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Southern Oregon University

Degrees and Programs

Add to Explorations Humanities courses:  FR 220, MUS 204, WR 241.
Add to Explorations Social Sciences courses:  GEOG 108, IS 250; omit HST 112.
Add to Explorations Sciences courses: CS 210, G 103, PH/ENGR 174, PH/ENGR 176.
Add to Integration, Strand H (Science, Technology, and Society): G 304, G 330, G 353; update course titles for GEOG 386 and PHL 330.
Add to Integration, Strand I (Citizenship and Social Responsibility): HST 385, SOC 310; update course titles for BA 480, GEOG/IS 360; correct COMM 460A to COMM 460B.
Add to Integration, Strand J: ARTH 344, BA 447, 475, 477, ED/ENG 398, ED 460, WS 302.

Changes to BA/BS requirements:
BA degree: Add CAS, SSPC prefixes to BA course prefixes.
BS degree:  in #1, change 8 credits to 7 credits.  Update course title for GEOG 386.  In #2, add CAS, DMF, and SSPC prefixes to course prefixes.

Transfer student policies:n #2, add completion of OTM.
Omit #6 and #7 (and phantom #5)


University Seminar

Modified Courses
USEM 101H, 102H, 103H     University Seminar Honors – specify that it is for students who have been designated as Honors Students.
USEM 185    Introduction to Expository Writing – may be repeated for credit.
USEM 225    University Seminar for Transfers: Worlds and Writing – increase to 4 credits.
USEM 409    Advanced Practicum – minor description change.


ANTHROPOLOGY

(separate from former Sociology and Anthropology)

Modified Courses
ANTH 318    Native North America – approved for Synthesis (as well as Integration).
ANTH 450    Culture Change – change prereq to ANTH 213.
ANTH 451    Ecology of Small-Scale Societies – rename Cultural Ecology; new description; change prereqs to ANTH 211 and 213, or ANTH 211 and the ES Social Science sequence.
ANTH 455    Anthropological Film – omit prereq of 4 credits of upper division anthropology.
ANTH 460    Applied Anthropology – change “subcultural” to “cultural.”

Changes to major
Requirements for major:  
•    #2, all requirements must be taken for a letter grade, except practicum and capstone;
•    #4, omit EC 232 from Quantitative Reasoning choices.
Core courses:  in #2, omit ANTH 375 from course choices

Changes to minor
Update course title for ANTH 211.

Changes to certificate
Certificate in Cultural Resource Management:  increase from 35 credits to 36 credits.
Core courses: substitute ANTH 211 for ANTH 301
Add Knowledge Skills as #2:  12 credits, from ES 386, G 481, ES 451.
Policy Perspectives:  renumber #3; choose one course (4 credits) instead of two courses.
Specialized Skills:  omit
Specialized Focus: change to Practicum and Capstone, and allow either ES or Anthropology capstone, in consultation with major advisor.


APPLIED MULTIMEDIA

Modified Courses
AM 233    Introduction to Multimedia – omit lecture hours from description; prereq is basic computer skills.
AM 250    Digital Photography – omit lecture hours from description
AM 334    Design for Multimedia – omit lecture hours from description.
AM 335    Digital Video - omit lecture hours from description.
AM 336    Multimedia Authoring - omit specific software and lecture hours from description.
AM 337    Web Authoring – update software in description.
AM 338    Web Interface Design, Graphics, and Animation – minor description change.


ART AND ART HISTORY

New Courses
ARTH 204H Art History Honors Seminar, 1 credit
Students complete assignments and exams in the regular ARTH 204 sequence but meet bi-weekly in a two hour seminar class to discuss additional assigned readings and topics that provide a more in-depth study in the history of art. Prerequisite: honors student status or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 205H Art History Honors Seminar, 1 credit
Students complete assignments and exams in the regular ARTH 205 sequence but meet bi-weekly in a two hour seminar class to discuss additional assigned readings and topics that provide a more in-depth study in the history of art. Prerequisite: honors student status or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 206H Art History Honors Seminar, 1 credit
Students complete assignments and exams in the regular ARTH 206 sequence but meet bi-weekly in a two hour seminar class to discuss additional assigned readings and topics that provide a more in-depth study in the history of art. Prerequisite: honors student status or permission of the instructor.

DMF 201L    Digital Media Foundations Lab, 2 credits
Students complete a series of projects combining contemporary techniques in digital photography, graphic design, and illustration.  Co-requisite:  DMF 201.

Modified Courses
ART 306    Digital Illustration – change recommended course to DMF 201.

DMF 201    Digital Media Foundations – (move out of CAS and list in both Communication section, and Art & Art History section of the catalog); separate into DMF 201 (2 credits) and DMF 201L (2 credits) for lab.  They are co-requisite courses. Modify description for DMF 201.

Changes to Major
Studio Art Option:  Upper Division (BA/BS) clarify that the 80 total credits in the major include both upper and lower division credits; Upper Division (BFA) clarify that the 108 total credits in the major include both upper and lower division credits.

Art History Option:  in Non-Art Electives, add ENG 209 and PHL 203 to choices; omit HST 112.


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

New Courses
CAS 199     Special Studies, credits to be arranged
CAS 209     Practicum, credits to be arranged
CAS 399    Special Studies, credits to be arranged

CAS 501    Research, credits to be arranged
Research that is not part of the thesis option.

CAS 502    Paper, credits to be arranged
Expositional writing that is not part of the thesis option.

CAS 503    Thesis, credits to be arranged
All research and writing for the thesis option.  A student may register for thesis credit each term.

CAS 504    Project, credits to be arranged
All work for the non-thesis option.  Focused application of principles or theories by means of various materials and methods.  Resulting in a final presentation which may take a variety of different forms.

CAS 505    Reading and Conference, credits to be arranged
A series of special consultations with a professor to test hypotheses about and comprehension of selected readings or course materials.

CAS 506    Activities, credits to be arranged
A variety of passive or peripheral experiences in which students observe essential disciplinary practices  Activities courses are used principally in journalism, music, physical education, speech, and theatre arts.  P/NP only.

CAS 507    Seminar, credits to be arranged
Special group seminars not given in a regularly scheduled course.

CAS 508    Workshop, credits to be arranged
A special course of short duration in which students receive brief sketches of information and practice applying them to a few concrete problems.

CAS 509    Practicum or Internship, credits to be arranged
Skill development and application of academic theory in the work environment.  P/NP only.

CAS 520    Introduction to Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, 3 credits
This course lays a foundation of thought that will introduce and support the multidisciplinary focus of the graduate student’s program of study.  Introduces the year’s cohort students to disciplinary and interdisciplinary research methods, theories and philosophies of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, and the ethics and practices of advanced inquiry.  Required in the first term of coursework in the CAS interdisciplinary graduate program.  Taught fall only.

CAS 521    Applying Interdisciplinary Theory, 1 credit
This seminar consists of five (5) two-to-three hour colloquies, seminar meetings, or workshops held at different times over winter and spring terms as convened by the seminar instructor(s).  Discussion centers on a pre-assigned text or academic activity (such as peer editing or comparative research).  The cohort seminars are led by graduate faculty associated with disciplines in the cohort or by interdisciplinary teams.

Modified Courses
DMF 201    Digital Media Foundations – (move out of CAS and list in both Communication section, and Art & Art History section of the catalog); separate into DMF 201 (2 credits) and DMF 201L (2 credits) for lab.  They are co-requisite courses. Modify description for DMF 201.

Deleted Courses
AL 401/501    Research
AL 403/503    Thesis
AL 405/505    Reading and Conference
AL 407/507    Seminar
AL 408/508    Workshop
AL 409/509    Practicum
AL 510    Selected Topics in Arts and Letters
SC 211, 212, 213    Explorations in Science
SC 353    Oceanography (retain G 353)
SC 401    Research
SC 403    Thesis
SC 405    Reading and Conference
SC 407/507    Seminar
SC 408    Workshop
SC 409    Practicum
SC 510    Selected  Topics in Science
SSC 351    Oregon’s Future (retain EC 351)
SSC 387    American Economic History (retain EC 387)
SSC 389    Global Economy (retain EC 389)
SSC 401    Research
SSC 403    Thesis
SSC 407/507    Workshop
SSC 409    Practicum
SSC 437/537    Conservation (retain GEOG 437/537)
SSC 439/539    Land Use Planning (retain GEOG 439/539)
SSC 510    Selected  Topics in Social Sciences
SSC 599    Pro-Seminar:  Social Science


BIOLOGY

New Courses
BI 489        Senior Research Seminar, 1 credit (CIP 26.0101)
Planning seminar for senior research to be taken spring term before the year of capstone completion.  Students discuss options to complete senior research, and develop a work plan and an annotated bibliography.  Prerequisites:  At least junior standing in Biology or consent of instructor.  Required for graduation.

Modified Courses
BI 214    Elementary Microbiology – change lab to two 80-minute labs.
BI 318    Invertebrate Natural History – correct spelling of mollusks to molluscs.
BI 342    Cell Biology – eliminate current prereqs and replace with BI 341.
BI 351    Microbiology – in prereqs, change one year of chemistry to 2 terms of chemistry; omit co-requisite of completion of all University Studies requirements.
BI 384        Ethnobotany and Cross-Cultural Communication - approved for Integration.
BI 388    Conservation of Natural Resources – add to prerequisites:  BI 101, 102; or 101, 103; or 211, 212.
BI 436/536    Algae, Fungi, and Lichens – rename Origins and Diversity of Protists and Fungi.
BI 442/542    Bryophytes – rename Bryology.
BI 444/544    Plant Identification and Field Botany – rename Vascular Plant Identification and Field Botany.
BI 446/546    Evolution – omit BI 340 prerequisite.
BI 490    Senior Research in Organismal Biology – change to 3 credits.
BI 491    Senior Research in Cell and Molecular Biology – change to 3 credits.
BI 492    Senior Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology – change to 3 credits.

