
ENG 403/503 — Thesis – delete 403 component.
ENG 409/509 — Practicum – add footnote "A combined maximum of 8 credit hours of ENG 405, 407, 509 may be applied to the major."
ENG 410 — Community Engagement Writing: Internships and Practica – approved for Integration.
ENG 447 — Major Forces in Literature – some topics approved for University Studies (Integration).
ENG 455 — Topics in World Literature – some topics fulfill University Studies requirements.
WR 400 — Capstone – rename Capstone I; modify description to specify preparation of bibliography and written portion of project; add senior standing to prerequisites.
WR 403/503 — Thesis – delete WR 403 component.
WR 405/505 — Writing and Conference – add footnote "A combined maximum of 8 credits of 405, 407, 409 may be applied to the major."
WR 407/507 — Writing Seminar – add footnote "A combined maximum of 8 credits of 405, 407, 409 may be applied to the major."
WR 409/509 — Practicum - add footnote "A combined maximum of 8 credits of 405, 407, 409 may be applied to the major."
WR 410 — Community Engagement Writing: Internships and Practica – approved for Integration.

Note: on page 87M, remove footnote ENG 501, 505, and 507 are limited to 9 credits singly or in combination. The footnote is misplaced.

Deleted Courses
ENG 403 — Thesis (retain ENG 503)
WR 403 — Thesis (retain WR 503)
WR 450/550 — The Business of Writing

Changes to major
Creative Writing option: omit 4 credits of 200- or 300-level grammar course; update u.d. writing or literature course to humanities (from arts and letters). Add 2 credits Internship, and increase Capstone credits to 4 credits by adding WR 401.

English Education option: decrease to 36 credits; omit ENG 487 (TESL); change Poetry Studies to Genre Studies (Poetry, Novel, Short Story, Essay, Drama); add TESL to 400-level literature, Linguistics and/or writing courses; increase capstone credits to 4 credits by adding WR 401 or ENG 400, 401. Omit footnote for WR 472.

Literary Studies option: increase credits to 40 credits. Omit ENG 371/372 and 381/382, and 400-level literature courses. Increase capstone credits to 4 credits with addition of ENG 401 (WR 400/401 are not options). Replace 8 elective credits with 28 credits of u.d. electives in ENG or WR (12 credits must be 400-level literature courses; 4 credits may be in writing.)

Professional Writing option: decrease to 36 credits; omit WR 450; increase capstone credits to 4 credits with the addition of WR 401.

Special Studies in English and Writing option: decrease to 36 credits; decrease u.d. courses to 32 credits; increase capstone credits to 4 credits with addition of ENG 401, or WR 400/401.

Changes to minor
Creative Writing minor: replace WR 450 with new WR 455.

Writing and Professional Applications – rename Professional Writing. Revise requirements to specify 12 credits of WR 327, 329, 493; 4 credits selected from WR 410 or 409; 8 credits selected from WR 350, 414, 455, 312, 472, and ENG 492.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (including ES, G, and GEOG programs)

New Courses
ES 101 — Introduction to Environmental Studies: Earth Science, 4 credits (CIP 40.0601)
This interdisciplinary science course provides students with a basic understanding of the Earth's atmosphere, geosphere, and hydrosphere. Topics include minerals, rocks, atmospheric and oceanic composition, and the structure of the Earth's interior. Provides a framework for student's interested in the major processes operating on the Earth's surface and in its interior. Intended for environmental studies students, but also open to students pursuing general education requirements. Approved for University Studies (Explorations).

ES 102 — Introduction to Environmental Studies: Biological Science, 4 credits (CIP 03.0103)
Studies the interactions of organisms with their environments and each other at the levels of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems, and how organisms and their interactions are shaped by evolution. Introduces biodiversity, species conservation, and ecosystem services. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hr laboratory. Approved for University Studies (Explorations).

ES 103 — Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science, 4 credits (CIP 03.0103)
Studies how people perceive and interact with their bio-physical environment. Develops key concepts and analytic tools from anthropology, economics, geography, political science and sociology. Applies these social scientific perspectives to contemporary environmental issues, like global climate change and forest health in the Pacific Northwest. Develops literacy in the social sciences, and prepares students to make thoughtful choices about how to live, work and play in their environment. Four hours of lecture and discussion. Approved for University Studies (Explorations).

ES 310 — Environmental Applications, 2 credits (CIP 03.0104)
Offers an interdisciplinary study of a current topic in environmental application such as energy, water resources, land use or endangered species. Explores the integration of natural and social sciences in examining, debating, and solving specific environmental problems faced by society. Fosters critical analysis of complex issues by stimulating discussion and debate and raising awareness. Prerequisite: ES 210.

ES 327 — Energy and Climate Change, 4 credits (CIP 40.0601)
This course explores the interconnections among natural resources, energy, and global climate change. Topics include the extraction and origins of fossils fuels, carbon dioxide emissions, long-term and short term climate variability, and alternative energy resources such as geothermal, hydroelectric, nuclear, solar, tidal, wave, and wind. Intended for environmental studies students, but also open to other university students interested in issues of energy and climate change. Two 50 minute lectures and one 2-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: ES101, ES112, or G102.

ES 351 — Environmental Policy and Impact Analysis, 4 credits (CIP 03.0201)
Addresses environmental law, policy and environmental impact analysis. Methods by which society appraises the likely effects of a proposed action on the environment, alternatives to the proposal, and appropriate measures to be adopted to protect culture and natural systems are investigated. The course addresses the preparation of Environmental Assessments (EAs) and Environmental Impacts Statements (EIS) under the guidelines of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Federal environmental laws and international protocols are reviewed in the context of air, water, energy, toxic substances, waste management, and genetically engineered organisms. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

ES 379 — Biodiversity, 4 credits (CIP 26.1307)
An interdisciplinary study integrating theory, methods and applications in modern biodiversity sciences, covering the origins of biodiversity, ecological and biogeographic distributions of diversity, major adaptive radiations, episodes of mass extinctions, with a focus on the problem of modern extinctions. Includes descriptions of biodiversity within geneological and ecological hierarchies, phylogenetic theory and lineage analysis, a broad overview describing the results of modern systematics research and bioinformatics. Applications of biodiversity sciences in biological inventory, monitoring, and global biodiversity assessment are explored through case studies and practical examples drawn from recent literature. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent. Approved for University Studies (Integration).

ES 383 — Science and Advocacy in Environmental Policy Debates, 3 credits [formerly BI 383]
Explores the interactions of science and advocacy in the development of environmental policy. Investigates controversial environmental problems where science and advocacy are confounded and where the common good and special interests are difficult to discern. Students engage in dialogue based on analysis of case studies, including issues related to forest health, use of pesticides, resource development, global warming, and loss of biodiversity. Two 75-minute meetings. Approved for University Studies (Synthesis). Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division University Studies requirements.

ES 384 — Ethnobotany and Cross-Cultural Communication, 3 credits [formerly BI 384]
Explores cultural diversity in the human relationship with plants and the role of plants in diverse world views. Applications of medicinal and ceremonial plants in Native American, Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and other practices serve as a vehicle for interpreting how different cultures understand the human place in the cosmos. Examines the interaction of divergent world views through experiential cross-cultural communication against the backdrop of a pluralist philosophical framework and modern sciences. Two 75-minute meetings. Approved for University Studies (Synthesis). Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division University Studies requirements.

ES 421 — Ecological Economics and Sustainable Development, 4 credits (CIP 03.0204)
Addresses the topic of sustainable development focusing on economics at the interface of states, nations and the global economy. Students will complete a comprehensive study of the emerging field of ecological economics and contrast/compare to the neoclassical economic model of development. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis of a developing region, state and/or nation in terms of economic development based on population, agriculture, industrial development, and natural capital (ecosystem goods and services). Students will be required to propose policy options for sustainable development within a region, state and/or nation and provide a means by which development will move towards global sustainability. Prerequisites: ES 103 and ES 210 or EC 201.

ES 423 — Sustainability and Natural Resources, 4 credits (CIP 03.0201)
Critically examines sustainability as it has been defined and debated globally and locally, applying the concept to natural resources (e.g., forests and water), places (e.g., universities and communities), and decisions (e.g., governance and markets). Considers the interrelatedness of ecological, social and economic systems and various efforts to balance their needs through interdisciplinary research, public policies, market mechanisms, global initiatives and grassroots activism. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and ES 111-113 or instructor permission.