Suspended Courses
BI 522    Techniques of Field Interpretation
BI 523    Natural History of the Pacific Northwest
BI 590    Natural Resource Management
BI 591    Interpretive Practices
BI 592    Environmental Education Internship

Changes to Major
Requirements for major:
•    #3, omit specification that exit exam is produced by ETS.
•    #5, for those not completing an option area, increase upper division biology electives to 20 credits.  For those completing an option area, consult option area information.
•    #5, add BI 489 to list of courses that do not count for the 20 u.d. credits.
•    #8, change credits to 12-18 credits of physical science

Capstone:
•    Option 1:  decrease capstone credits to 3 credits; add BI 489 (1 credit).
•    Option 2:  Complete BI 489, and decrease to 2 credits of BI 402 or 409.
•    Option 3:  Complete BI 489, and decrease to 3 credits of BI 402 or 409.

Option areas:
Reinstate these four option areas (suspended in 2007-08):  Cell/Molecular option, Ecology and Environmental Biology option, Botany option, Zoology option.

•    Cell/Molecular option:  16 credits from list of courses, plus an additional 4 credits from approved upper division biology electives
•    Ecology/Environmental Biology option: 16 credits from list of courses, plus an additional 4 credits from approved upper division biology electives.
•    Botany option:  complete BI 331, plus 16 credits from list of courses, and an additional 4 credits from approved upper division biology electives.
•    Zoology option:  complete BI 314, plus 16 credits from list of courses (must include at least one each invertebrate and vertebrate course), and an additional 4 credits from approved upper division biology electives.

Master of Science in Environmental Education
•    Completely revise program, and move to Graduate Studies section of the catalog.


CHEMISTRY

(add statement about chemistry program being part of CPME department)

Modified Courses
CH 314    Chemical Research Communication I – change prereq from CH 335 to CH 336.


COMMUNICATION

New Course
COMM 448/548    Mediation and Conflict Management, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course.  Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed in other departments.

DMF 201L    Digital Media Foundations Lab, 2 credits
Students complete a series of projects combining contemporary techniques in digital photography, graphic design, and illustration.  Co-requisite:  DMF 201.

Modified Courses
COMM 460/560   Topics in Communication – change title of “Communication and Technology” topic to “Communication, Culture, and Technology.”
DMF 201    Digital Media Foundations – (move out of CAS and list in both Communication section, and Art & Art History section of the catalog); separate into DMF 201 (2 credits) and DMF 201L (2 credits) for lab.  They are co-requisite courses. Modify description for DMF 201.
FLM 320    Topics in Hispanic Film – omit Spanish discussion and presentations; omit SPAN 203 prereq.
FLM 350    Topics in French Film – omit FR 203 prerequisite; omit cross-listing with FR 350.
JRN 322    Picture Editing, Layout, and Design – change JRN 241 prereq to DMF 201.
JRN 323    Advanced Photojournalistic Techniques – change JRN 241 prereq to DMF 201.

Suspended Courses
JRN 241    Introduction to Visual Journalism

Changes to Major
Requirements for the Major:  in #7, omit media studies from options.
Writing Component:  omit Media Studies from options.

Human Communication Option:
•    In electives list, add COMM 407 (Relational Communication Processes), COMM 449, and COMM 460A, 460B, and 460C.

Journalism Option:
News-Editorial
•    Replace JRN 241 with DMF 201 (Digital Media Foundations I)

Photojournalism
•    Replace JRN 241 with DMF 201 (Digital Media Foundations I)

Media Arts Option:
Video Production
•    Add VP 410 (1-4 credits) to required courses
•    Correct electives credits to at least 7 credits
•    Add VP 410 (1-4 credits) to electives

Changes to minor
Human Communication minor:
•    Move COMM 310 from required course to elective
•    Move COMM 300 from elective to required course.
•    Add to electives list:  COMM 460A, 460B, 460C; update course number for Mediation and Conflict Management.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Modified Courses
CS 210        Web Development I – wording change to prerequisite; approved for Explorations.

Changes to major
Requirements for major:
•    #2 add Web Development I/II as alternatives to Computer Science I/II; add CS 380 as alternative to CS 258.
Core Curriculum:
•    CIS majors may take CS 210 instead of CS 200, and CS 295 instead of CS 257.

Computer Programming and Software option:
•    For CS courses above the 250 level, cannot use CS 310, 346, 401, 405, 407, 409.

Computer Information Science option:
•    For CS courses above the 250 level, cannot use CS 310, 346, 401, 405, 407, 409.

Computer Science and Multimedia option
•    For CS courses above the 250 level, cannot use CS 310, 346, 401, 405, 407, 409.


CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

New Course
CCJ 448/548    Mediation and Conflict Management, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course.  Additional fees/tuition may apply. Cross-listed in other departments.

Modified Courses
CCJ 300    Essentials of Criminal Justice Research and Writing – add CCJ major to prerequisites.
CCJ 412    Law of Criminal Evidence – add CCJ 230 or 231 to prerequisites.
CCJ 413    Law of Criminal Procedures – add CCJ 230 or 231 to prerequisites.
CCJ 430/530    Crime Control Theories and Policies – add CCJ 271 to prerequisites.
CCJ 451/551    Criminal Justice Leadership – add CCJ 271 to prerequisites.
CCJ 460    Comparative Criminal Justice – add CCJ 271 to prerequisites.

Suspended Courses
CCJ 416/516    Community Policing

Changes to Major
Requirements for the Major:
•    eliminate #2 and #3, and replace with Departmental Academic Standing Policy.
•    Renumber #4 to #3; reduce electives from approved departments from 12 to 8 credits.

Upper Division courses for CCJ major:
•    Correct course number for Essentials of Criminal Justice Research and Writing
•    Electives:  omit CCJ 416, PSY 457, and HE 453.

BA/BS in CCJ with Emphasis in Forensics:
•    Move CCJ 461 to Forensic Specific courses; add CCJ 460 to u.d. requirements.
•    recommended courses for emphasis include ANTH 211, 213; BI 231-233; CCJ/CS 346; CH 100-101/L, CH 300; COMM 310; PHL 201, 205, 339.

Changes to minor
•    Choose 16 credits from a list of pre-approved courses, and courses that require advisor approval.  Update list of courses.


ECONOMICS

Modified Courses
EC 351    Oregon’s Future – remove cross-listing with SSC 351.
EC 387    American Economic History – remove cross-listing with SSC 387.
EC 389    America in the Global Economy – remove cross-listing with SSC 389.

Changes to major
International Economics Option:  omit GEOG 416 (a suspended course) from elective list.
Economics and Finance Option:  add EC 321 to elective list.
Applied Economics and Public Policy Option: replace EC 333 with EC 332 in electives list.


ENGINEERING

New Courses
ENGR 174    Digital Systems and Robotics, 3 credits (CIP 14.1001)
Introduces the basics of digital electronics and the fundamentals of robotics.  Topics include simple logic, truth tables, logic gates, voltage, currents, power, TTL chips, sensors, servos, and some practical applications.  Cross-listed with PH 174.

ENGR 176    The Science and Technology of Materials, 3 credits (CIP 14.3101)
Introduces basic concepts of materials science and the microstructure-property relationships in various classes of materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and semiconductors.
Topics include fundamentals of characterization techniques and application to science and technology.  Cross-listed with PH 176.

ENGR 474    Kinetics in Materials, 3 credits (CIP 14.3101)
Examines kinetic processes, such as diffusion, crystal growth, phase transformation, and their relationship to the structure and macroscopic behavior of the resulting materials. Topics covered include crystal interfaces and microstructure; solidification; diffusional transformation in solids; diffusionless transformations.  Prerequisite:  ENGR 323.

Deleted Courses
ENGR 474    Semiconductor Materials (never offered; replaced by new ENGR 474)


ENGLISH AND WRITING

Modified Courses
ENG 341    Class, Culture and Feminism in Victorian and Edwardian England – approved for Synthesis and Integration; change prerequisites to ENG 298 or completion of writing requirement in major department.
ENG 371    Topics in British Literature Before 1800 – add prereq of ENG 298.
ENG 372    Topics in British Literature After 1800 – add prereq of ENG 298.
ENG 381    Topics in U.S. Literature Before 1865 – add prereq of ENG 298.
ENG 382    Topics in U.S. Literature After 1865 – add prereq of ENG 298.
ENG 398    Teaching Global Perspectives Through Children’s Literature – approved for Synthesis/Integration.


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

New Courses
ES 349     Maps, Cartography, and Geospatial Technology, 4 credits
Provides a fundamental understanding of map reading and interpretation, along with the principles and techniques used in the design and compilation of maps for effective cartographic communication. Provides an overview of the geospatial technologies of global positioning systems, remote sensing, and geographic information systems. Pre-requisite: proof of proficiency in computer skills. Cross-listed with GEOG 349.

ES 386     Environmental Data Analysis, 4 credits
Applies statistical principles and techniques to environmental data. Formulates questions appropriate to statistical analysis, statistical problem solving, data collection, and documentation with particular emphasis placed on using statistics as an effective communication and decision-making tool through computer-based analysis, figure and table production, and writing. Prerequisite: MTH 243. Cross-listed with GEOG 386.  Approved for University Studies (Integration).

ES 451/551     Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, 4 credits
Explores uses of computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for analyzing environmental features and feature-related data. Desktop GIS is employed for data storage, geographic data analysis, and map design. Covers applications in forestry, planning, resource management, and demography. Prerequisite: ES 349. Cross-listed with GEOG 451/551.

ES 453/553     Introduction to Remote Sensing, 4 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to remote sensing of the environment through digital image processing of satellite data. The goal is to develop an understanding of inventorying, mapping, and monitoring earth resources through the measurement, analysis and interpretation of electromagnetic energy emanating from features of interest. Prerequisite: ES 349. Cross-listed with G/GEOG 453/553.

ES 455/555     Introduction to Global Positioning Systems, 4 credits
Covers the fundamentals of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Includes an overview of the GPS system, its operation and major sources of error. Field and lab exercises allow for GPS data collection and application of various data processing techniques including differential correction, quality control, and export to geospatial software. Prerequisite: ES 349. ES 489/589 recommended. Cross-listed with G/GEOG 455/555.

Deleted Courses
G 326        Global Positioning System (GPS)
G 487/587    Remote Sensing in Geology
G 489/589    Computer and Instrumental Methods

Changes to major
Update course numbers and titles to reflect course changes
Biology option: correct required courses to BI 317 OR BI 318; adjust credits.


FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

New Courses
FL 101, 102, 103    Special topics:  Beginning Language, 4 credits each (CIP 16.03)
This course sequence allows students to receive beginning language credit for languages not taught on a regular basis on the SOU campus.  Title and content vary according to the language taught.  May be repeated for credit when title/content change.  Languages taught may be from approved study abroad programs, NASILP self-instructional programs, or other special language programs affiliated with SOU, including Native American languages.

FL 199        Special Studies, credit to be arranged (CIP 16.03)

FL 201, 202, 203    Special Topics:  Intermediate Language, 4 credits each (CIP 16.03)
This course sequence allows students to receive intermediate language credit for languages not taught on a regular basis on the SOU campus.  Title and content vary according to the language taught.  May be repeated for credit when title/content change.  Languages taught may be from approved study abroad programs, NASILP self-instructional programs, or other special language programs affiliated with SOU, including Native American languages.  Completion of sequence meets BA language requirement.  

FL 299        Special Studies, credit to be arranged (CIP 16.03)

FL 399        Special Studies, credit to be arranged (CIP 16.03)

JPN 399    Special Studies, credit to be arranged (CIP 16.03)

Modified Courses
FR 350    Topics in French Film – omit cross-listing with FLM 350.
SPAN 406    Community-Based Work Experience – rename Community-Based Work; change credits to 1-15 credits; modify description.  Specify 30 hours of work per credit and other details about requirements.  Prerequisites include 6 courses of SPAN 310, 311, 312, 315, 322, 323, and 331.
SPAN 408    International Internship – specify full-time work, and 30 hours of work per credit.
SPAN 421/521    Selected Genre or Period Studies – change credits to 3-4 credits.
SPAN 422/522    Major Literary Figures – add to prereqs SPAN 301, 311, 312 or 412.
SPAN 425/525    Topics I Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Society – add to prereqs SPAN 301, 311, 312 or 412.
SPAN 482/582   Topics in Writing and Translation – add to prereqs SPAN 301, 412 (as alternative to 312), 315, and 322, 323.
SPAN 498    Capstone: Research and Writing – modify description and specify requirements.
SPAN 506    Advanced Spanish Conversation – renumber SPAN 510.

Suspended Courses
GL 413    Major Figures in German Literature
GL 415    Topics in German Film
GL 440    Germany 1845-1945: Germany’s Search for Unity
GL 441    Germany 1945-1990: From Division to Unity
GL 490    Research and Writing Capstone
SPAN 490    Capstone

Changes to Major
Omit BA in Arts and Letters, with options in French and Spanish

Requirements for the major:
•    Substantial revision and reorganization of requirements.
•    Omit tracks for French degree option.
•    Spanish Language and Culture degree option has Track A (International Internship) or Track B (Language, Literature, and Culture).
•    Track A:  60 credits in Spanish and related courses, and additional credits.
•    Track B:  72 credits in Spanish and related courses, and additional credits.
•    See revised Spanish option for details on changes.

Changes to minor
French minor: the minimum 8 credits taken on Ashland campus are upper division.

German minor:  
•    the minimum 8 credits taken on Ashland campus are upper division.
•    Add GL 203 to requirements
•    Omit list of elective choices, and replace with 8 approved credits from study abroad or the Deutsche Sommerschule am Pazifik

Spanish minor:
•    Add SPAN 441 to course choices, plus advisor-approved upper division courses in Spanish.

Changes to Graduate degree
Change Master of Arts and Letters to Master of Arts in Spanish Language Teaching


GEOGRAPHY

  (move geography section out of ES, and list alphabetically in academic section)

New Courses
GEOG 349     Maps, Cartography, and Geospatial Technology, 4 credits
Provides a fundamental understanding of map reading and interpretation, along with the principles and techniques used in the design and compilation of maps for effective cartographic communication. Provides an overview of the geospatial technologies of global positioning systems, remote sensing, and geographic information systems. Pre-requisite: proof of proficiency in computer skills. Cross-listed with ES 349.

GEOG 386     Environmental Data Analysis, 4 credits
Applies statistical principles and techniques to environmental data. Formulates questions appropriate to statistical analysis, statistical problem solving, data collection, and documentation with particular emphasis placed on using statistics as an effective communication and decision-making tool through computer-based analysis, figure and table production, and writing. Prerequisite: MTH 243. Cross-listed with ES 386.  Approved for University Studies (Integration).

GEOG 451/551     Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, 4 credits
Explores uses of computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for analyzing environmental features and feature-related data. Desktop GIS is employed for data storage, geographic data analysis, and map design. Covers applications in forestry, planning, resource management, and demography. Prerequisite: ES 349. Cross-listed with ES 451/551.

GEOG 453/553     Introduction to Remote Sensing, 4 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to remote sensing of the environment through digital image processing of satellite data. The goal is to develop an understanding of inventorying, mapping, and monitoring earth resources through the measurement, analysis and interpretation of electromagnetic energy emanating from features of interest. Prerequisite: ES 349. Cross-listed with ES/G 453/553.

GEOG 455/555     Introduction to Global Positioning Systems, 4 credits
Covers the fundamentals of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Includes an overview of the GPS system, its operation and major sources of error. Field and lab exercises allow for GPS data collection and application of various data processing techniques including differential correction, quality control, and export to geospatial software. Prerequisite: ES 349. ES 489/589 recommended. Cross-listed with ES/G 455/555.

Modified Courses
GEOG 360    Population, Development, and the Environment – rename Global Issues in Politics, Population, Development, and the Environment; cross-list as IS 360.
GEOG 386    Quantitative Methods in Geography –Environmental Data Analysis; cross-list with ES 386.
GEOG 437/537    Conservation in the United States – change cross-listing with SSC 437/537 to SSPC 437/537.
GEOG 439/539    Land Use Planning  - change cross-listing with SSC 439/539 to SSPC 439/539.
GEOG 492    Senior Capstone I – renumber GEOG 490; rename Field Geography Capstone I; change course sequence to GEOG 490, 491, 492.
GEOG 493    Senior Capstone II – renumber GEOG 491; rename Field Geography Capstone II; change prerequisite to GEOG 490.
GEOG 494/594    Senior Capstone III: Field Geography – renumber GEOG 492/592; rename Field Geography Capstone III; change prereqs to GEOG 490, 491.

Reinstate suspended course
GEOG 108    Global Lands and Livelihoods, 4 credits  (CIP 45.0701)
Provides a systematic geographic survey of human economic systems, regions and activities including population growth, resource extraction, transformation, transportation services, technological change, and control; urbanization and environmental impacts.  Provides a basis for understanding resources as cultural elements.  Introduces quantitative modeling of geographic systems and graphic display of quantitative data.  Explores the cultural relativity of legal and market control systems in regulated economies.  Provides fundamental insights into the growth and functions of cities.  Approved for University Studies (Explorations).

Deleted Courses
GEOG 280    Maps: Analysis and Interpretation
GEOG 340    Cartography
GEOG 487/587   Remote Sensing
GEOG 489/589  Geographic Information Systems

Changes to minors
Geography minor:   add GEOG/ES 349 as alternative to GEOG 280.

Land Use Planning minor: Substitute GEOG/ES 349 as alternative to GEOG 340.


GEOLOGY

New Courses
G 453/553     Introduction to Remote Sensing, 4 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to remote sensing of the environment through digital image processing of satellite data. The goal is to develop an understanding of inventorying, mapping, and monitoring earth resources through the measurement, analysis and interpretation of electromagnetic energy emanating from features of interest. Prerequisite: ES 349. Cross-listed with ES/GEOG 453/553.

G 455/555    Introduction to Global Positioning Systems, 4 credits
Covers the fundamentals of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Includes an overview of the GPS system, its operation and major sources of error. Field and lab exercises allow for GPS data collection and application of various data processing techniques including differential correction, quality control, and export to geospatial software. Prerequisite: ES 349, plus it is highly recommended that the student complete ES 489/589 first. Cross-listed with ES/GEOG 455/555.

Modified Courses
G 103    Historical Geology – approved for Explorations.
G 330    Metals and Civilization – approved for Synthesis/Integration.
G 353    Oceanography – remove cross-listing with SC 353; approved for Synthesis/Integration.
G 360    Environmental Geology – approved for Synthesis/Integration.
G 481/581    Geomorphology –  approved for Integration.

Deleted Courses
G 326        Global Positioning System (GPS)
G 487/587    Remote Sensing in Geology
G 489/589    Computer and Instrumental Methods


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Modified Courses
HE 275    Health and Society II – omit prerequisite of HE 250.

Changes to major
- Add Outdoor Adventure Leadership (OAL) concentration to  degree in Health and Physical Education (approved as new degree by Curriculum Committee and Faculty Senate in spring 2007; but approved as a concentration-only, and recommended as minor, by Provosts’ Council).

New Minor
- Add new minor in Outdoor Adventure Leadership
•    26 credits, including 12 upper division credits
•    Curriculum taken from 3 credits of PE 180; PE 194, 430; HE 252, 331; OAL 250, 275, 362, and 375.


HISTORY

New Courses
HST 344    The Nazi Party and the Third Reich, 4 credits (CIP 54.0101)
Examines the rise and fall of Adolph Hitler and the Nazi party between 1919 and 1945, and compares German fascism with similar movements around the World in the twentieth century.  Open to students of all majors.  Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.  HST 111 World History (or equivalent) recommended.

HST 370    World Biography & Autobiography, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Examines biography and autobiography as a "prism" to world history by linking individual lives with social/political conditions and cultural mentalities of societies to understand western and non-western world views and cultural practices.  It assesses the ways biography as a genre can serve as a vital form of history.  It explores historical writing by examining innovations in biography, such as collective biography and prosopography, which place it at the forefront of new historical methodology.  This course is open to all majors.  Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.