ES 435 — Water Resources, 4 credits (CIP 03.0104)
Explores the historical context of simple-to-complex water resource issues; the natural processes of water by focusing on the hydrosphere; what constitutes water quality – from the scale of ecosystems to human health; the impact of water project construction and management; the roles that water agencies play in water resource management, the environmental impact issues of water quality, water quantity, and water resource management issues; and issues in water conflict resolution. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103, 210.

ES 442 — Valuation of Ecosystem Goods and Services, 4 credits (CIP 03.0204)
Addresses the topic of valuation of goods and services provided by ecosystems that are critical to society. Students will complete a comprehensive review of economic non-market valuation techniques applied to assess the value of natural systems not often captured in markets. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis considering market and non-market values of an environmental resource and propose policy options for a decision on the optimal use of the natural resource. Prerequisites: ES 103 and ES 210 or EC 201.

ES 445 — Ecosystem Management and Conservation, 4 credits (CIP 03.0201)
Reviews and analyzes attempts by society to manage ecosystems and/or conserve biological diversity at varied levels of biological organization including populations of species, communities and ecosystems. Analysis focuses on the societal efforts to maintain dynamic ecological structure and functions relevant to the conservation of valuable ecosystems and biota. Discussions and field investigations will focus on important areas of conservation biology and ecosystem management research such as invasive species control, acid precipitation and amphibian decline, climate change, ecological economics, wetland mitigation and restoration, endangered/threatened species conservation, and forested watershed management. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103 and ES 210.

ES 475 — Environmental Modeling, 4 credits (CIP 03.0104)
Teaches environmental simulation modeling and the application of computer model results to real world problems in environmental studies. Computer-driven data analysis and modeling have become critical to the understanding and resolution of environmental problems and issues of sustainability and natural resource management. This course teaches computer simulation modeling skills and environmental system dynamics through an applied approach requiring the conceptualization, construction and creation of dynamic computer simulation models to aid in the resolution of environmental problems. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103 and ES 210.

ES 479/579 — Biosphere, Ecology and Global Environmental Change, 4 credits (CIP 26.1301)
An integrative study of biospheric systems ecology, examining global ecosystem structure and function, exploring how global systems change in response to natural and human-generated perturbations. A major objective of the course is to gain experience reading current scientific literature that reports research on ecology of the biosphere and issues of global concern for humanity. Specific topics involving global systems change will range across current and near-future change, including change in global temperature and climate patterns, change in sea level, change in atmospheric composition, change in atmosphere and ocean circulations, change in oxic states of the oceans, change in freshwater systems and desertification of continental interiors, change in the cryosphere (e.g. melting of polar ice), change in the lithosphere (e.g. catastrophic release of methane clathrates and volcanogenic gases), and asteroid impact scenarios. Diverse topics in the course are unified by examining how scientific research informs policy pertaining to changes in our planetary environment. Prerequisites: ES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

ES 480 — Fire Ecology, 4 credits (CIP 26.1301)
Studies the effects of fire, both natural and anthropogenic, on ecological, social, and economic systems. Examines the effects of human intervention in natural fire cycles and the use of fire as a tool in conservation and resource management. Focuses primarily on forested ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest, but includes a global overview of fire and current research into probable effects of global climate change on fire regimes. Prerequisite: BI 340.

G 318 — Crystals and Minerals, 3 credits CIP 40.0601)
Examines the principles of formation and identification of crystals of different compositions, structures, and physical properties. Characterization and identification of common rock-forming minerals as well as those that are economically important. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: G 103; CH 201 (and CH 204) or CH 100 or concurrent enrollment in either course; MTH 111 or concurrent enrollment.

G 319 — Lithology and Geology of Southern Oregon, 3 credits (CIP 40.0601)
Covers classification, description, identification, and genesis of common igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Places many of those rocks in the geologic setting of Southern Oregon. Field trips are required. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: G 318; CH 202 (and CH 205) or CH 101 or concurrent enrollment in either course; MTH 111 or concurrent enrollment.

G 431 — Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology, 4 credits, (CIP 40.0601)
Examines igneous and metamorphic rocks using geochemical analysis, hand specimen identification, and the petrographic (polarizing) microscope. Such data is used to describe chemical and rock fabric relationships and infer petrologic genesis. Field trips required. Two lectures and two 3-hour laboratories. Prerequisite: G319. CH 203 (and CH 206) recommended.

Newly cross-listed courses
ES 209 — Introduction to Meteorology, 4 credits (cross-listed with GEOG 209)
Offers an introductory study of meteorology, providing a qualitative and quantitative examination of the global energy budget, weather elements, instrumentation, fronts, air masses, cyclones and anticyclones, severe weather, pollution, ozone layer depletion, acid rain, and global warming. Students gain an understanding of weather analysis and forecasting using current computer technology. Prerequisites: ES 111 and computer skills. Cross-listed with GEOG 209.

ES 340 — Introductory Ecology, 4 credits (cross-listed with BI 340.)
Covers the interactions of organisms with their environments and each other, as well as population dynamics, biological communities, and ecosystem functions. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 211, 212, 213, or ES 101, 102, 103. Corequisite: ES 340L. (Cross-listed with BI 340.)

ES 420 — Environmental Sociology, 4 credits (cross-listed with SOC 420)
Examines the relationship between the human social institutions we create and the biophysical environments in which we live. Topics may include the culture of nature, population and consumption, political economy of environmental problems, social construction of environmental problems, evolution of environmental activism, public attitudes toward the environment, collaborative and community-based resource management, and environmental problem solving. Prerequisites: SOC 204 and one other sociology course or instructor consent. Cross-listed with SOC 420.

ES 437/537 — Conservation in the United States, 4 credits (cross-listed with GEOG 437/537)
Explores the evolution of Western environmental perceptions from classical times to present. Emphasizes environmental movements in the U.S., the forces behind environmental crisis, and the responses of society and its institutions. Prerequisites: ES 111, 112, or 210; upper division or graduate standing. (Cross-listed with GEOG/SSPC 437/537.)

ES 439/539 — Land Use Planning (cross-listed with GEOG/SSPC 439/539)
Applies land use planning history and legal foundations as the framework for exploring problems in land use planning, development, and public policy formulation. Pays particular attention to Oregon's land use planning legislation and its regional implementations. GEOG 350 recommended. Approved for University Studies (Integration). Prererequisites: GEOG 107, 108, or ES 210 and upper division or graduate standing. (Cross-listed with GEOG/SSPC 439/539.)

ES 481/581 — Geomorphology, 4 credits (cross-listed with GEOG/G 481/581)
Provides a systematic and quantitative study of terrestrial processes, with an emphasis on the evolution and interpretation of landforms. Topics include the history of geomorphology and an assessment of the processes associated with mass wasting, rivers, glaciers, deserts, and shorelines. Students should be familiar with basic logarithms, trigonometry, and topographic-map-reading skills. Prerequisites: G 102 or ES 111, 112; completion of the University Studies (Quantitative Reasoning) requirement; and upper division or graduate standing. Approved for University Studies (Integration). (Cross-listed with GEOG/G 481/581).

ES 482/582 — Climatology, 4 credits (cross-listed with GEOG 482/582)
Investigates the physical mechanisms that control the spatial aspects of global and regional climates. Develops a qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the Earth's atmosphere system through an understanding of spatial variations in heat, moisture, and the motion of the atmosphere. Applies these concepts to a wide range of issues in climate, human activities, and the environment. Discusses human consequences, including natural vegetation assemblages, agriculture and fisheries, health and comfort, building and landscape design, industrial influences, and issues of climate change. Approved for University Studies (Integration). Prerequisites: ES/GEOG 111 or ES/GEOG 209; completion of the University Studies (Quantitative Reasoning) requirement; and upper division or graduate standing. Cross-listed as GEOG 482/582.

ES 492/592 Field Geography, 4 credits (cross-listed with GEOG 492/592)
Applies geographic survey methods and techniques to the evaluation of selected study areas. Students complete projects, including cartographic, written, and oral presentations of findings. Typically taken during spring term of the senior year. Students who are not seniors must obtain instructor consent. (cross-listed with GEOG 492/592)

ES 498/598 — Internship, 2 to 6 credits (cross-listed with former GEOG 496/596)
Provides on-site experience at an educational, governmental, nongovernmental, or industrial organization for a minimum of ten hours a week Students apply methods and techniques to problems such as land use planning, resource management, cartography, business, and industry. Prerequisite: completion of 24 credits of upper division coursework. Cross-listed with GEOG/SSPC 498/598.

GEOG 111 — Physical Environment I, 4 credits (cross-listed with ES 111)
Explores and analyzes the environment, bringing together the many physical factors that create a complete understanding of Earth system operations. Includes basic concepts and relationships between and among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere with emphasis on the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Familiarizes students with human-environment interactions that are relevant to our lives. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Corequisite: GEOG 111L. Approved for University Studies (Explorations). Cross-listed with ES 111.

GEOG 112 — Physical Environment II, 4 credits (cross-listed with ES 112)
Explores and analyzes the environment, bringing together the many physical factors that create a complete understanding of Earth system operations. Includes basic concepts and relationships between and among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere with emphasis on the geosphere and biosphere. Familiarizes students with human-environment interactions that are relevant to our lives. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Corequisite: GEOG 112L. Approved for University Studies (Explorations). Cross-listed with ES 112.

Modified Courses
ES 401 — Research – add ES 501 component.
G 314 — Hydrogeology I – rename Hydrology; change prerequisites to G 101 or ES 101 or ES 112, and Quantitative Reasoning requirement.
G 315 — Hydrogeology II – rename Hydrogeology; omit co-requisite of MTH 251.
G 330 — Metals and Civilization – approved for University Studies (Integration).
G 433/533 — Soil Science – add cross-listing as ES 433/533.
GEOG 209 — Introduction to Meteorology – add cross-listing as ES 209.
GEOG 433/533 — Soil Science – add cross-listing with ES 433/533.
GEOG 437/537 — Conservation in the United States – add cross-listing with ES 437/537.
GEOG 439/539 — Land Use Planning – add cross-listing with ES 439/539.
GEOG 440 — Planning Issues – add cross-listing with ES 440.
GEOG 481/581 — Geomorphology – add cross-listing as ES 481/581.
GEOG 482/582 — Climatology – cross-list as ES 482/582.
GEOG 492/592 — Field Geography Capstone III – rename Field Geography; modify description to omit reference to weekend field trip and geography major; omit prerequisites of GEOG 490, 491. Cross-list as ES 492/592.
GEOG 496/596 — Geographic Internship – renumber GEOG 498/598 and rename Internship; modify description to omit reference to geography, and credit options on description. Prerequisite: completion of 24 credits of upper division coursework. Cross-list as ES/SSPC 498/598.
G 481/581 — Geomorphology – add cross-listing as ES 481/581.
Suspended courses
G 310 — Advanced General Geology
G 312 — Mineralogy
G 313 — Lithology
G 316 — Hydrogeology III
G 426 — Optical/Igneous Petrology and Petrography
G 427 — Igneous/Metamorphic Petrology and Petrography
G 428 — Sedimentary Petrology and Petrography
G 430/530 — Low-Temperature Geochemistry

Deleted Courses
ES 209 — Practicum
GEOG 300 — Geographic Research Methods
GEOG 490 — Field Geography Capstone I
GEOG 491 — Field Geography Capstone II

Changes to Major
Environmental Studies Major:
Revise and reorganize major; omit previous options of Biology, Geography, Geology, and Social Science and Policy Track. Replace with concentrations in Cultural Resource Management, Earth Science, Ecology and Conservation, Land Use Planning, and Sustainability and Policy.

Revised requirements:
ES Core: 58-63 credits (includes 16 credits from ES 101, 102, 103, 210; 14 credits upper division required; 8 credits from u.d. natural science, 8 credits u.d. social science, 8 credits math, and 4-9 credits capstone.)

Cultural Resource Management Concentration: 44 credits (includes 16 credits Cultural Resource Mgmt Core; 12 credits u.d. natural science, 12 credits u.d. social science, and 4 credits internship/practicum.)

Earth Science Concentration: 46-52 credits (includes 20-24 credits l.d. requirements of G 103, plus either sequence in chemistry, biology, or physics; 16 credits of earth science concentration, 6-8 credits u.d. geology, and 4 credits u.d. natural science)

Ecology and Conservation Concentration: 41-44 credits (includes 28 credits CH, ES, GEOG/G courses, plus 13-16 credits u.d. electives.)

Land Use Planning Concentration: 42 credits (includes 24 credits core, 8 credits u.d. social science, 8 credits u.d. natural science, and 2 credits internship/practicum.)

Sustainability and Policy Concentration: 40 credits (includes 24 credits core, 12 credits from either environmental policy, green business, or sustainable communities courses, and 4 credits internship/practicum.)

Changes to minors
Geography minor: increase to 28 credits; require GEOG 101, 107, and ES/GEOG/G 111 or 112; select 4 credits from regional geography, and 8 credits from u.d. electives.

Land Use Planning minor: choose 8 credits lower division from ES 101, 102, 111, 112; select 4 credits from GEOG 101, 107, 108; require 20 credits u.d. by requiring ES/GEOG/G 451.

New Minor
Environmental Studies (28 credits) includes 12 credits lower division , 8 credits u.d. natural science, and 8 credits u.d. social science.


FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

New Courses
JPN 301, 302, 303 — Japanese Culture, Composition and Conversation, 4 credits each (CIP 16.0302)
A study of Japanese language and culture, expanding on the intermediate level language program. The course is taught in Japanese. The course focuses on developing oral and written communication skills through a study of Japanese culture and society. Students communicate in Japanese on topics ranging from everyday life, family and social questions affecting cultures. Materials include cultural and literary texts, films, animation, realia, and audio materials. Continues work with up to 600 Japanese characters. Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Prerequisites: JPN 203 or equivalent.

Modified Courses
SPAN 201, 202, 203 Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture I, II, III – prerequisite for SPAN 201 is SOU Spanish Placement Level 4 or SPAN 103.

Suspended Courses
SPAN 111, 112 — Beginning Spanish Review

Changes to Major
French

  • Language and Culture Core: FR 315 must be taken on SOU campus in Ashland.
  • Advanced Culture Electives – FR 350/450 and 428 requirements are 0-8 credits; approved non-departmental courses taken for the advanced culture electives cannot be used to fulfill the Advanced Language and Culture course requirement.

Master of Arts in Spanish Language Teaching – omit statement about 9 credits of approved coursework from another institution.
Other: self-instructional programs available for courses in languages such as Chinese, Arabic, or Native American languages (working directly with tribal linguists.)

International Internship – Students of French who are unable to complete the international internship requirement may complete a local work experience and additional coursework with departmental approval.

Changes to Minors
French – omit FR 301, 311, 312, 407 from electives list.
German – add note that to complete the minor in German, some credits must be taken through Study Abroad, approved online courses, or Deutsche Sommerschule am Pazifik.


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

New Courses
HE 253 — Chinese Medicine: Five Elements, 2 credits (CIP 31.0501)
An introduction of Five Phase Symbology (Five Element Theory) from Traditional Oriental Medicine. Application of the principles of Five Phase zymology in diagnosis of disease, treatment modality choices (acupuncture, herbal prescription, massage) and self-care choices including diet therapy, exercise, and lifestyle modifications.

HE 254 — Chinese Medicine: Introduction to Herbs, 2 credits (CIP 31.0501)
An introductory course covering the theory of herbal polypharmacy prescriptions; classification of individual herbs; classic formulas and their individual herbs will be learned by rote; toxic herbs and their safe preparation discussed. Students will be familiar with standard Chinese formulas and their uses.

PE 195 — Holistic Fitness, I, II, III, 2 credits each (CIP 31.0501)
This course incorporates physical exercises for the body and energy exercises for the mind in order to create a peaceful, productive, and creative brain. Students will learn the basic principles of Brain Respiration which teaches how to effectively release physical blockages, emotional stress and negative, limiting thoughts. Prerequisites: Level I for level II, and level II for level III.

PE 197 — T'ai Chi Chuan, 2 credits (maximum 6 credits)(CIP 31.0501)
Tai Chi Chuan is an ancient Chinese system of self-defense primarily practiced today for its benefits in terms of exercise, flexibility, and inner calm. This class focuses on a dance-like series of slow movements which build balance, strength, and coordination.

PE 198 — Meditation I, 2 credits (CIP 31.0501)
Introduces students to meditation techniques. Meditation is used around the world to promote spiritual growth and assist with mental clarity. The course format is designed to benefit the student both physically and mentally. Basic yoga postures and energizing techniques will be taught to help the student develop their own daily practice routine.