HST 371    Twentieth Century Revolutions, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Assesses historical developments, individuals, and transformations of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the prism of revolutions and revolutionary movements.  Focus upon revolutions in Mexico (1910-40), Russia (1905-28), China (1911-58), and Cuba (1933-70).  A thematic and comparative approach to the study of modern global history. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and completion of Explorations sequences in Humanities and Social Sciences. HST 111 World History or PS 110 (or equivalent) recommended. (Cross listed with PS 371).

HST 380    War in the Modern World, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Seeks to explore and examine the modern history of one of the most common of all human social experiences: war.  Themes to be explored include war and its connection with human aggression, the emotional and psychological experience of war, the professionalization of war, and the role of public opinion, technology, and medical advance in war.  Finally the course will examine peace movements and other concerted attempts to eliminate war from human history.  Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HST 381    Nazi Germany and Film, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Uses film to approach Nazi Germany to examine relationships between "reality" and "representation" and promote the reconceptualization of the boundaries between history and film.  It demonstrates how the economic, social, and political conditions of the Nazi era affected the cultural values and beliefs of the German people and the historical interpretations of them and their government.  This course is open to all majors.  Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Humanities and Social Sciences Explorations courses.  

HST 382    Vietnam War and Film, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Focuses on the impact of popular American motion pictures and major documentaries of the Vietnam War on American history and culture thirty years after the end of the conflict.  The goal is to promote critical thinking about the Vietnam War in order to understand how historical, economic, social, and political conditions affected American cultural values and beliefs. This course is open to all majors.  Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Humanities and Social Sciences Explorations courses. (Cross listed with PS 382).

HST 388    The Constitution and the Supreme Court, 4 credits
Analyzes the Supreme Court as a political and legal institution.  Examines the relationship between the Supreme Court and other courts, as well as other branches of government.  Includes an examination of recent decisions of the Supreme Court interpreting the Constitution.  (Cross-listed with PS 341).

HST 389    The Constitution and the Presidency, 4 credits  (CIP 45.1001)
Beginning with the Constitutional Convention of 1787, this course examines political and legal disputes involving presidential powers or prerogatives, and charts the development of and changes to the presidency within the American political and constitutional system. Cross-listed with PS 343.

HST 448    Imperial Russia, 4 credits (CIP 54.0101)
Provides in depth examination of Russia from the time of Peter the Great in 1682 to the end of Czarist Russia in World War I and the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Major themes include Westernization and expansion under Peter and Catherine the Great as well as Alexander I and the Napoleonic Wars.  Analysis given to relations with Britain or the "Eastern Question" and the Crimean War, abolition of serfdom, industrialization and failure to reform at the time of the Russo-Japanese War, as well as rising nationalism on the eve of World War I, revolution and collapse of the Romanov Dynasty. Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Recommended: HST 110 and 111 and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities explorations courses.

HST 450    Spain since 1808, 4 credits (CIP 54.0101)
Examines the economic, social, political, and cultural history of Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It begins with the French invasion and covering such topics as the Isabeline regime and the consolidation of Spanish liberalism and constitutionalism, the Civil War, the Franco era, and ends with the most recent democratic period.  Investigates how Spanish history reflects the broader framework of the European experience by examining the problems of industrialization, modernity, mass political mobilization, and the post-World War II transformation of European society.  Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and completion of Explorations requirements in Humanities and Social Sciences. HST 111 World History (or equivalent) recommended.  

HST 454    US-Latin American Relations, 4 credits  (54.0101)
This course examines the history of relations between Latin American nations and the United States, focusing on the last half of the twentieth century.  Considerable attention will be given to the impact of Latin America's nationalist, anti-imperialist, class, racial, and economic struggles on foreign relations, while recognizing that there are asymmetrical hegemonic relationships between the United States and other nations in the hemisphere.  American policies are analyzed in terms of the domestic and global contexts within which leaders defined national economic, strategic, and ideological interests and their regional policy objectives. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social sciences and Humanities Explorations courses. Recommended: HST 251 or HST 111 or PS 110 or equivalents.  (Cross listed with PS 454).

HST 459    Rise of Industrial America, 4 credits (CIP 54.0101)
Covers political, economic, and social history from the end of Reconstruction (1877) to 1920.  Emphasizes industrialization, labor movements, agrarian problems, populism, and the emergence of the United States as an urban nation and world power. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.  HST 251 recommended.

HST 472    World War I, 4 credits   (CIP 54.0101)
This course seeks to explore and examine the history of the first of two "world Wars" in the twentieth century.  Themes to be addressed include European competition and tensions that led to war, the role of modern technology on the scale and severity of the war, the mass mobilization of the civilian economy in this first of the "total wars," and attempts to end the war through diplomatic means.  Additionally, the impact of the "Great War" on future developments in Europe and around the world will be addressed as well.  Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.  HST 111 World Civilizations (or equivalent) recommended.

HST 476    American West, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Exploration into the history of the Trans-Mississippi West. Themes examined include ancient and Native civilizations, the Spanish empire, westward expansion of Anglo Americans, construction of railroads, irrigation development, and industrialization in the twentieth century. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing. HST 250 and 251 or equivalents recommended.  

HST 481, 482   Twentieth Century United States, 4 credits each  (CIP 54.0101)
An advanced examination of the "American century." HST 481: American involvement in the First World War, the boom and bust of the 1920s, the New Deal, World War II, and the early years of the atomic era. HST 482: the Eisenhower presidency, the 1960s, Nixon and Watergate, the "malaise" of the 1970s, and the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s and early 1990s, and the Clinton presidency to century's end.  Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, HST 251 or equivalents recommended.

Modified Courses
HST 110, 111, 112    World Civilizations – omit HST 112; modify description; 110 to 1500 C.E.; 111 since 1500 C.E.
HST 250, 251    American History and Life – minor description change.
HST 304, 305, 306    English History - omit HST 304 and content; minor description changes.  Change prerequisites to upper division standing; recommended: HST 110 and 111 and completion of Social Science and Humanities Explorations courses.
HST 350, 351, 352   History of Latin America – for HST 351, change focus to modern economic, social, political, and cultural history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.  HST 352 focus changes to focus on modern history of South America.  Recommended:  HST 111 and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.
HST 361, 362, 363   History of Africa – change prerequisites for all three to upper division standing.  Add recommended courses:  for HST 361, HST 110; for HST 362 and 363, HST 111 and completion of Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.  
HST 421/521    World Environmental History - rename Environmental History; minor description change; add prereq of upper division standing.  
HST 431, 432, 433    Islamic Middle East – omit cross-listing with PS 450.
HST 451, 452, 453   American Foreign Relations – add recommended courses HST 250, 251, or PS 110 or equivalents and completion of social sciences and arts and letters explorations courses (HST 453 cross-listed with PS 450).
HST 455    Colonial America – change prereqs to upper division standing.
HST 456    American Revolution, 1763-1800 – change prereqs to upper division standing.
HST 457    From Jefferson to the Jacksonians – rename Antebellum America; modify description to emphasize the development of democracy, westward expansion, and divergence of north and south; change prereqs to upper-division standing.
HST 458    Civil War and Reconstruction – expand description to include Reconstruction and changes brought about by the war; change prereqs to upper division standing.
HST 465    Modern Mexico – modify description and change focus to an overview of economic, social, political, and cultural history, and outline basic theoretical models for analyzing historical trends.  Change prereqs to upper division standing and completion of Explorations requirements in Humanities and Social Sciences; HST 111 or PS 110 recommended.
HST 484/584    Topics in American History – omit listing of topic examples.
HST 495    China: 1279 to 1900 – renumber HST 395; omit prerequisites; change recommended courses to HST 110, 111, and Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.
HST 496    China: Twentieth Century – renumber HST 396; omit prerequisites; change recommended courses to HST 110, 111, and Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.
HST 497, 498    Japan – suspend HST 497; renumber HST 498 to HST 397 and rename Japan since 1800.  Modify description to cover Japan since 1800; omit prerequisites but recommend HST 110, 111, and Social Sciences and Humanities Explorations courses.

Suspended courses
HST 112    World Civilizations (retain HST 110, 111)
HST 304    English History (retain HST 305, 306)
HST 315    Ancient Greece
HST 316    Ancient Rome
HST 317    Europe in the Middle Ages, AD 500-1300
HST 318    European Renaissance and Reformation, 1300-1600
HST 319    European Old Regime and the Enlightenment, 1600-1800
HST 383    Native American History
HST 391    East Asian Thought
HST 392    Modern East Asia
HST 464    Colonial Mexico
HST 494    China: Prehistory through 1279
HST 497    Japan (renumber HST 498 to HST 397)

Changes to major
Requirements for the major:
•    Completely revise section and requirements
•    Complete HST 110, 111, 250, 251, 415 (20 credits)
•    Complete three U.S. history courses (12 credits) chosen from list of 15 courses, plus possible open-numbered courses if appropriate
•    Complete two courses chosen from three of four categories (24 credits); course categories are (a) Transnational, Comparative, and International History, (b) European History, (c) African or Middle Eastern History, and (d) Asian or Latin American History.
•    Complete three additional upper-division History electives (12 credits)

Changes to minor
•    Eliminate minors in African and Middle Eastern History, European History, Latin American History, and United States History.
•    Introduce new minor in History:  28 credits.  Choose 4 credits each from Transnational, Comparative, and International History; European History; U.S. History: African or Middle Eastern History; and Asian or Latin American History; and two additional electives (8 cr) in any two of the areas.


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

New Course
IS 360       Global Issues in Politics Population, Development, and the Environment, 4 credits
Examines contemporary global issues and investigates the roles played by cultural values, technologies, infrastructure, and sociopolitical organizations as intermediaries between human population growth, poverty, and environmental degradation. Provides the conceptual tools to formulate questions about how human societies choose to invest wealth in population growth, consumption, economic growth, or environmental preservation. Term projects require students to identify a significant and specific case relating population growth to economic development and environmental degradation and to recommend action goals. Prerequisite: Completion of all lower division University Studies requirements.  Approved for University Studies (Synthesis/Integration). (Cross-list with GEOG/ES 360.)