PE 236 — Advanced Scuba, 2 credits (CIP 31.0101)
Refines basic diving skills, introduces rescue techniques, such as self-rescue, diver stress, emergency management and search and recovery, and promotes diving as a safe and fulfilling lifetime activity. Prerequisite: PE 234.

Modified Courses
HE 250 — Health and Society I – modify description to omit sample topics.
HE 331 — Environmental Health – approved for University Studies (Integration).
HE 362 — Community Health – modify description to omit suggested topic; approved for University Studies (Integration).
HE 443 — Senior Capstone – oral presentation of scholarly paper is required; change HE 209 prerequisite to HE 309.
HE 444/544 — Sexuality Education – focuses on preparation of future teachers; approved for University Studies (Integration).
HE 453/553 — Drugs in Society – focuses on affects on society and individuals; approved for University Studies (Integration).
PE 443 — Senior Capstone – oral presentation of scholarly paper is required.

Changes to major
In Required Courses (Health and Physical Education): List HE 309 as HE/PE 309; list HE 409 as HE/PE 409.

OAL concentration:

  • In lower-division courses, change PE 294 to PE 394.
  • In upper-division courses, update credits from 34 to 37 credits; Practicum in Outdoor Adventure Leadership adds PE 309 to requirement.

HISTORY

New Courses
HST 300 — Research and Writing, 4 credits
Addresses the methodologies of research and writing for History and Political Science. Students will develop their research skills, using both primary and secondary sources; acquire facility with basic techniques of data analysis and the use and interpretation of descriptive statistics; and learn how to structure written assignments appropriate to the production of university-quality historical and political analysis. Required of all History and Political Science majors. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. (Cross-listed with PS 300.)

Modified Courses
HST 250, 251 — American History and Life – modify description for HST 251.
HST 382 — Vietnam War and Film – approved for University Studies (Integration).
HST 421/521 — Environmental History – approved for University Studies (Integration).
HST 451, 452, 453 American Foreign Relations – rename United States Foreign Relations; modify description. Prerequisite: upper division standing.
HST 454 — U.S.-Latin American Relations – modify description; change prerequisite to upper division standing.
HST 457 — Antebellum America – rename Jefferson to Civil War.
HST 458 — Civil War and Reconstruction – minor description correction.
HST 459 — Rise of Industrial America – rename U.S. History, 1877-1929. Modify description.
HST 476 — American West – minor description change.
HST 481, 482 — Twentieth-Century United States – move some topics previously in HST 482 to HST 481.

Note: remove all "recommended" courses from descriptions for HST 305/306, 344, 350/351/352, 361/362,/363, 372, 395, 396, 397, 448, 450, 451/452/453, 454, 459, 465, 472, 476, 481/482.

Courses brought back from suspension
HST 315 — Ancient Greece, 4 credits
Examines ancient Greece from the Minoans and Mycenaeans through the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Among the topics are Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations, the so-called "Dark Ages," Archaic Greece, the emergence of the poleis, the Persian Wars, the rise of Athens, the Peloponnesian War, and Alexander the Great. Economic, social, political, cultural, and intellectual developments will be featured. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.

HST 316 — Ancient Rome, 4 credits
Surveys the political, military, economic, social, cultural and religious institutions of Ancient from the beginning of the Republic (fifth century B.C.E.) to the fall of the Empire (fifth century C.E.). The focus will be on the period from the rise of Julius Caesar during the first century B.C.E., through the reign of Augustus (27 BC to AD 14), and to the period of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (AD 161-180). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.

HST 464 — Colonial Mexico, 4 credits
Explores Mexico from the pre-Columbian era through independence from Spain in 1821. Emphasis will be on the continuity of indigenous lifeways, the emergence of a new mestizo culture based on contributions from the Indian, European, and African elements of Mexican society, the partnership between Church and state, exports, labor, and the rise of incipient nationalism at then end of the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.

Changes to major
Requirements for the Major: in #2, require HST 300 and add 4credits to major; in #3, make changes to these categories:

  • European History – add HST 315, 316 to course choices
  • Asian or Latin American History – add HST 464 to course choices.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Modified Course
IS 350 — World Politics – remove cross-listing with PS 350.

Suspended Course
IS 398 — Research Methods

Changes to major
International Political Economy emphasis: update course title for ANTH 451.


MATHEMATICS

Modified Courses
MTH 105 — Contemporary Mathematics – revise description.
MTH 431/531 — Topics in Analysis – delete topics of Integration, and Infinite Series.
MTH 481/581 — Topics in Middle School and High School Mathematics – add new topic "Measurement" with prereqs MTH 213 or 251.

Changes to Major
Curriculum for Nonmajors

  • Recommend MTH 243 and 244 for solid statistics core
  • Recommend MTH 290 for liberal arts majors and physical science majors, and for breadth

Enrichment courses - delete this section from catalog.
Capstone Experience - revise section to reflect retrenchment drop to one quarter.
Mathematics Honors Program – students petition the Mathematics Department (not Honors Committee).


MILITARY SCIENCE

New Course
MS 191 — Leadership Laboratory, 1 credit
Designed to use basic military training to develop confidence, character, and leadership in students. Lab instruction uses a team approach in all events. Students learn various military tasks such as marching, marksmanship, tactical patrolling, rappelling, and urban assault techniques. Students gain practical knowledge in first aid, water survival and land navigation. Most classes are conducted in an outdoor setting. Open enrollment.

Modified Courses
MS 111 — Adventure Training I – add land navigation and map reading to topics.

Deleted Courses
MS 295 — OCS Phase I
MS 395 — OCS Phase III

Changes to minor

  • Program will deliver US Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) curriculum; completion of course will lead to commission as second lieutenant as reserve officer in U.S. army.
  • Educational benefits changed, and include scholarships, GI Bill, federal tuition assistance, and text book stipend.
  • Commissioning: cadets completing requirements for baccalaureate degree are eligible to receive a commission as second lieutenant as a reserve officer in U.S. army.
  • Program changes: remove MS 295, 395, and 419 from requirements.

MUSIC

New Courses
MUS 356 — Audio Recording, 3 credits (CIP 50.0909)
A survey of basic audio recording techniques and practices including: basic audio theory and terminology, signal flow, patchbays, analog vs. digital recording, multi-track and stereo recording, overdubbing, microphones, editing, mixing, MIDI, and inter-program options. The course is a useful introduction for those planning to pursue the field professionally, a valuable "behind-the-scenes" tutorial for those planning to pursue those aspects of the music or post-production industry, and a basic "how-to" course for those who simply wish to do home recording or other informal production. Prerequisites: MUS 355. Recommended: MUS100 or ability to read music.

MUS 444/544 — Jazz Theory, 3 credits (CIP 50.0901)
Introduction to jazz harmony: chord symbols, chord voicing practices, analysis, reharmonization practices, scale choices for improvisation, creation of bass lines. May not be offered every academic year. Prerequisites: MUS 223, 226, and completion of piano proficiencies.

MUS 550 — Research and Chamber Recital, 3 credits (CIP 50.0901)
Chamber music recital performance and research preparation. Full chamber music recital given during term registered. Prerequisite: Acceptance in MM degree and Instructor consent.

MUS 551 — Research and Solo Recital, 3 credits (CIP 50.0901)
Solo recital performance and preparation. Full recital given during term registered. Prerequisites: acceptance in MM degree and Instructor consent.

MUS 584 — Chamber Ensemble, 1 credit (CIP 50.0901)
Students work in ensembles with intensive performing preparation. Includes but is not limited to: brass quintet, clarinet ensemble, Gamelan ensemble, guitar ensemble, percussion ensemble, saxophone ensemble, string quartet, jazz combo, and vocal ensemble. Available for most instruments and voice. Auditioned. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 594 — Chamber Choir, 1 credit (CIP 50.0901)
A select ensemble dedicated to the highest levels of artistic choral singing. Performs a full spectrum of the finest classical choral literature, from the Renaissance to newly composed and commissioned works. Open to all SOU students by audition. Performs quarterly concerts at SOU and takes an annual tour. Group members should plan to sing for the full year. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 595 — Symphonic Band, 1 credit (CIP 50.0901)
Develops individual performance abilities in a large-group framework. Literature covers a wide range of symphonic music appropriate for band. Auditioned. May be repeated for credit.

Modified Courses
MUP 590 — Applied Music – change to 2 or 4 credits each; change "band" to "band conducting".
MUS 121 — Music Theory I – add to prerequisites: pass entrance exam or MUS 100.
MUS 202 — Music of Nonwestern Culture – rename Music of the World.
MUS 204 — Rock and Popular Music – omit recommended course.
MUS 292 — Piano Proficiency – change credits from 2 credits to 0-2 credits.
MUS 315 — Business of Music – additional content added to description.
MUS 323 — Fundamentals of Conducting – may be offered in alternating years.
MUS 324 — Instrumental Conducting – offered in alternating years.
MUS 325 — Choral Conducting – offered in alternating years.
MUS 331 — Percussion Methods – offered in alternating years.
MUS 332 — Woodwind Methods – offered in alternating years.
MUS 333 — Brass Methods – offered in alternating years.
MUS 445 — Special Topic: Theory – add MUS 545 component (445/545); add completion of piano proficiencies to prerequisites.
MUS 446 — Theory in Performance – add MUS 546 component (446/546).
MUS 460 — Special Topic: History – add MUS 560 component (460/560).

Deleted Courses
MUS 406 — Collegium Musicum (Early Music Ensemble)
MUS 495/595 — University-Civic Wind Ensemble

Changes to Major
Requirements for Major:

  • #5 omit assessment project alternative
  • #6 pass MUP 390 hearing after taking 3 terms of MUP 390.

Music Core: add MUS 195 and 197 to choices.
Music Electives (upper division): add MUS 356 and 444 to course choices.
Music Instruction Concentration: increase credits for MUP 390 to 6 credits (2 each term).
Music Composition Concentration: for Special Topic: History, omit specification of MUS 460.

Changes to graduate degrees
Offer two options for the Master of Music in Conducting degree—a traditional two-year academic residency degree, or summer only program through American Band College. Both programs are 45 credits. Traditional program requires 24 credits from MUP 590, 15 credits from MUSs 540, 541, 542, 543, 544, 545,546, or 560, and 6 credits from MUS 550.


MUSIC-BUSINESS

Increase music requirements from 45 credits to 46 credits; substantial revision to music requirements:

  • Pass a new student hearing on their major instrument
  • Pass all sequential music theory and aural skills courses with C or better.
  • Take MUS 292 until successful completion of piano proficiency exam.
  • Music majors taking applied lessons (MU 190-490) are required to perform before a jury at the end of each term; pass MUP 390 hearing after taking 3 terms of MUP 390.
  • Required music courses have changed as follows
    • Omit MUP 170, MUS 100, 202, 203, 204, 360, 361, 362, and internship.
    • Add MUS 165, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, MUP 190 (3 terms), MUP 290 (3 terms), MUS 315, 355, 356, and 9 credits of upper division electives.

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

New course
NAS 370 — Introduction to Intertribal Dance, Part Two, 4 credits (CIP 04.0202)
Discussion of Native American perspective, traditional and contemporary concepts, and how relevant teachings are related and initiated by the dancer to modern society. Provides a mastery of the pow wow's basic structure, protocol, and key participants. Periodic dance class to continue mastery of intertribal dance. Overall, this class will reflect the teachings, understanding, participation, and respect of self as a dancer, and its application to community and modern society. Prerequisite: NAS 270.

Changes to minor
Add NAS 370 to course choices.


PHYSICS

New Course
PH 306 — Sustainability: Materials Technology and Design, 3 credits (CIP 14.1201)
Introduction to basic properties of building materials (e.g., strength, heat transport), concepts of design (e.g., day-lighting, passive solar) and technologies (e.g., photovoltaics, LED lighting). Critical analysis of life cycle, performance characteristics, environmental impact and sustainability of conventional and new approaches. Prerequisites: upper division standing and completion of all lower division University Studies requirements. Cross-listed with ENGR 306. Approved for University Studies (Integration).

Changes to degree
Physics-Engineering Dual Degree option: clarify that SOU students complete most of the requirements for the SOU upper division electives of physics-engineering dual degree option.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

New Courses
PS 421/521 — International Law, 4 credits (CIP 45.0901)
International Law will introduce students to the fundamental building blocks of law in the international context. The principal inquiries will include the concept of law in the transnational context, treaties, custom, the status of states, sovereignty, norms of diplomacy, and the permissible use of force.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

PS 451, 452, 453 U.S. Foreign Relations, 4 credits each (cross-listed with HST 451, 452, 453).

Modified Courses
PS 260 — Politics and Film – renumber PS 360.
PS 398 — Research Methods – renumber PS 300 and rename Research and Writing, modify description, cross-list with HST 300; prerequisite junior or senior standing.

Suspended Courses
PS 350 — World Politics

Changes to major
Track 1: Politics, Law, and Strategic Studies: update course titles for some courses
Track 2: Community Organizing

  • Students take 4-12 credits of PS 409 (Practicum), and select the remainder of their courses from a list of 9 courses, to reach 32 credits.

PSYCHOLOGY

New Course
PSY 525 — Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders, 1 credit
Acquaints students with the concepts of chemical dependence and co-occurring disorders (dual diagnoses). Substance abuse is a disease that impacts the individual, the entire family system, and the community. This course will explore the developmental models of addiction and the theories and etiology of addictions as well as strategies for prevention and intervention. Prerequisite: acceptance into the MCH program.

Modified Courses
PSY 317 — Personal and Social Adjustment – add PSY 202 as prerequisite.
PSY 438/538 — Group Dynamics – change prerequisite from COMM 125 to PSY 202.
PSY 498, 499 — Psychology Capstone Project – increase credits to 4 credits each.

Changes to degrees
Requirements for major: in #3, increase minimum to 57 credits in psychology, at least 36 of which must be upper division; add to footnote at end: PSY 228 and 229 should be successfully completed by the end of the junior year.
Psychology Degree Completion Program – correct text and replace "human service major" with "psychology major". Requirements: in #5, omit PSY 427.


SOCIAL SCIENCES, POLICY, AND CULTURE

New Courses
SSPC 401/501 — Research, credits to be arranged (maximum16 credits) CIP 45.0101

SSPC 498/598 — Internship, 2 to 6 credits
Provides on-site experience at an educational, governmental, nongovernmental, or industrial organization for a minimum of ten hours a week. Students apply methods and techniques to problems such as land use planning, resource management, cartography, business, and industry. Completion of 24 credits of upper division coursework. Cross-listed with ES/GEOG 498/598.

Other changes
List geography program (including minor and course descriptions) and land use planning minor in SSPC catalog section, as well as environmental studies catalog section.


SOCIOLOGY

New Courses
SOC 343 — Gender and the Body, 4 credits (CIP 05.0207)
Explores how bodies are gendered in social contexts with an emphasis on U.S. society and Western culture. May include, but is not limited to, an exploration of women's and men's body images, identities, relationships with food and eating, health and health care, sexualities, (dis)abilities, bodies and sports, commodification, reproduction, deviant bodies, trangendered bodies and intersexuality. Examines gendered bodies as expressions of the self and of society, as objects of social control, and as sites of resistance and transformation. May be applied to the Women's Studies minor. Prerequisite: SOC 204 or WS 201 and completion of all lower division University Studies requirements. Approved for University Studies (Integration). Cross-listed with WS 343.

Modified Courses
SOC 310 — Community Studies – approved for University Studies (Integration).
SOC 420 — Environmental Sociology – cross-list as ES 420.

Changes to major
Sociology Core Courses: add SOC 343 to upper division elective choices.


THEATRE ARTS

New Courses
TA 201, 202 — Shakespeare, 4 credits (cross-listed with ENG 201, 202)
Offers a chronological study of a representative selection of comedies, histories, and tragedies. Involves a critical oral and written examination of the plays from the text and productions. (Cross-listed with ENG 201, 202.)

Modified Courses
TA 453 — Topics in World Drama – add prerequisite of junior standing.

Courses removed from suspension
TA 168 Play Reading, 3 credits
Offers an intensive analysis and discussion of key works in dramatic literature. This course may be applied to the BA/BS dramatic literature requirement.

Deleted Courses
D 192 — Dance Lab I
D 292 — Dance Lab II

Note: throughout theatre arts catalog section, change references from "department" to "program".