Modified Courses
IS 250        International Scene – approved for Explorations.

Changes to major
Core courses
•    add ANTH 213 as alternative course to IS 250
•    Add IS/GEOG 360 as alternative to IS 350
Language:
•    entering IS majors whose native language is English must meet with a Foreign Language and Literatures advisor to plan their foreign language curriculum.
International Political Economy:  
•    For COMM 460 courses, topics must be pre-approved.
•    Add to course choices:  HST 371, 380, 472.
Regional and Country Studies:
•    Omit these courses from choices:  GL 440, 441; GEOG 326; HST 391, 392.
•    Update course numbers/titles for HST 496, 498.
•    Add to course choices: HST 384, 444, 448, 450, 454.

Changes to minor
International Studies minor:  
•    In required courses, add ANTH 213 as alternate course to IS 250; add IS/GEOG 360 as alternative to IS 350.
•    In electives, revise wording to clarify requirements.

Latin American Studies minor:  
•    For Latin American history requirements, students take 8 credits from HST 465, 545, 485, 350, 351, 352.
•    add IS/GEOG 360 as alternative to IS 350.


MATHEMATICS

- Mathematics Honors Program – either a second MTH 431 topic or a MTH 421 topic (beyond what is required for the major) is required.


NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

(certificate and minor)

Change to minor/certificate
- Omit HST 383 (Native American History) from course choices.


PHILOSOPHY

Modified Courses
PHL 326    Indian Ethics: The River of Dharma – shorten title to Indian Ethics
PHL 330    Science and Values: A Critical Appraisal of How Science and Values Interact – rename Science, Democracy, and Citizenship.

Changes to minor
Ethics minor: in philosophy electives, delete HO 407 from Issues in Bioethics (PHL 420).


PHYSICS

New Courses
PH 174    Digital Systems and Robotics, 3 credits (CIP 14.1001)
Introduces the basics of digital electronics and the fundamentals of robotics.  Topics include simple logic, truth tables, logic gates, voltage, currents, power, TTL chips, sensors, servos, and some practical applications.  Cross-listed with ENGR 174.

PH 176    The Science and Technology of Materials, 3 credits (CIP 14.3101)
Introduces basic concepts of materials science and the microstructure-property relationships in various classes of materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and semiconductors.
Topics include fundamentals of characterization techniques and application to science and technology.  Approved for University Studies (Explorations).  Cross-listed with ENGR 176.

Modified Courses
PH 312    Space, Time, and the Cosmos – change prereqs to u.d. standing and completion of all l.d. University Studies requirements.
PH 313    Acoustics, Sound, and Music – change prereqs to u.d. standing and completion of all l.d. University Studies requirements.
PH 434/534    Advanced Physics Laboratory – add materials characterization techniques to description; decrease maximum credits from 6 credits to 3 credits; add ENGR 226 as prereq option.

Suspended Courses
PH 512    Environmental Measurements

Changes to Major
Degrees:  BA/BS is only available for Standard Physics Option; BS is available for other options.
Core Requirements:  change “physics majors” to “physics options”
Additional Requirements:  
    Standard Option: revise format of listing requirements
    Applied Physics Option: omit ENGR 439
    Materials Science Option: add PH 434 to requirements

Changes to the Minor
Requirements for the Minor:
•    Update credits from 54 credits to 56 credits
•    Update upper division credits from 13 credits to 15 credits, by adding PH 344 (Modern Physics Laboratory) to requirements.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

New Courses
PS 343        The Constitution and the Presidency, 4 credits  (CIP 45.1001)
Beginning with the Constitutional Convention of 1787, this course examines political and legal disputes involving presidential powers or prerogatives, and charts the development of and changes to the presidency within the American political and constitutional system.  Cross-listed with HST 389.

PS 355        Global Politics, 4 credits  (CIP 45.1001)
This course examines the institutional transformations of global politics over the past half century.  Through a combination of theory-based analyses of regional and international politics (alliances, non-governmental organizations, nation-states, international law, hegemony) and comparative case studies of regime types around the world, the student will acquire a more comprehensive understanding of the global political landscape.  Upper division standing recommended.

PS 371        Twentieth Century Revolutions, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Assesses historical developments, individuals, and transformations of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the prism of revolutions and revolutionary movements.  Focus upon revolutions in Mexico (1910-40), Russia (1905-28), China (1911-58), and Cuba (1933-70).  A thematic and comparative approach to the study of modern global history. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and completion of Explorations sequences in Humanities and Social Sciences. HST 111 or 112 World History or PS 110 (or equivalent) recommended. (Cross listed with HST 371).

PS 382        Vietnam War and Film, 4 credits  (CIP 54.0101)
Focuses on the impact of popular American motion pictures and major documentaries of the Vietnam War on American history and culture thirty years after the end of the conflict.  The goal is to promote critical thinking about the Vietnam War in order to understand how historical, economic, social, and political conditions affected American cultural values and beliefs. This course is open to all majors.  Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Humanities and Social Sciences Explorations courses. (Cross listed with HST 382).

PS 448/548    Mediation and Conflict Management, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course. Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed in other departments.

PS 454        US-Latin American Relations, 4 credits  (54.0101)
This course examines the history of relations between Latin American nations and the United States, focusing on the last half of the twentieth century.  Considerable attention will be given to the impact of Latin America's nationalist, anti-imperialist, class, racial, and economic struggles on foreign relations, while recognizing that there are asymmetrical hegemonic relationships between the United States and other nations in the hemisphere.  American policies are analyzed in terms of the domestic and global contexts within which leaders defined national economic, strategic, and ideological interests and their regional policy objectives. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of Social sciences and Humanities Explorations courses. Recommended: HST 251 or HST 111 or PS 110 or equivalents.  (Cross listed with HST 454).

PS 458        Terrorism, 4 credits   (CIP 45.1001)
This upper-division seminar focuses on the causes, methods, and consequences of internal and international terrorism.  Both theoretical analyses and specific case studies are examined in an attempt to make sense of the historical development and current trajectories of terrorism, both within a society and as a regional or global phenomenon.  Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. PS 110, 355, or HST 111 recommended.

Modified Courses
PS 341        The Constitution and the Supreme Court – cross-list with HST 388.

Changes to major
•    Core courses: Omit PS 313 and the 24 additional credits.
•    Students choose between two tracks:

Track #1 Politics, Law, and Strategic Studies (32 credits)

Choose two courses (8 credits) from each of these three subfields:
•    American Politics and Processes (8 credits): choose from PS 310, 311, 313, 360, 428, and topic-related courses from 399, 401, 403, 407, 409, and 469.
•    Public Law (8 credits): choose from PS 340, 341, 343, 441, and topic-related courses from 399, 401, 403, 407, 409, and 469.
•    Global and Strategic Studies (8 credits): choose from PS 355, 371, 450, 454, 458, and topic-related courses from 399, 401, 403, 407, 409, and 469.

Choose one course from these Community-Based Learning courses: PS 311, 321, 324, 417, 430A/430B (4 credits)

One additional upper division political science course (4 credits)

Track #2  Community Organizing (32 credits)
Students complete the following courses:  PS 311, 313, 321, 324, 409, 417, 428, 430A, 430B.


PSYCHOLOGY

New Course
PSY 448/548    Mediation and Conflict Management, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course.  Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed in other departments.

PSY 473    Introduction to Art Therapy, 4 credits  (CIP 42.0601)
Designed as an introduction to the discipline of art therapy.  It includes experiential work both in and outside of class as well as lecture, reading, writing, and exams.  This course will introduce the student to definitions and theories of art therapy, developmental art and psychology, experience with the image, and a few special populations with which art therapists work.  Prerequisite:  PSY 202; PSY 201 recommended.

Modified Courses
PSY 317    Personal and Social Adjustment – PSY 202 strongly recommended.
PSY 334    Social Psychology I– rename Social Psychology; modify description; PSY 202 recommended.
PSY 341    Learning and Memory – add PSY 201 prerequisite.
PSY 351    Physiological Psychology – rename Behavioral Neuroscience – minor description change; change prerequisites to PSY 201, and BI 101 or 211.
PSY 353    Sensation and Perception – add prerequisites: successful completion of lower division writing requirements.
PSY 414/514    Humanistic Psychology – add PSY 202 as recommended course.
PSY 416    Teaching Psychology – rename Teaching Assistantship.
PSY 431/531    Community Psychology – omit PSY 431 component and offer only as PSY 531; add prerequisite of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 438    Group Dynamics – add PSY 538 component (PSY 438/538); change prerequisites to PSY 202 and COMM 125.
PSY 444/544    Cognitive Processes – add prerequisite: Successful completion of lower division writing requirements.
PSY 446    Industrial/Organizational Psychology – add PSY 546 component (PSY 446/546); change prerequisites to PSY 201 and 229 (omit PSY 327 prereq).
PSY 452/552    Health Psychology – add prerequisites: PSY 201 and 202; PSY 228 and 229 recommended.
PSY 457 557    Drug Use and Abuse – add perquisite PSY 201.
PSY 502    The Helping Relationship – change “track” to “program.”
PSY 504    Individual Counseling Practicum – change “track” to “program.”
PSY 506    Group Counseling Practicum – change “track” to “program.”
PSY 509    Practicum – in description, omit description of requirements for OTD.
PSY 510    Internship – change “track” to “program.”
PSY 516    Teaching Psychology – rename Teaching Assistantship; omit corequisites.
PSY 521    Assessment – add prerequisite of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 533    Personality and Organizational Behavior – create PSY 433 component (PSY 433/533) and rename personality Testing and Organizational Assessment; omit MAP enrollment prerequisite and replace with PSY 229 prereq.
PSY 539    Group Facilitation and Assessment – create PSY 439 component (PSY 439/539).  Change prerequisites to PSY 201, 202, and 438/538.
PSY 542    Applied Research Design – add prereq of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 549    Occupational Choice and the Psychology of Careers – change “track” to “program”; add prerequisite of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 569    Psychology of Human Sexuality – change prereq to enrollment in MHC program.
PSY 571    Counseling Theory – add to prereqs enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 572    Mental Health Counselor: Identity and Practice – add prereq of enrollment in MHC program.
PSY 573    Mental Health Profession – Change prereq of “enrollment in the HS or MHC track” to “enrollment in the MHC program.”
PSY 574    Group Counseling – modify student participation section of course description; change prerequisites to enrollment n the MHC program.
PSY 575    Advanced Crisis Intervention Strategies – add prereq of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 576    Family and Marriage Counseling – rename Family and Couples Counseling; add prereq     of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 577    Counseling Children – omit prerequisites.
PSY 581    Ethics and Roles in the Helping Profession – rename Ethics and Roles in the Counseling Profession; change MAP prerequisite to MHC.
PSY 583    Advanced Psychopathology – add enrollment in the MHC program to prereqs.
PSY 585    Treatment Planning and Consultation – change from 2 credits to 1 credit; add prereq of enrollment in the MHC program.
PSY 586    Multicultural Mental Health – add prereq of enrollment in MHC program.
PSY 599    Professional Guidance – change credits to 1-4 credits; change enrollment in MAP program to MHC program.