UNIVERSITY SEMINAR

New Course
WR 226 — Research Writing for Academic Success, 4 credits
Focuses on the types of writing needed for academic success, with a strong emphasis on research, close reading, and writing for a variety of disciplines. Reserved for transfer students with 24 credits or more, this course is designed for on-line delivery and provides students with instruction and practice in meeting goals and proficiencies in the Foundational strands of Communication, Thinking, and Information Literacy. Additionally, the course develops advanced writing styles, writing techniques, and audience/readership considerations by providing practice in the kinds of challenging thinking, reading, and writing required in the discourse communities that make up the academy. Counts as 4 of the required credits of writing of University Studies. Prerequisite: WR 121 or its equivalent.

Modified Courses
USEM 101, 102, 103 — University Seminar – list course descriptions separately, with details for each term of the sequence. USEM 102: prerequisite USEM 101; USEM 103: prereq USEM 102.
USEM 185 — Introduction to Expository Writing – specify that course can be taken for credit three times.
USEM 209 — Practicum – change credits to "1 to 4 credits."
USEM 225 — University Seminar for Transfers: "Worlds and Writing" – change to WR 225; minor description change; counts as 4 of the required credits of writing of University Studies.
USEM 409 — Practicum – change credits to "1 to 4 credits."

Deleted Course
USEM 225 — University Seminar for Transfers: "Worlds and Writing" [changed to WR 225]


WOMEN'S STUDIES

New Course
WS 343 — Gender and the Body, 4 credits (CIP 05.0207)
Explores how bodies are gendered in social contexts with an emphasis on U.S. society and Western culture. May include, but is not limited to, an exploration of women's and men's body images, identities, relationships with food and eating, health and health care, sexualities, (dis)abilities, bodies and sports, commodification, reproduction, deviant bodies, trangendered bodies and intersexuality. Examines gendered bodies as expressions of the self and of society, as objects of social control, and as sites of resistance and transformation. May be applied to the Women's Studies minor. Prerequisite: SOC 204 or WS 201 and completion of all lower division University Studies requirements. Approved for University Studies (Integration). Cross-listed with SOC 343.

Changes to minor
In electives, omit WS 399 (Gender and the Body) and replace with WS 343.


BUSINESS

New Courses
BA 230 — Wine Appreciation, 2 credits (CIP 52.0101)
Provides an overview of the world of wine. The course examines the relationship between winery, distributorship and the retail-restaurant world as it applies to today's ever-changing market; compares and contrasts wine methodology, viticultural practices and winery-retail-restaurant management; and establishes and explores guidelines for working in the wine industry on every level, including winery, wine distribution and restaurant-retail businesses with in-depth consideration of the needs of the northwest region. Guest speakers and class presentations are a valuable part of this class. Students must be 21 years old by the first day of class.

BA 416/516 — Healthcare Delivery for Aging Services, 4 credits (CIP 52.9999)
Explores challenges and solutions for delivering healthcare to older adults in a variety of settings including private homes, hospital clinics and senior housing environments. Explores financial models and health information systems. Prerequisites: BA 131 and junior standing.

BA 417/517 — Technology Advances in Aging Services, 2 credits (CIP 52.9999)
Explores the use of technology designed to improve life quality for older adults by enhancing independence, improving healthcare delivery, creating better access to information, and promoting wellness. Prerequisites: BA 131 and junior standing.

BA 483 — Sustainable Organizational Leadership, 4 credits (CIP 52.9999).
Students explore their roles as organizational leaders from various perspectives on organizational sustainability including alternative transportation, waste reduction, renewable energy, green building, corporate social responsibility, fair trade, localization, community finance, and other emerging sustainable business practices. Familiarizes students with important concepts, principles, and frameworks relating to the sustainability movement including natural capitalism, triple-bottom-line, and the three E's of sustainability: Economy, Environment, and Equity. Applied focus with emphasis on each student's specific organizational context and future leadership aspirations. Prerequisites: BA 131, 211, ES 210. Cross-listed with MM 583.

BA 490/590 — Case Studies in Corporate Sustainability, 4 credits (CIP 52.9999).
Introduces students to a variety of contemporary organizational case studies in sustainable business. Familiarizes students with many of the corporate leaders who are at the forefront of the sustainable business movement. In addition to case studies covered in class, each student is required to research and present an in-depth case study on an organization or particular area of interest in the sustainable business movement. Prerequisites: BA 131, 211, ES 210. Cross-listed with MM 590.

MM 590 — Case Studies in Corporate Sustainability, 4 credits (CIP 52.9999).
Introduces students to a variety of contemporary organizational case studies in sustainable business. Familiarizes students with many of the corporate leaders who are at the forefront of the sustainable business movement. In addition to case studies covered in class, each student is required to research and present an in-depth case study on an organization or particular area of interest in the sustainable business movement. Prerequisites: BA 131, 211, ES 210. Cross-listed with BA 490.

Modified Courses
BA 300 — Management of Aging Services – renumber BA 200, and rename Management of Aging Services Overview; decrease to 2 credits. Modify description.
BA 209 — Practicum – rename Hospitality Practicum; change to 2 credits, add course description specifying that it is intended for hospitality students.
BA 306 — Special Topics in Management of Aging Services – modify description to omit possible topics; omit prerequisite.
BA 320 — Business, Government, and Nonprofits – approved for University Studies (Synthesis and Integration).
BA 400/500 — Organizational Management of Aging Services – rename Organizational Leadership in Aging Services; modify description. Omit prerequisites.
BA 406/506 — Management of Aging Services Operations – rename Senior Housing Operations Management; modify description; omit prerequisites.
BA 409/509 — Practicum – modify and expand course description.
BA 420/520 — Trends and Research in Aging Services – modify description.
BA 422/522 — Financial Management of Aging Services – modify description.
BA 424/524 — Marketing of Aging Services – increase to 4 credits; modify description; omit prereq.
BA 426/526 — Development and Construction of Aging Services – rename Development and Construction in Aging Services; modify description, omit prerequisite.
BA 447/547 — International Marketing – approved for University Studies (Integration).
BA 460/560 — Nonprofit Accounting and Financial Management – separate into BA 460A/560A and BA 460B/560B. Increase credits from 2 credits each to 4 credits each. BA 460A/560A is open only to accounting majors. BA 460B/560B has slightly modified description, and is open to all majors.
BA 465B/565B — CPA Review: Business and Regulation – change prerequisites by omitting BA 365, 370, and adding BA 226, 453.
BA 477/577 — International Business – in prereqs, remove BA 374;approved for University Studies (Integration).
BA 480/580 — Nonprofit Theory and Leadership – approved for University Studies (Integration).
BA 481/581 — Principles of Human Resource Management – approved for University Studies (Integration).
BA 487/587 — Health, Safety, and Risk Management – rename Property and Casualty Risk Management.

Deleted Courses
BA 283 — Advanced Business Applications of Word Processing and Electronic Presentations

Changes to major
Requirements for major: revise wording for #4 to "Students must have a minimum 2.5 GPA in SOU business administration courses required for graduation."

Accounting concentration: in Public Accounting and Management Accounting tracks, update BA 460 to BA 460A.

Management concentration: in Electives, update BA 460 to BA 460B.

Management of Aging Services concentration: update BA 300 (4 credits) to BA 200 (2 credits); omit BA 306; update course titles for BA 400, 406; increase credits for BA 424 to 4 credits. 2 credits electives from BA 417, 420, 426.

New Degree Proposal
Bachelor of Applied Science in Management (BAS): for students who have completed an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree. Allows students with associate's degree in a technical field to transfer in 90-124 credits and complete the remaining requirements for the BAS at SOU.

Requirements include:

  • 9 credits lower division business courses from BA 100, 211, 213
  • 40 credits upper division business courses from BA 330, 374, 380, 382, 385, 407, 475, 476, 481, 409
  • 16 upper division electives (from approved list, or by advisor approval)

New Certificate Proposal
Certificate in Sustainability Leadership (CSL)
32-credit interdisciplinary program to prepare individuals for leadership roles in organizations committed to sustainable practices. The certificate may be awarded to students who have previously earned a bachelor's degree (graduate level), or upon completion of a bachelor's degree (undergraduate level). Curriculum includes:

  • Prerequisites for undergraduates: BA 131, 211, 210 (12 credits)
  • Required core (24 credits): ES 420, ES 421; BA 374; BA 374, BA483, BA490; SOC 420.
  • Elective options (8 credits) chosen from anthropology, biology, geography, geology, outdoor adventure leadership, history, Native American studies, physics, political science, psychology, and sociology.

New Certificate Proposal
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Management of Aging Services (MAS): - a 36-credit program consisting of seven required courses, two of the four Management of Aging Services elective courses, and an additional 10 elective credits in a focus area approved by the coordinator.

  • Required Core (22 credits) includes BA 516, 500, 506, 522, 524; PSY 566, 567.
  • MAS Electives (4 credits): choose from BA 517, 520, 526
  • Support Area Electives (10 credits): choose from BA 320/PS 321, BA 324, 330, 331, 412, 575, 576, 581; COMM 324, 340; EC 345, 325; HE 325, 362; PSY 317, 565.

New Certificate Proposal
International Business Certificate (IBC): a 36-credit program consisting of 20 credits of core courses, 4 "Global Units" of 16 credits from a combination of international exchange, internship with an international business or international office, attendance in an approved international conference, and elective courses. Open to undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students (all courses are undergraduate level).

Curriculum includes:

  • Prerequisites of BA 211, 330, 374; EC 202.
  • Required Core Courses (20 credits): IS 250 or ANTH 213; BA 447, BA 473 or ED/IS 320, BA 477, 4 credits foreign language approved by certificate coordinator
  • Required electives (16 credits = 4 Global Units): Students earn global units by the following methods:
    1. International Exchange (1-4 global units possible) in summer programs, 4 month programs and year-long programs (international students earn 4 global units for 1 year at SOU)
    2. Internship with international business or office (1-2 global units possible)
    3. Attendance/participation in international conference (1-2 global units possible)
    4. Elective courses (1-3 global units possible; each 4-credit course = 1 global unit): courses chosen from COMM 441, 460C; ED 321, 389; GEOG 330, 336, 338;GEOG/IS 360; IS 320; IS/PS 350; PS 355, 454; SOC 345; WS 301.

BUSINESS-CHEMISTRY

Changes to Chemistry requirements: add CH 316 (Chemical Research Communication III) and increase chemistry requirements to 41 credits.


EDUCATION

New Courses
ED 505 — Reading and Conference
Credits to be arranged.

SPED 509B — Fall Practicum, 1 credit
As a follow-up to the September Experience, the special education candidate begins to assume instructional, case management, and other activities of the special education teacher. The candidate will support their mentor by providing one-on-one and small group instruction, attending IEP and MDT meetings, collaborating with general education teachers, and any other activity related to the role of the special educator. Foci for the Fall Practicum will be in reading instruction, gaining skills in assessing students, conducting functional behavioral assessments, and preparing for the winter work sample. Candidates will maintain a journal and gather specific information regarding assessments, curriculum, students, and ways in which services are scheduled. Activities associated with SPED 523L, 525L, and 529L will be conducted throughout the Fall Practicum.

SPED 529 — Interventions in Academic Skills –Reading Methods , 3 credits
Students will extend their study of the classroom teaching processes by integrating information and knowledge from other courses taken during the fall term into the study of learning to read and best practices in reading instruction. Emphasis will be placed on effective strategies for standards-based reading education, assessment, and creating effective learning experiences for diverse learners. Intended for students in the Stand Alone endorsement program.

SPED 529L Interventions in Academic Skills –Reading Methods Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides the students opportunities to gain practical experience in designing and implementing reading instruction in their field setting. Instructional plans designed during this lab will serve as the basis for the winter and spring work samples. Intended for students in the Stand Alone endorsement program.

SPED 530 Law and Policy, 4 credits
Provides an overview of laws and litigation affecting special education. Includes the development of laws that govern special education beginning with P.L. 94-142 through the current re-authorization of IDEIA, a review of §504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The course will also include a review of major litigation since 1954 that has shaped and continues to influence special education practices. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 531 Family and Community Services, 3 credits
Discusses collaboration and consultation with parents, colleagues in general and special education, and community agencies. Addresses diversity and cultural competence from a social justice perspective. Students are expected to have the knowledge and ability to communicate with agencies outside the school that impact individuals with disabilities. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 531L Family and Community Services Lab, 1 credit
As part of September Experience, students will utilize the information from SPED 531: Family and Community Services to detail the roles and responsibilities of the special educator and support staff within the special education setting; begin working in collaboration with either a MAT preservice teacher or a general educator in the general education setting; and describe the learning environment within the special education and general education settings. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 532 Administration and Interpretation of Assessments, 3 credits
This course prepares teachers to interpret results from standardized norm referenced assessments as well as teacher made, curriculum based assessment instruments commonly used in public schools. Covers writing assessment reports as well as interpreting the reports of others and explaining the results to parents and other teachers. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 532L Administration and Interpretation of Assessments Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides students the opportunity to extend their skills in conducting administering formal and informal assessments, and interpreting the results to targeted students in the field setting. This lab is a major component of the Winter Term Work Sample. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 533 Behavior Management, 3 credits
Introduces the theory, vocabulary, principles, and techniques for fostering a learning environment with a positive atmosphere. Includes a variety of management models, ways to preserve the dignity and human rights of students with disabilities, and legal and district policy responsibilities regarding behavior and behavior management. Students will learn strategies for assessing individual and group behavior, and apply theories to develop behavior management plans for both groups and individual students. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 533L Behavior Management Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides students the opportunity to gain practical experience to conduct functional behavioral analyses, develop behavioral intervention plans, and implement the plans in the field setting. The lab also provides students opportunities to begin to understand how classroom and behavior management strategies and techniques apply in the field. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 534 Interventions in Academic Skills - Mathematics Methods, 3 credits
This course is designed to provide instruction in the planning, development, and implementation of academic curriculum and lessons for the student with special needs, with emphasis on mathematics. Modifying the general education curriculum, developing parallel curriculum, and providing supplemental curriculum are major topics. Emphasis is on creating opportunities for students with special needs to succeed in a general education setting by utilizing appropriate modifications whenever possible. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 534L Interventions in Academic Skills - Mathematics Methods Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides students the opportunity to use their skills to design and implement effective instruction to targeted students in the field setting. This lab, along with SPED 532L, is a major component of the Winter Term Work Sample. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 535 Interventions in Functional Skills, 3 credits
This course develops students' skills in designing interventions for students with severe disabilities. Includes instruction in self-help skill development, social skills, home-living management, recreational activities, dietary instruction, and a variety of living and family-life skills. Discusses transitions from early educational settings to those provided for the older student, with a primary focus on the transition from school to community life. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 535L Interventions in Functional Skills Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides the students the opportunity spend extended time in a variety of special education settings. Students will be assigned to observe and work in severe needs and other special education setting as a part of this and other lab activities. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 536 IEP Development, 3 credits
Covers the preparation, development, implementation, and evaluation of the IEP and all of the review procedures relating to individualized programming. Prepares special education teachers to plan and conduct meetings in accordance with federal, state, and district regulations. Bridges information gained in assessment and interventions classes and provides practical experience in developing programs based on that information. Introduces technology appropriate to the development and maintenance of records. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 536L IEP Development Lab, 1 credit
Through lab experience students will develop IEPs for a variety of students in the field setting. Students will become familiar with the development and implementation of the IEP. This experience will set the foundation for the student leading IEP meetings during the Spring Term. In addition, the IEP will be the framework for the Winter Work Sample. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 538 Characteristics of Exceptionalities, 3 credits
Focuses on the categories of exceptionalities included in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and Oregon OARs. The course will include information about causes of exceptionalities, definitions for each category of eligibility, and criteria for identifying students under each eligibility category. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 538L Characteristics of Exceptionalities Lab, 1 credit
As part of September Experience, students will utilize the information from SPED 538: Characteristics of Exceptionalities to detail the case load of their mentor teacher or current special education placement; describe the characteristics of students within the case load; and begin to document strategies and techniques to engage learners in a variety of settings. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 539 Interventions in Academic Skills –Reading Methods, 3 credits
Students will extend their study of the classroom teaching processes by integrating information and knowledge from other courses taken during the fall term into the study of learning to read and best practices in reading instruction. Emphasis will be placed on effective strategies for standards-based reading education, assessment, and creating effective learning experiences for diverse learners. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 539L Interventions in Academic Skills –Reading Methods Lab, 1 credit
This lab experience provides the students opportunities to gain practical experience in designing and implementing reading instruction in their field setting. Instructional plans designed during this lab will serve as the basis for the winter and spring work samples. Intended for students in the Dual endorsement program.

SPED 540 Student Teaching, 4 credits
Assist Special Education teacher to deliver services to students with special needs; conduct formal and informal assessments of students within the special education setting or other identified students; attend special education related meetings; collaborate with special and general education colleagues, complete field work required for other classes.