Suspended Courses
PSY 335    Social Psychology II
PSY 431    Community Psychology [retain PSY 531 component]

Deleted Courses
PSY 511    Orientation to the MAP

Changes to Major
•    Degrees: suspend Organizational Training and Development (OTD) and Human Service (HS) Tracks for MAP; retain Mental Health Counseling as MA/MS in Mental Healtb Counseling.
•    Requirements for the Major: in #2, add BI 211 as alternative for BI 101; in #3a, omit senior standing requirement; in #3b, all psychology core/required classes, excpt PSY 201 and 202 and the multicultural list, must be taken as A-F grade only; in #4, add BI 211 as alternative to BI 101
•    For 6-credit maximum of practicum courses, omit human service.
•    Human Service Degree Completion Program; change School of Social Science to Sociology program.
•    Substantial changes to MAP; omit MAP and change to MA/MS in Mental Health Counseling (MHC); these changes will be reviewed by Graduate Council.


SOCIAL SCIENCES, POLICY, AND CULTURE

(create new SSPC catalog section and prefix)

New Courses

SSPC 199    Special Studies, credits to be arranged (maximum 16 credits)
SSPC 399    Special Studies, credits to be arranged (maximum 16 credits)
SSPC 405/505    Reading and Conference, credits to be arranged (maximum 16 credits)
SSPC 407/507        Seminar, credits to be arranged (maximum 16 credits)
SSPC 409/509        Practicum, credits to be arranged (maximum 16 credits)
SSPC 437/537        Conservation in the United States (cross-listed as GEOG 437/537)
SSPC 439/539        Land Use Planning (cross-listed as GEOG 439/539)


SOCIOLOGY

(separate Anthropology from Sociology)
Add new statement about sociology major.


THEATRE ARTS

New Courses
TA 169    Elements of Design, 3 credits
Required for all freshman and transfer theatre Pre-majors. Elements of Design serves as an introduction to the process and principles of design with particular attention to the practice of designers working in the performing arts.  It is the prerequisite to all upper division theatre design courses. Through lectures, readings, classroom activities, and projects the class will explore the design process from text analysis through design development. Students will become comfortable with image manipulations, interpretation, and will gain communication tools vital for working in a collaborative environment.

TA 430    The Art of Storytelling, 3 credits
Folk tales, literary tales, family and personal stories are used to explore the ancient art of storytelling during this course.  The focus is on observing different storytellers, experimenting with a variety of storytelling techniques, and developing a personal storytelling style.  Students learn to select and adapt stories for telling and deliver them with their own unique flair. The course also covers audience-participation storytelling, story games, story-theater, and developing family stories.  Teachers K-12 will learn to use storytelling in the classroom throughout the curriculum.  Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed with ED 430.

TA 457    Topics in World Drama, 4 credits (maximum 12 credits)
This course examines forms of theatre and plays outside the Western canon and how they intersect with or have influenced Western forms. Topics include exploration of the ancient Japanese forms of Kabuki and Noh Theatre as well as East Indian theatre such as The Mahabharata.  Titles from China and Africa are also included.  Repeat credit is allowed for different topics.

Modified Courses
TA 166    Theatre Foundations – minor description change.
TA 167    Scripts Analysis – minor description change.
TA 210    Movement for the Actor I – minor descriptions change; change prerequisites to TA 247 or instructor consent.
TA 211    Movement for the Actor II – change prereq to TA 210 or instructor consent.
TA 224    Voice and Speech for the Stage I – change prereq to TA 247 or instructor consent.
TA 225    Voice and Speech for the Stage II – change prereq to TA 224, 248, or instructor consent.
TA 248    Acting II: Intermediate Acting – omit instructor consent by application.
TA 252    Stage Makeup – add prereq of TA 146 or permission of instructor.
TA 262, 263, 264   Costume Design – minor description changes; prereqs are TA 146 or permission of instructor.
TA 266, 267, 268   Costume Construction – minor description changes; prereqs are TA 146 or permission of instructor.
TA 312    Movement for the Actor III – in prereqs, instructor consent is an alternative, not requirement.
TA 326    Voice and Speech for the Stage III – add permission of instructor as prereq alternative.
TA 346    Costume Crafts – add permission of instructor as prereq alternative.
TA 348    Acting III: Advanced Acting – omit instructor consent by application; add instructor consent to prerequisites.
TA 350    Auditioning I – add permission of instructor to prerequisites.
TA 351    Auditioning II – add permission of instructor to prerequisites.
TA 360    Creative Dramatics – add permission of instructor as alternative prereq.
TA 366, 367    Advanced Costume Construction – minor description change.
TA 526, 527, 528   Design Elements – minor description change.
TA 541, 542, 543   Practicum Applied Technology – minor description change.

Changes to major
•    Applications from transfer students are considered during winter term.  Freshmen applications are considered during spring term.

Requirements for the major:
•    In #3c, omit TA 168 and replace with TA 169.
•    BA/BS degree:  omit TA 168 and replace with TA 169.
•    BFA degree:  omit TA 168 and replace with TA 169.

Changes to the minor
Omit TA 168 and replace with TA 169

Master of Theatre Studies in Production and Design
 - minor rewording; changes will be reviewed by the Graduate Council.

Note: for the prerequisite note preceding the listing of upper division courses, the exceptions to the prerequisite requirement are expanded and will include TA 357, 358, 455, 457, and 458.

Deleted Courses
TA 168    Playreading


WOMEN’S STUDIES

New Courses
WS 410    Feminist Theory in Action, 4 credits (CIP 05.02)
Examines relationship between feminist theory and related action, application or activism.  In addition to class attendance and participation, all students will be required to engage in 30 hours in projects or placements; these may include service learning, community-based learning, or independently devised individual or group projects involving social and cultural action.  In-class time will be divided between analyses of diverse feminist theories and collective discussion of student projects.   Required of Women’s Studies minors and Independent Interdisciplinary Majors whose primary field is Women’s Studies.  Course is also open to all students with junior or senior standing.  Prerequisites:  Upper division standing and consent of instructor. WS 201 highly recommended.

Modified Course
WS 302    Contemporary U.S. Women’s Movements – approved for Integration.

Suspended Course
WS 409    Practicum

Changes to minor
•    Replace WS 401 and/or WS 409 requirement with WS 410.
•    Add to electives list:  COMM 460 Gender Politics, and Media), ENG 447 (England’s Others: Victorian Literature of Immigration and Empire), SOC 407 (Feminist Social Thought)
•    Omit from electives:  WS 399 (Sex, Gender, Violence and Justice), WS 418.
•    For 16 credits of u.d. electives, no more than 3 courses can have the same prefix.


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

New Courses
BA 300     Management of Aging Services Overview, 4 credits
Provides an overview of the business aspects of the Aging Services industry (development,
marketing, construction, operations, human resources, legal, and financial management).  
Explores management of various industry segments (CCRC, Independent, Assisted/Residential Living, Skilled Nursing, Memory/Dementia Care, Home Health, HUD/Affordable Housing, etc.) and the broad range of services they provide.

BA 306     Special Topics in Management of Aging Services, 2 credits
Addresses various Aging Services topics in a seminar setting.  Possible topics include (but are not limited to): Operational Challenges; Customer Service; Financial Performance; Technological Advances; Alternative Approaches, and Research.  Course may be repeated for credit on a different topic. Prerequisite:  permission of program coordinator.

BA 400/500     Organizational Management of Aging Services, 2 credits
Covers the organizational management techniques specific to Aging Services.  Explores the needs and demands of the senior population in regards to regulations, ethics, quality and delivery of services for each industry segment and level of care.  Case studies focus on the needs of seniors with limited health, poor cognitive function, and low income.  Prerequisites: BA 300 and 374 or permission of instructor.

BA 406/506 Management of Aging Services Operations, 2 credits
Provides an in-depth study of operations management for the Aging Services industry.  Areas of study include: budget and financial management; dining and dietary services; resident and pastoral services; facility and environmental management; health services; wellness recreation; and marketing. Prerequisite:  BA 300 and BA 380 or permission of instructor.

BA 420/520    Trends and Research in Aging Services, 2 credits
Explores specialized or emerging trends and innovative services and technologies that have
or will substantially alter the management and service provided to the aging population.  
Prerequisite: BA 374.

BA 422/522     Financial Management of Aging Services, 2 credits
Provides an overview of financial management and accounting within the Aging Services industry.  Explores the various financing services available to seniors (public resources, private payment and insurance) as well as financial and operational performance ratios, budget planning, capital planning, projections, and how each affects the overall Aging Services operation.  Prerequisite: BA 385.

BA 424/524     Marketing of Aging Services, 2 credits
Provides an overview of marketing research, developments and strategies related to Aging
Services customers.  Students understand how to identify the market needs and demands of products and services available in the industry and gain an understanding of different market demographics and how to correlate product, services and price to each specific target market.  Prerequisite:  BA 330.