Modified Courses
ED 251 — Introduction to Teaching – approved for University Studies (Explorations).
ED 252 — Introduction to Social Foundations in Education – approved for University Studies (Explorations).
ED 459 — Foundations of Education – create ED 559 component (ED 459/559); approved for University Studies (Integration).
ED 463 — Reading/Language Arts Methods – rename Reading and Language Arts Methods I, II; change credits to 3 credits each.
ED 471 — Inclusion Strategies – create ED 571 component (ED 471/571).
ED 488/588 — Early Language and Literacy Development – minor description addition.
ED 500 — Professional Development – change credits to 1-6 credits.
ED 503 — Thesis – rename Thesis/Project.
ED 509 — Practicum – change credits from 1 to 2 credits to "1 to 9 credits".
ED 519 — Action Research as an Approach to School Improvement – modify description.
ED 533 — Advanced Curriculum Work Sample – minor description modification.
ED 538 — Mathematics in the Elementary School – omit specifying commercially prepared programs.
ED 561 — Advanced Educational Psychology – minor rewording in part of description.
ED 571 — Middle School Curriculum – renumber ED 574.
ED 575 — Reading Comprehension, K-12 – omit prerequisites.
SPED 509 — September Practicum – Change to SPED 509A [SPED 509B is new course]; change credits to 1 credit; not repeatable.
SPED 528 — Medical Aspects of Special Education and Characteristics of Disabilities – rename Characteristics of Exceptionalities.
SPED 528L — Medical Aspects of Special Education and Characteristics of Disabilities – rename Characteristics of Exceptionalities Lab.

Add the following statement "Intended for students in the Stand Alone endorsement program" to the end of the course descriptions for SPED 520, 521, 521L, 522, 522L, 523, 523L, 524, 524L, 525, 525L, 526, 526L, 528, 528L.

Deleted Courses
ED 552 — Student Teaching: Early Childhood
ED 559 — Foundations/Research I, II [paired with ED 459 Foundations of Education]
SPED 527 — Theory and Tools of Assessment
SPED 527L — Theory and Tools of Assessment Lab

Changes to Major
BA/BS in Elementary Education

  • BA/BS in Elementary Education also offered for non-licensure.
  • Revise requirements for Elementary Education major to reflect both licensure and non-licensure options.
  • Elementary Education with license: Pedagogy strand increases from 39 to 42 credits.
  • Content Knowledge/University Studies: Humanities Explorations - change requirements to one Art History course, one English literature course, and one Music course; Social Science Explorations: change HE 240 to one Health course (HE 250 recommended); omit the "Additional Content Knowledge Courses."
  • Pre-License Major Elective Options; add WR 241, 312; ART 429; MUS 372, ED/ENG 398, ED 430.
  • In Pedagogy Strand, add MUS 373, ED 434, 459.
  • In Field Experience Strand, age/grade level experiences include one primary K-3, one upper elementary 4-6.
  • Add requirements for Pedagogy and Field Experience Strands (Major without licensure). (already approved by Curriculum Committee and Faculty Senate in Fall 2008).

Changes to Minor
Requirements for minor: substitute DMF 201/201L for AM 233.

Graduate-level changes

  • Omit paragraph for Educational Administrator License Program and Initial Administrator License Program; replace with revised paragraph describing both programs.
  • MAT – Part-time program renamed Two-year program; authorization levels/grades adjusted.
  • MAT Instructional Courses: add ED 519; update course title for ED 559.
  • MAT Field Experience – increase credits to 27; list courses required.
  • Special Education Programs; many slight revisions and refinements. Update lists of courses with new course numbers to distinguish Dual programs from Stand Alone program. Dual Endorsement requirements decrease from 39-42 to 36 credits; Dual + Master's program decreases from 58-61 to 55 credits. Stand-Alone program decreases from 70 to 65 credits.

CERTIFICATES

Postbaccalaurate Certificate in Accounting

In admittance requirements, omit USEM 101, 102, 103, or WR 121, 122, and 4 credits in math above level of intermediate algebra. In electives, change BA 460 to BA 460A.

Certificate in Native American Studies

New course
NAS 370 — Introduction to Intertribal Dance, Part Two, 4 credits (CIP 04.0202)
Discussion of Native American perspective, traditional and contemporary concepts, and how relevant teachings are related and initiated by the dancer to modern society. Provides a mastery of the pow wow's basic structure, protocol, and key participants. Periodic dance class to continue mastery of intertribal dance. Overall, this class will reflect the teachings, understanding, participation, and respect of self as a dancer, and its application to community and modern society. Prerequisite: NAS 270.

Changes to certificate
Add NAS 370 to course choices.

Certificate in Nonprofit Management

In Core Courses, change BA 460/560 to BA 460B/560B


GRADUATE STUDIES

[this section is not complete 1/15/09]

Master of Business Administration

Modified Courses
MBA 520 — Applied Economics and Financial Analysis for Business – rename Economic Analysis; modify description.
MBA 590 — Capstone – modify description.

Master in Management

New Courses
MM 522 — Orientation to Capstone Experience, 1 credit
Serves as an extension of the introductory orientation seminar. Designed to increase students' understanding of and readiness for the capstone experience, the course introduces students to requirements, expectations, and procedures related to the MiM capstone project. Includes advanced search techniques for online databases, review and evaluation of capstone reports, and attendance at formal capstone presentations. Graded P/NP. Prerequisite: MM 520.

MM 583 — Sustainable Organizational Leadership, 4 credits
Students explore their roles as organizational leaders from various perspectives on organizational sustainability including alternative transportation, waste reduction, renewable energy, green building, corporate social responsibility, fair trade, localization, community finance, and other emerging sustainable business practices. Familiarizes students with important concepts, principles, and frameworks relating to the sustainability movement including natural capitalism, triple-bottom-line, and the three E's of sustainability: Economy, Environment, and Equity. Applied focus with emphasis on each student's specific organizational context and future leadership aspirations. Cross-listed with BA 483.

MM 588 — Fundamentals of Project Management, 4 credits
Provides a foundation for managing projects of all sizes for any type of organization. Covers the five traditional phases of project management and includes assessments to prepare the individual, organization, and team for project management. Introduces students to project management software and provides templates. Students apply concepts in a term project. Cross-listed with BA 588.

MM 590 — Case Studies in Corporate Sustainability, 4 credits (CIP 52.9999).
Introduces students to a variety of contemporary organizational case studies in sustainable business. Familiarizes students with many of the corporate leaders who are at the forefront of the sustainable business movement. In addition to case studies covered in class, each student is required to research and present an in-depth case study on an organization or particular area of interest in the sustainable business movement. Cross-listed with BA 490.

MM 592 — Working with Emotional Intelligence, 4 credits
Introduces the Emotional Intelligence core competencies identified by Daniel Goleman and how to apply them in a leadership role. This class will include theory, experiential, and application activities that incorporate the emotional intelligence framework to resolve conflicts, promote successful outcomes, and lead with authenticity. Students will begin with an exploration of self and build from that awareness to social awareness through weekly reflections, class dialogue, and practice using current life situations. Sharpening emotional intelligence skills will enhance relationships with self, family, friends and co-workers, and will strengthen leadership skills. These practices can be applied immediately in both personal and professional arenas.

Modified Courses
MM 509 — Practicum – Graded P/NP.

Deleted Courses
MM 521 — Society, Ethics, and Management

Changes to degree
In Curriculum, change Society, Ethics and Management (MM 521) to Orientation to Capstone Experience (MM 522).

Master of Science in Environmental Education

Applications are reviewed January 15 and April 15 (omit Oct 15 review).


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

McNair Program
In General Program Requirements, revise eligibility to include more underrepresented groups.

Preprofessional Programs

  • Chiropractic Medicine: change GPA recommendation from "at least a 3.0 GPA" to "a GPA greater than 3.0."
  • Dental Hygiene: revise and shorten text; omit PSY 201, HE 325, and CS 115 from suggested First Year program.
  • Optometry: In Suggested Program, Second Year, omit BI 343 and add BI 340. In Third Year, omit BI 330 and replace with BI 361, 362, 363. Decrease University Studies Integration credits to 6-8 credits (Humanities and Social Sciences), and total third year credits are 42-46. Total credits for program are 140-144.

Study Abroad Programs
Australia: add program at James Cook University.