BA 426/526     Development and Construction of Aging Services, 2 credits
Provides an overview of how identified needs are translated into products and services.  Students
understand the steps required to develop and construct various kinds of long-term care facilities or programs.  Attention is given to the development tasks to be performed throughout the life of a project and how they relate to construction tasks including, but not limited to, design plans, permits, and financing.  Prerequisite:  BA 374.

BA 448/548    Mediation and Conflict Management, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course. Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed in other departments.

Modified Courses
BA 211, 213    Accounting Information I, II – 4 credits each.
BA 351, 352, 353    Financial Reporting and Analysis I, II, III – rename Intermediate Accounting I, II, III.
BA 365    Introduction to Taxation – renumber BA 453/553.
BA 370    Business Law – renumber BA 226.
BA 409/509    Practicum – requires a 2.5 cumulative GPA or above in Business Administration courses.
BA 412    Hospitality and Law – rename Hospitality Law and Management.
BA 427    Business Policy and Strategy – omit BA 370 prerequisite.
BA 428    Applied Business Research – omit all prerequisites.
BA 430A       Nonprofit Organization Management – create 530A component, and rename Nonprofit Grant Writing and Government Relations; rewrite description to emphasize assessing and evaluating grant based programs; eliminate prerequisites.
BA 430B    Nonprofit Organization Management – create 530B component, and rename Nonprofit Volunteerism, Board Development and Community Mobilization; reword description; eliminate prerequisites.
BA 446/546    Retail Management – eliminate BA 331 prerequisite.
BA 457    Advanced Taxation – add BA 557 component.
BA 465A    CPA Review: Financial and Auditing – add BA 565A component.
BA 465B    CPA Review:  Business and Regulation – add BA 565B component; update prerequisites to BA 226, 451, 453, 454.
BA 468    Principles of Fundraising – create 568 component; rename Principles of Marketing, Public Relations and Fundraising; decrease from 4 credits to 2 credits; modify description, emphasize importance of an agency’s overall connection with the community; fieldwork component is omitted.
BA 470    Financial Markets and Institutions – add BA 570 component.
BA 478/578    Corporate Law – change BA 370 prerequisite to BA 226.
BA 480/580    Introduction to Nonprofit Theory and Management – rename Nonprofit Theory and Leadership; regional nonprofit leaders will participate as class speakers.
BA 499    Business Planning – omit BA 370 prerequisite.

New option in major
Management of Aging Services (26 credits)
•    One new 4-credit course, plus seven 2-credit courses, plus PSY 466 (Psychology of Aging) and PSY 467 (Death and Dying).

Changes to major
Requirements for admission to School of Business: add BA 226 (Business Law) to lower division business course courses.

Requirements for the Major:  
•    In #2, omit Business Law course [added to admission requirements as BA 226]
•    In #3, change 24-40 credits to “at least 24 credits;” add management of aging services to list of options.
•    Beginning with #4, reorder and condense requirements #4-9 to# 4-8.  The former #4 is revised as “Additional Requirements.”

Options:
Update five options to six options.
Accounting:
•    Update course titles for BA 351, 352, 353, and course number for Introduction to Taxation.

Management:
•    Update course titles for BA 430A, 430B, and 480.

Small Business Management:
•    Update course number for Introduction to Taxation to BA 453
•    Update course title for BA 412

Hospitality and Tourism Management:
•    Update course title for BA 412.

Other changes to major:
Second year suggested curriculum: add 4 credits of business law, and decrease minor courses from 16 credits to 12 credits.

Liberal Arts Enrichment Program:
•    Discontinue the Environmental Enrichment Area
•    In Cultural Diversity Enrichment Area, omit HST 383 (Native American History)
•    International Perspective Enrichment Area, omit GEOG 103 from requirements and decrease required courses to 8 credits; increase electives to 16 credits.

International Dual Degrees
Hochschule Harz
HTW Saarlandes

(Students in these programs earn both a business degree from SOU and a degree from one of our partner universities in Germany.  The program can be completed in four years, with a year of study at one of the German universities during a student’s Junior or Senior year.)

Changes to certificates
•    Minor revisions to text of short descriptions of business certificate programs
•    Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Nonprofit Management – omit “Postbaccalaureate”


BUSINESS-CHEMISTRY

•    Update course number for Business Law to BA 226


BUSINESS-MATHEMATICS

•    Update course number for Business Law to BA 226.


BUSINESS-PHYSICS

•    Update course number for Business Law to BA 226.


MUSIC-BUSINESS

•    Update course number for Business Law to BA 226.



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

New Course
ED 426/526    Bullies & Victims in the Schools: Intervention/Prevention, 3 credits (CIP 13.1005)
Designed to provide understanding of the bully/victim syndrome, policy guidelines, and strategies and methods to intervene and curb bullying in the schools, this course will address and provide teachers with a system of preventing and dealing with bullying abuse in the schools. We will examine the identified types of bullying and their manifestations. The applicable state and federal laws will be examined.  

ED 427/527    Child Abuse and Neglect, 3 credits (CIP 13.1005)
Designed to give participants a foundation the subjects of Child Abuse and Neglect.  Contents include material to create an awareness of child abuse and neglect and how to recognize the signs of abuse and neglect in students, and ways to respond, including awareness of and requirements of the law.   Students will examine society's role that allows abuse and neglect to occur, the types of abuse and neglect children encounter, preventative measures a teacher can utilize, incidence in diverse populations, the role of the school, mandated reporting, working with parents and social service agencies, and the role of court appointed special advocates.

ED 430    The Art of Storytelling, 3 credits
Folk tales, literary tales, family and personal stories are used to explore the ancient art of storytelling during this course.  The focus is on observing different storytellers, experimenting with a variety of storytelling techniques, and developing a personal storytelling style.  Students learn to select and adapt stories for telling and deliver them with their own unique flair. The course also covers audience-participation storytelling, story games, story-theater, and developing family stories.  Teachers K-12 will learn to use storytelling in the classroom throughout the curriculum.  Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed with TA 430.

ED 450/550    Mediation and Conflict, 4 credits
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of dispute resolution and assists them in developing the basic skills and knowledge for productively managing their own and intervening in others’ disputes.  Class time consists primarily of practice and role play as well as lecture, lecture-discussion and coaching by professional mediators.  Certificate of completion provided with successful completion of the course.  Additional fees/tuition may apply.  Cross-listed in other departments.

ED 529    Talented and Gifted Education, 3 credits (CIP 13.1004)
This foundations course is designed to give individuals the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a planned program that will meet the needs of academically talented and intellectually gifted students within a framework of Oregon's state requirements. Students will gain an understanding of the characteristics and needs of TAG students, current legislation as it relates to the education of talented and gifted children, identification procedures, assessment options, programs and services models, and curriculum differentiation options.

LEAD 505     CAL Reading and Conference on Leadership and Organizations (1-4 credits)
This Reading and Conference focuses on issues of organizational leadership in the schools and community.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of organizational issues, legal aspects, and leadership at the building and district levels.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, Practicum Mentor, Instructor of record, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU Reading and Conference.

LEAD 505     CAL Reading and Conference on Culture and Diversity (1-4 credits)
Issues of culture and diversity in the schools and the larger community provide the focus for this reading and conference.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of cultural and legal issues and leadership.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, mentor, instructor, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

LEAD 505     CAL Reading and Conference on Evaluation & Assessment (1-4 credits)
This Reading and Conference focuses on issues of evaluation and assessment in the schools and community.  Students will work with their Mentor, CAL Coordinator, and Instructor of record to develop an independent study to strengthen the CAL candidate’s theoretical understanding of evaluation and assessment issues and legal requirements at the building and district levels.  Readings and assignments for this Independent Study will be determined collaboratively depending upon the agreement among the student, Practicum Mentor, Instructor of record, and CAL Coordinator. This seminar may also be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

LEAD520     Administrative Portfolio (1 credit)
An independent study course that supports the development of a professional portfolio for candidates who are completing their administrative license at either the Initial or Continuing levels. The purpose of the professional portfolio is to show evidence of meeting Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) requirements for the administrative licensure, Standard 7: Practicum Experience.  Successful completion of the Practicum, as documented by the Portfolio must meet the following criteria:  evidence of a substantial and sustained practicum that is standards-based, accomplished in real settings across all authorization levels, planned and guided cooperatively, and taken for graduate credit.  Candidates will work with their practicum mentor, SOU supervising professor, and the LEAD Program Coordinator to plan, develop, and submit the Portfolio.

LEAD 564    Supervision & Evaluation of Instruction (3-4 credits)
This course examines the role of the building and district administrators as instructional leaders.  The approach of the course is both from theoretical and applied perspectives on effective instructional and curriculum leadership. Instructional leadership includes applying knowledge and skills about effective instruction and curriculum to improve teaching practices to increase student learning.

LEAD 585    Contract Management and Human Resources (3-4 credits)
The responsibilities central office personnel and school building administrators have with understanding, monitoring, and maintaining labor agreements that govern employment practices at the school and district levels provide the focus for this course.  The responsibilities associated with maintaining agreements through the collective bargaining process, legal implications related to grievances, aggregations, violations, and irregularities in the management of the collective bargaining agreement and human resource management will be considered.  These implications will include dispute resolution and other grievance procedures by faculty, students, parents, and community members.

LEAD 588    Cultural and Organizational Leadership (3-4 credits)
This seminar considers advanced concepts on the application of cultural competence in relation to Organizational Theory, Behavior, and Administration.  Theoretical concepts addressed will be drawn from across the broad field of management behavior in Business, Industry, Government, and Education with a focus on cultural diversity and awareness and legal implications.  Theories will include those dealing with how organizations are managed at both behavioral and administrative levels in diverse settings.   Differences across the various levels of organizations will be considered, especially as these differences affect legal, cultural, and political aspects of schools and educational organizations.  This seminar will be directed toward an inquiry of effective and culturally competent organizational leadership at the district level and the various administrative components of budget, finance, evaluation, law, and assessment.  This seminar may be taken in collaboration with the Southern Oregon Educational Service District (SOESD) Leadership Development program or other leadership workshops sponsored by the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators or the Oregon School Boards Association.  Students, for example, may attend seminars in association with the SOESD program to fulfill the course and class time requirements for this SOU course.

Modified Courses
ED 346    Special Studies: Child, Family, and Community – increase to 3 cr.
ED 348    Special Studies: Children with Disabilities and Their Families – increase to 3 cr.
ED 365    Special Studies: Children at Risk – increase to 3 credits.
ED 385    Special Studies: The Early Childhood Professional – increase to 3 credits.
ED 398    Teaching Global Perspectives Through Children’s Litereature – approved for Synthesis-Integration.
ED 453    Southern Oregon University Lead and Serve (SOULS) – change credits from 1 to 2 credits to “1 to 3 credits.”
LEAD 528    Leadership Into Practice – change credits to “credit varies”
SPED 511    Internship – change title to Internship (Dual Endorsement Candidates); reword description.
SPED 520    Law and Policy – reword description.
SPED 521    Family and Community Services – reword description.
SPED 521L    Family and Community Services Lab – reword description.
SPED 522    Administration and Interpretation of Assessments – reword description.
SPED 522L    Administration and Interpretation of Assessments Lab – reword description.
SPED 523    Behavior Management – reword description.
SPED 523L    Behavior Management Lab – reword description.
SPED 524    Interventions in Academic Skills: Mathematics – rename Interventions in Academic Skills: Mathematics Methods; reword description.
SPED 524L    Interventions in Academic Skills: Mathematics Lab – rename Interventions in Academic Skills: Mathematics Methods Skills Lab; reword description.
SPED 525    Interventions in Functional Skills – reword description.
SPED 525L    Interventions in Functional Skills Lab – reword description.
SPED 526    IEP Development – change one word in description.
SPED 526L    IEP Development Lab – reword description.
SPED 527    Theory and Tools of Assessment – reword description.
SPED 527L    Theory and Tools of Assessment Lab – reword description.
SPED 528    Medical Aspects of Special Education and Characteristics of Disabilities – reword description.
SPED 528L    Medical Aspects of Special Education and Characteristics of Disabilities Lab – reword description.

Changes to Early Childhood Development major:
Requirements for the Major:
 
•    In #5, the 6 credits of ED 409 include portfolio requirements.  In Upper Division Courses, change credits for ED 346, 348, 365, 385, and 489 to 3 credits each.

Changes to Elementary Education major:
Requirements for the major:
•    In #4, update credits for Content Knowledge and Pedagogy areas; credits are for SOU
Content Knowledge/University Studies strand:  
•    omit “language arts (children’s literature)” from description of strand.  
•    In summary of requirements, include guidelines for Explorations courses as follows: Humanities Explorations (one English, one Art History); Sciences Explorations (one Life Science, one Physical Science; two courses must have labs); Social Science Explorations (one History, one Geography, HE 250).
•    Add the following additional content knowledge courses to requirements:  ED 434 (Educational Technology), 3 cr; MUS 372 (Intro to Music Education), 2 cr; MUS 373 (Elementary General Music Methods and Materials), 2 cr.

Pre-license/Education Elective Options strand:
Add the following courses to the choice of courses:  ANTH 213, 310, 317, 318, 319; ED 446, 447, 448.  Omit ED 488, MU 373.

Pedagogy Strand:
Omit ED 488 and MUS 373 from required courses [MUS 373 is included in Content Knowledge strand]

Other changes to majors
A number of changes have been made to the graduate level requirements, and these will be reviewed by the Graduate Council.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 


ACCELERATED BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAM

  - list by area/program instead of department.


CERTIFICATES

Certificate in Applied Finance and Economics (CAFÉ)
•    Add EC 319 (Public Finance) to course choices for Public Sector focus area.

Certificate in Botany
•    In #3 Core credits: increase from 20 to 24; add BI 434/534 to core requirements; update course title for BI 436/536.
•    In #4, increase from one course to two courses and increase from 3-4 credits to 6-9 credits; omit BI 485/585, and add BI 383, 442/542, 544/544, and GEOG 451/551 to course choices.
•    Omit #5.
•    #6: renumber #5; change BI 403/503 option to BI 503, and add BI 485/585 as option.
•    #7: renumber #6.

Certificate in Business Information Systems
•    Remove statement about courses taken for certificate being completed with a grade of C or better.
•    Update course titles for BA 351, 352.

Certificate in Nonprofit Management
•    Discontinue affiliation with American Humanics consortium.
•    Add BA 211 (Accounting Information I) as prerequisite, 4 credits.
•    Add 6 credits of BA 409/509 (Internship) to Core courses; update course titles for BA 430A/530A, 430B/530B; update course credits for BA 468/568.  20 credits of core.
•    Revise list of electives, eliminate the three categories of electives, and decrease elective credits from 12 credits to 4 credits.
•    Decrease internship hours from 300 hours to 180 hours; eliminate requirement to participate in SOU American Humanics Nonprofit Student Association.

Certificate in Interactive Marketing and E-Commerce
•    In electives list, BA 409, 428, and 499 must be in a related area and be approved in advance by the certificate advisor.

Certificate in Management of Human Resources
•    Omit statement about students needing to be either current SOU student meeting requirements for BA or BS, or students who have already received BA or BS.
•    Update core course list to have BA 475 an option with COMM 475 (instead of an option with PSY 445).
•    In electives, update BA/COMM/PSY 407 to Mediation and Conflict Management BA/COMM/PSY 448.

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Accounting
•    Update course titles for BA 351, 352, 353; update course number for Business Law.


ELS LANGUAGE CENTERS

Modified Courses
ELS 110, 111, 112    Masters Modules – change credits to 3-4 credits.


HONORS PROGRAM

•    Becoming an Honors Student: in #3, change combined ACT score from 25 to 27.


GRADUATE STUDIES

 


Master of Science in Environmental Education

New Courses  [create new EE prefix for Environmental Education courses]
EE 501     Research, credits to be arranged

EE 503     Thesis, credits to be arranged

EE 507     Selected Topics in Environmental Education, 1 credit
Seminar explores current topics in Environmental Education.  Presented at Deer Creek Center for Field Research and Education.  Offered in conjunction with EE 594 Leadership in Environmental Education and EE 595 Teaching in Environmental Education.

EE 524     Concepts in Environmental Education, 3 credits
The field of environmental education is explored from its beginnings to the present.  The course considers the diversity of goals and practices in environmental education including place-based education.  Students will visit, research, and evaluate environmental education programs and curricula including both local and national programs.  Field trips to local programs.

EE 525     Special Methods in Environmental Education, 2 credits
Designed to compliment ED 557, Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment.  This course considers current educational methods for the classroom and adapts them for environmental educators in diverse settings, especially the field.  Additional topics include the creation of field-based activities and interpretive signage.  Co-requisites: ED 557 (fall offering).

EE 526     Trends in Environmental Education, 2 credits
Focuses on environmental education as a profession.  Current literature is analyzed to evaluate trends within the field.  The course focuses on how professional environmental educators contribute to the development of the field including research and publications.

EE 527     Place-based Curriculum Development, 3 credits
The field course studies the physical and biological environment at Deer Creek Center for Field Research and Education or another site in the Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion.  Students investigate patterns of natural resource use by the community.  This knowledge is then used to generate a place-based curriculum for implementation at the field station.  Overnight field trips required.  

EE 528     Environmental Issues, 4 credits
Relevant environmental issues important to today’s environmental educators will be investigated.  The course prepares environmental educators to address a wide range of local, regional, and global issues facing society.  Areas of study include the loss of biodiversity and strategies for preservation and recovery of threatened species, management of natural resources in a sustainable manner, and global issues affecting the welfare of the human population and the biosphere.

EE 593     Practical Applications of Environmental Education, 2-4 credits
Internship focuses on using the field as a classroom.  Students work closely with environmental educators in either a non-profit organization or local, state, or national government agency to develop and present activities and curricula for a variety of audiences.  

EE 594     Leadership in Environmental Education, 2-4 credits  
Students manage an educational program at Deer Creek Center for Field Research and Education.  Includes marketing, communication with participants, coordinating and scheduling programs, developing resources for future classes.  Participation at Deer Creek Center involves part-time residence at the field station.  Pre-requisites: EE 525 and EE 527.

EE 595     Teaching in Environmental Education, 4 credits
Students present and assess an educational program at Deer Creek Center for Field Research and Education involving a variety of audiences.  Teaching will be supervised by qualified faculty members from Southern Oregon University.  Participation at Deer Creek Center involves part-time residence at the field station.  Pre-requisites:  EE 525 and EE 527.  



Master in Business Administration

Modified Courses
MBA 511      Critical Analytical Thinking and Expression – rename Critical Analytical Thinking and Communication.
MBA 575    Organizational Behavior – rename Advanced Organizational Behavior.

Changes to major
•    A number of changes to wording, admission procedures, and policies; these will be reviewed by the Graduate Council.


Master in Management

Modified Courses
MM 513    Strategic Management – modify description.
MM 520    Orientation to Graduate Study for the Management Professional – add one sentence to description.
MM 530A    Nonprofit Organization Management – rename Nonprofit Grant Writing and Government Relations; modify description to emphasize assessing and evaluating grant-based programs.
MM 530B    Applied Nonprofit Organization Management – rename Nonprofit Volunteerism, Board Development, and Community Mobilization; modify description to emphasize mobilizing community involvement.
MM 540    Topics in Management – minor description change.


PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Optometry
- clarify titles for University Studies programs.

Pharmacy
 - Omit Biochemistry sequence [OSU requires Human Anatomy and Physiology, not Biochem]
 - Omit HE 252 from requirements

Psychology, Counseling, Social Work, or Human Service
 - update text due to elimination of Human Service track of MAP.


STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

•    Add new program at University of Sheffield (England)
•    Add new program at Universidad de las Americas (Cholula, Mexico)